Tag Archives: Aimee Ng

Cocktails With A Curator: Manet’s “Bullfight” (Video)

n this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” Curator Aimee Ng explores the turbulent history behind Édouard Manet’s “Bullfight,” once part of a larger work that the artist exhibited at the Salon of 1864. The original canvas was derided and caricatured by critics, prompting Manet to cut it into pieces. The two surviving fragments were brought together for the first and only time during a 1999 exhibition at the Frick. This week’s complementary cocktail is, fittingly enough, the Toreador.

To view this painting in detail, please visit our website: https://www.frick.org/manetbullfight

Cocktails With A Curator: Vermeer’s “Mistress And Maid” (The Frick Video)

In this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” Curator Aimee Ng pulls back the curtain on hidden details in “Mistress and Maid,” the largest of the Frick’s three Vermeer paintings and Henry Clay Frick’s final acquisition for his collection. Take a closer look at the rumpled tablecloth, the lady’s wispy curls, and the dark background to understand how this mysterious work has changed since Vermeer applied paint to canvas in the mid-17th century. For this week’s complementary cocktail, the Genever Brûlée, Aimee has dipped into the bottle of genever she featured in her summer episode on Vermeer’s “Officer and Laughing Girl.”

To view this painting in detail, please visit our website: https://www.frick.org/mistressmaid

Cocktails With A Curator: Lawrence’s ‘Lady Peel’

In this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” Curator Aimee Ng explores the history behind Sir Thomas Lawrence’s celebrated portrait of Julia, Lady Peel. When it was shown at the Royal Academy, in 1827, this painting was hailed as Sir Thomas’s greatest portrait—and one of the great works of modern art at the time.

It’s easy to see why: the sitter projects authority, confidence, and ease despite her flamboyant, over-the-top outfit. Sir Thomas’s depiction of Lady Peel is closely related to Peter Paul Rubens’s famous “Chapeau de Paille,” which had recently entered the collection of her husband, Sir Robert Peel. In recognition of the lavish bracelets and rings worn by the sitter, this week’s complementary cocktail is the Bijou (French for “jewel”).

To view this painting in detail, please visit our website: https://www.frick.org/ladypeel

Video Profile: ‘Elsie De Wolfe’ – America’s First Professional Interior Designer (1859 – 1950)

The year 2020 marks the one-hundredth anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment, which granted millions of women in the U.S. the right to vote.

The Frick is celebrating with a series of videos honoring the stories of women who made, appeared in, collected, and took care of art in this collection. In the second-to-last episode, meet Elsie de Wolfe, America’s first professional interior designer, who decorated the Frick’s Fifth Avenue home. #WhatsHerStory

Elsie de Wolfe, also known as Lady Mendl, (December 20, c. 1859 – July 12, 1950) was an American actress and interior decorator.

Born in New York City, de Wolfe was acutely sensitive to environment from her earliest years, and became one of the first women interior designers, replacing heavy Victorian styles with light, intimate effects and uncluttered room layouts. Her marriage to English diplomat Sir Charles Mendl was seen as one of convenience, though she was proud to be called Lady Mendl, and her lifelong companion was Elisabeth Marbury, with whom she lived in New York and Paris. De Wolfe was a prominent social figure, who entertained in the most distinguished circles.

Cocktails With A Curator: ‘Romney’s “Lady Hamilton”

In this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” join Curator Aimee Ng on a fascinating journey as she traces the life of Lady Hamilton (née Amy Lyon), who was seventeen years old when she posed for this painting by George Romney. Lady Hamilton’s great strength was her ability to transform herself: the daughter of a blacksmith, she married Sir William Hamilton, the British ambassador to the Kingdom of Naples, and fell in love with Lord Horatio Nelson (apparently with her husband’s blessing). Along the way, she became a darling of the court of Naples and a favorite of Maria Carolina, sister of Marie Antoinette. As an homage to her time spent in Naples, this week’s complementary cocktail is a Limoncello Spritz.

To view this painting in detail, please visit our website: https://www.frick.org/ladyhamiltonSHOW LESS

Cocktails With A Curator: Bronzino’s ‘Lodovico Capponi’ (Frick Video)

In this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” Curator Aimee Ng explores the life of Lodovico Capponi, the subject of a 16th-century portrait at the Frick by Agnolo Bronzino. A page at the Medici court, Lodovico had the misfortune of falling in love with a Florentine noblewoman whom Duke Cosimo I intended to marry to one of his cousins. Join Aimee with an Aperol Spritz as she discusses one of her favorite works in the museum and examines what some of the details—from his black-and-white outfit to the partially obscured cameo in his right hand—may tell us about the young man and his life.

To view this painting in detail, please visit our website: https://www.frick.org/agnolobronzino

Cocktails With A Curator: Ingres’s ‘Comtesse d’Haussonville’ (Video)

In this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” Curator Aimee Ng explores the history behind one of the audience favorites at the Frick, Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres’s “Comtesse d’Haussonville.” Sometimes referred to as the “poster girl” of The Frick Collection, the subject of this celebrated portrait led a fascinating life, taking piano lessons from Chopin and writing biographies of Lord Byron and the Irish revolutionary Robert Emmet. (She published the books anonymously to avoid a scandal.) This week’s complementary cocktail calls for an ounce of absinthe, an anise-flavored spirit invented in Switzerland, the country of her birth.

Travels With A Curator: “St. James Park, London”

In this week’s episode of “Travels with a Curator,” explore the history of St. James’s Park with Curator Aimee Ng. This popular attraction in London serves as the backdrop for Thomas Gainsborough’s “Mall in St. James’s Park,” which he painted about 1783 for George III. Originally a cockleshell-strewn court for playing pall-mall, a precursor of croquet, the Mall was a place of visual encounters, where fashionable 18th-century Londoners (and their pets) could see and be seen.

To see this painting in detail, please visit our website: https://collections.frick.org/objects…SHOW LESS

Travels With A Curator: “Honolulu Museum Of Art” (The Frick Video)

In this week’s episode of “Travels with a Curator,” join Curator Aimee Ng as she explores the Honolulu Museum of Art, which lent a portrait of Lady Meux by James McNeill Whistler to the Frick for its 2003 exhibition, “Whistler, Women, and Fashion.” Founded by Anna Rice Cooke, the daughter of a prominent missionary family in Hawaii, the Honolulu Museum of Art was meant to ensure that the children of the islands would have a place to learn not only about their own background and culture but about those of the diverse populations around them.

SHOW LESS

Cocktails With A Curator: “Vermeer’s ‘Officer And Laughing Girl'” (Video)

In this week’s episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” get up close to one of the Frick’s three beloved Vermeer paintings, “Officer and Laughing Girl,” with Curator Aimee Ng. While enjoying your Kopstootje—a shot of jenever (a traditional Dutch liquor) paired with a pint of beer—join Aimee in examining the artist’s masterful skill at portraying light and exploring the complex histories behind a seemingly simple hat.

Johannes Vermeer, in original Dutch Jan Vermeer van Delft, was a Dutch Baroque Period painter who specialized in domestic interior scenes of middle class life. During his lifetime, he was a moderately successful provincial genre painter, recognized in Delft and The Hague.