Tag Archives: Children

Science: Saving Children From Cancer, Greenhouse Gases, SpaceX Missions

Children with some of the most aggressive forms of cancer are being saved by a personalised medicine treatment programme in Australia. The Zero Childhood Cancer Program has saved more than 150 children who would’ve otherwise died. The team shares a moving interview with one of the parents. 

Lichens evolve even more slowly than you might think. The team examines new research into the abundant Trebouxia genus of lichen which appears to take around a million years to adapt to changing climate conditions.

Enhanced weathering – using ground-up rocks to draw carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere – is one of a number of technological carbon capture solutions being tested to try and mitigate against global warming. The team speaks to Professor David Beerling of the University of Sheffield, one of the scientists in the UK leading the development of this technique.

SpaceX has a suite of three missions planned to launch in its Polaris programme. The first aims to take its Dragon crew capsule higher into orbit than anyone has flown since the Apollo moon missions. The team shares what we know so far.

And they find out whether adult human brains can actually grow new neurons. Spoiler: it doesn’t look good.

Education: Can Science Help Poor Kids Earn More?

The wide gap in development between rich and poor children could be closed with the help of neuroscience. Might a controversial focus on genetics also help? Film supported by @Mishcon de Reya LLP

Video timeline: 00:00– The achievement gap between rich and poor kids 00:55 – Words matter in childhood development 03:16 – Conversation can combat childhood inequality 05:09 – Can genetics help close the achievement gap? 07:30 – Genetics can be controversial

1950’s: A ‘Moral Panic’ That Targeted Comic Books

Comic books have been a staple of American pop culture for the better part of 90 years. The origin story of comics as we know them, however, is much more complicated. In the 1950s, a moral panic swept across the country — one in which parents and children burned comic books by the bushel in public gatherings — and led to the near destruction of the comic book industry. Comics were big business even by the 1940s. They reached millions of readers each week. And the superheroes created then have now become billion-dollar franchises, showcased in blockbuster films and massive conventions such as Comic-Con. Events in 1954, however, almost changed that. Laws were passed. Careers were ruined. And comics fell under a strict censorship regime that lasted for decades to come.

Analysis: How Do Video Games, Smartphones & Computers Affect Brains

Smartphones, computers, gaming consoles or digital tablets are now givens in our daily lives. The electronic intrusion is causing controversy and collective hysteria. This documentary asks: Are we damaging our brains with all these screens? How will unprecedented exposure to screens impact humanity?

To find out, the filmmakers examine how science has been applied to distinguish between truth and falsehoods, and explore the suspected side-effects of screen exposure. The documentary travels through the US and Europe to meet and speak to researchers who are leaders in this field.

Development Disorders: ‘What Is Autism?’ (Video)

Autism affects an estimated 1 in 54 children in the United States. You’ve probably heard a lot of thoughts and ideas about autism. What better way to honor World Autism Day than by raising our own awareness about people with autistic spectrum disorders. 𝐃𝐮𝐤𝐞 𝐂𝐞𝐧𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐟𝐨𝐫 𝐀𝐮𝐭𝐢𝐬𝐦 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐁𝐫𝐚𝐢𝐧 𝐃𝐞𝐯𝐞𝐥𝐨𝐩𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐭 The Duke Center for Autism and Brain Development delivers state-of-the-art interdisciplinary clinical care, conducts cutting-edge research, trains the next generation of scientists, and advocates for public policies to help ensure people with autism reach their full potential.

Podcast Interviews: Lego Foundation CEO John Goodwin – “Reimagining”

Monocle’s editor in chief, Tyler Brûlé, is joined by John Goodwin, the CEO of the Lego Foundation, from its home city of Billund in Denmark. We learn why the global crisis in education might be an opportunity to reimagine learning and to rediscover the value of play.

Morning News Podcast: Families Form ‘Schooling Pods’, Coronavirus Safety And Washington Redskins

Axios TodayMany school districts are still debating whether to go with a virtual, in classroom or hybrid education model for the year, but some families are taking their children’s education into their own hands. Neighbors are banding together to form schooling “pods” with private instructors as a way to secure child care and make sure their kids don’t fall behind in school. 

But this trend could deepen the educational divide along racial and class lines.

  • President Trump changes tact on Coronavirus safety
  • Re-branding the Washington Redskins

Guests: Axios’ Caitlin Owens, Margaret Talev, and Kendall Baker.

Top New Science Podcasts: Covid-19 Inflammatory Response, Glacier Retreat

science-magazine-podcastsFirst up this week, Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel talks with host Sarah Crespi about a rare inflammatory response in children that has appeared in a number of COVID-19 hot spots. 

Next, Julian Dowdeswell, director of the Scott Polar Research Institute and professor of physical geography at the University of Cambridge, talks with producer Meagan Cantwell about tracing the retreat of Antarctica’s glaciers by examining the ocean floor. Finally, Kiki Sanford interviews author Danny Dorling about his new book, Slowdown: The End of the Great Acceleration―and Why It’s Good for the Planet, the Economy, and Our Lives.

Top New Science Podcasts: Splitting Water With Light, Missing Matter And Working Memory (Nature)

nature-podcastsThis week, perfecting catalysts that split water using light, the mystery of missing matter in the Universe and how working memory ‘works’ in children.

In this episode:

00:44 Water splitting

After decades of research scientists have managed to achieve near perfect efficiency using a light-activated catalyst to separate hydrogen from water for fuel. Research Article: Takata et al.News and Views: An almost perfectly efficient light-activated catalyst for producing hydrogen from water

05:37 Research Highlights

The hidden water inside the earth’s core, and how working memory ‘works’ in children. Research Highlight: Our planet’s heart is wateryResearch Highlight: A child’s memory prowess is revealed by brain patterns

07:53 Measuring matter

Estimations of baryonic matter in the Universe have conflicted with observations, but now researchers have reconciled these differences. Research Article: Macquart et al.

13:42 Pick of the Briefing

We pick our highlights from the Nature Briefing, including the possibility of a black hole in our solar system, and the biting bees that force plants to bloom. Physics World: If ‘Planet Nine’ is a primordial black hole, could we detect it with a fleet of tiny spacecraft?; Scientific American: Bumblebees Bite Plants to Force Them to Flower (Seriously)

Neuroscience Podcast: “Consciousness Theories” And “Biased Childhood Memories” (ScienceMag)

We don’t know where consciousness comes from. And we don’t know whether animals have it, or whether we can detect it in patients in comas. Do neuroscientists even know where to look? A new competition aims to narrow down the bewildering number of theories of consciousness and get closer to finding its biological signs by pitting different theories against each other in experimental settings. Freelance journalist Sara Reardon talks with host Sarah Crespi about how the competition will work.

Science Mag Podcast ConsciousnessIn our second segment, we talk about how we think about children. For thousands of years, adults have complained about their lack of respect, intelligence, and tendency to distraction, compared with previous generations. A new study out this week in Science Advances suggests our own biased childhood memories might be at fault. Sarah Crespi talks with John Protzko of the University of California, Santa Barbara, about how terrible people thought kids were in 3800 B.C.E. and whether understanding those biases might change how people view Generation Z today.

To read more: https://www.sciencemag.org/podcast/trying-find-mind-brain-and-why-adults-are-always-criticizing-kids-these-days