Tag Archives: Museum Exhibitions

Art: ‘TITIAN – WOMEN, MYTH & POWER’, Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston

An exhibition many have called “the art show of the year” are now on display at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. It includes a collection of masterworks by Titian, which have not been seen together in more than 400 years. Special correspondent Jared Bowen, of WGBH, takes a look as part of our arts and culture series, “CANVAS.”

Exhibit Tours: ‘Surrealism Beyond Borders’ – The Met

Nearly from its inception, Surrealism has had an international scope, but knowledge of the movement has been formed primarily through a Western European focus. Join Stephanie D’Alessandro, the Leonard A. Lauder Curator of Modern Art and Senior Research Coordinator in the Department of Modern and Contemporary Art at The Met, and explore this exhibition, which reconsiders the true “movement” of Surrealism beyond boundaries of geography and chronology—and within networks that span Eastern Europe to the Caribbean, Asia to North Africa, and Australia to Latin America. Including examples from almost eight decades and produced across at least 45 countries, Surrealism Beyond Borders offers a fresh appraisal of some of the collective concerns and exchanges—as well as historical, national, and local distinctions—that will recast appreciation of this most revolutionary and globe-spanning movement. Learn more about the exhibition at https://www.metmuseum.org/surrealism

Met Museum Exhibit Tour: The Medici – Portraits And Politics, 1512-1570 (Video)

Join exhibition curator Keith Christiansen and Renaissance art historians Linda Wolk-Simon and Davide Gasparatto in conversation about the exhibition “The Medici: Portraits and Politics, 1512–1570,” and the development of the Florentine identity through portraits under Cosimo I de’ Medici’s rule. Film made possible by the generous support of The Brownstein Family Foundation, a Patron Member of The Friends of the Bargello. Learn more about the exhibition “The Medici: Portraits and Politics, 1512–1570” on The Met’s website: https://www.metmuseum.org/MediciPortr…

London: ‘Tate Modern’ Museum Turns 21 (Video)

Tate Modern was opened on 11 May 2000 by Her Majesty the Queen, on the site of Bankside’s converted power station. To mark Tate Modern’s 21st birthday, we’re celebrating 21 years of Tate Modern’s iconic Turbine Hall at the heart of the gallery, which has hosted some of the world’s most memorable and renowned works of contemporary art. From Louise Bourgeois’ mammoth spider and Carsten Höller’s silver slides to Olafur Eliasson’s glowing sun and Ai Weiwei’s sea of sunflower seeds, the way artists have continually transformed this vast industrial space has revolutionised how we perceive contemporary art.

Paris Exhibitions: ‘Signac – The Colored Harmonies’ Musée Jacquemart-André

Signac, Colored Harmonies – From March 26 to July 19, 2021

In 2021, discover the work of Paul Signac (1863 – 1935), master of landscape and main theorist of neo-impressionism, through nearly 70 works from the finest collection of neo-impressionist works in private hands. Alongside 25 of his paintings such as Avant du Tub (1888), Saint-Briac. Les Balises (1890), Saint-Tropez. After the storm (1895), Avignon. Matin (1909) or Juan-les-Pins, Soir (1914) and around twenty watercolors, the exhibition will present more than twenty works by Georges Seurat, Camille Pissarro, Maximilen Luce, Théo Van Rysselberghe, Henri-Edmond Cross , Louis Hayet, Achille Laugé, Georges Lacombe and Georges Lemmen.

The entire exhibition will follow a chronological route, from the first impressionist paintings painted by Signac under the influence of Claude Monet to the brightly colored works produced by the artist in the 20th century, including his meeting with Georges Seurat in 1884. The exhibition, which will retrace the life of Signac and his work to liberate color, will also evoke the history of neo-impressionism.

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Art: ‘After Raphael. 1520 -2020’ – State Hermitage Museum, Russia (Video)

A film about the Exhibition “After Raphael. 1520 – 2020” at the State Hermitage Museum. Director of the film – Manas Sirakanyan. The film was made with the support of the U.S. Ambassadors Fund for Cultural Preservation, U.S. Embassy Moscow and the Hermitage Museum Foundation (USA)

Raphael is the most influential artist of the Modern Era. Over the course of five centuries, exponents of Mannerism and Academicism, Caravaggisti and masters of the Baroque, Romantics and Modernists have invariably compared their own work with Raphael’s legacy. What is the cause of such fame? What did his name represent in this or that historical period, and what does it represent today? What connects the artist’s followers in different centuries? The exhibition in the Hermitage is an attempt to answer those questions and to look at the art of the past 500 years through the lens of Raphael’s influence.

The large-scale display includes more than 300 exhibits – paintings, graphic art, sculpture and applied art from the Hermitage’s own stocks and twelve other collections in Russia and Western Europe. They include both famous masterpieces and previously unknown works. Dozens of paintings and pieces of graphic art are leaving the museum’s storerooms and being presented to the public for the first time, while a whole number of the exhibits are going on show after painstaking restoration in the Hermitage’s workshops.

The display opens with works by the master himself: a painting and drawings from European collections. Without claiming to be a full representation of the artist’s oeuvre, they serve to set the tone, as it were, and after viewers have “tuned themselves in” it will be easier for them to identify echoes of Raphaelesque harmony in the works from later centuries. The choice of graphic art for this purpose reveals another dimension to the main metaphor: it is specifically the beauty of the clear, precise line, so evident in the drawings made by the master’s own hand, that lies at the foundation of the aesthetics of Raphael himself and many of his followers.

Video Profile: Icelandic Illustrator Kristjana S. Williams In “Wonderland”

Step inside the eye-popping studio of Icelandic illustrator Kristjana S. Williams. Kristjana’s work blends traditional Victorian engravings with digital collage techniques to create layered landscapes full of hidden details. Here, we see a sneak preview of her latest V&A commission: creating a series of original illustrations for a new book, accompanying the exhibition Alice: Curiouser and Curiouser.

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