Tag Archives: History Magazines

Preview: History Today Magazine – December 2022

December issue

Inside December 2022 issue:

Age of Doubt: Saints and Sceptics

The medieval period was a golden age of saints and miracles, but they were met with a healthy dose of scepticism.

‘A Baptism of Blood’

Fighting for the Union in the US Civil War, Welsh soldiers discovered that the cost of assimilation was the loss of their native language.

Renaissance Wonder Women

To Renaissance audiences, the mythical Amazons were exotic, mysterious and revealed hidden truths about their own society.

Previews: Smithsonian Magazine – December 2022

Smithsonian Magazine – December 2022

Smithsonian Magazine – December 2022:

The Sweet and Sticky History of the Date

Throughout the Middle East, the versatile fruit has been revered since antiquity. How will it fare in a changing world?

This Guatemalan Village Is Becoming a Work of Art

To help boost its appeal to tourists, local residents are transforming their lakeside town into a living art installation

Previews: History Today Magazine – November 2022

Nov 22

Tutankhamun in the Flesh

The discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922 reopened arguments about the presumed race of the ancient Egyptians.

Eleanor Roosevelt’s Second Act

After the death of her husband in 1945, Eleanor Roosevelt left the White House and embarked upon a new career as  ‘First Lady of the World’.

‘The Vote is of the People’

Brazilian democracy is young, hard-won and under threat. As the country goes to the polls, its history reminds us that the right to vote is not a given.

Women, Life, Freedom

Iranian women have always been present in national uprisings, but this time they are leading them.

Previews: Archaeology Magazine – Nov/Dec 2022

Priestess, Poet, Politician

4,000 years ago, the world’s first author composed verses that helped forge the Akkadian Empire

Mexico’s Butterfly Warriors

The annual monarch migration may have been a sacred event for the people of Mesoamerica

A Tale of Two Abbeys

How entrepreneurial monks shaped the landscape of medieval England

Bronze Age Urban Experiment

Archaeologists debate who ruled the cities of the ancient Indus Valley

Magical Mystery Door

An investigation of an Egyptian sacred portal reveals a history of renovation and deception

Previews: Smithsonian Magazine – October 2022

Cover for October 2022

Smithsonian Magazine October 2022 Issue:

Founding Force

How America’s “first politician” galvanized a colony—and helped set a revolution in motion. BY STACY SCHIFF

Glen Canyon Reveals Its Secrets

Water woes threaten America’s second largest reservoir—but leave new vistas in their wake. PHOTOGRAPHS AND TEXT BY PETE MCBRIDE

Tolkien’s World

Haunted by the approach of another world war, the beloved fantasy author created a new story of Middle-earth that few people even knew about—until now. BY JOHN GARTH, PHOTOGRAPHS BY KIERAN DODDS

Ray of Hope

The giant fish faces threats from poachers, boat strikes and climate change. PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALEX MUSTARD, TEXT BY TERENCE MONMANEY

 

Scents and Sensibility

From the lab to the art gallery, the latest efforts to understand the fragrant, musky, stinky and utterly baffling world of your nose

BY ABIGAIL TUCKER

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CAROLINE TOMPKINS

Views: American Heritage Magazine – September 2022

september 2022 cover

Antietam, America’s Bloodiest Day

In September 1862 the South hoped to end the war by invading Maryland just before the mid-term elections. But its hopes were dashed after the bloodiest day in American history. By Justin Martin

Johnstown: “Run For Your Lives!”

In the hills above Johnstown, the old South Fork dam had failed. Down the Little Conemaugh came the torrent, sweeping away everything in its path. By David McCullough

Remembering David McCullough

He became the dean of American historians after learning his craft working for five years on the staff of American Heritage. By Edwin S. Grosvenor

Carving Up the Americas

By artfully illustrating the boundaries of colonial powers, mapmakers in the 1700s helped define what our New World would become. By Neal AsburyJean-Pierre Isbouts

Previews: Smithsonian Magazine – September 2022

Smithsonian Magazine    In Search of King Arthur  September image 1


SCIENCE

Cougars Are Killing Feral Donkeys, and That’s Good for Wetlands

Mountain lions play an important role in the Death Valley ecosystem by preying on the introduced species

Sam Zlotnik

SCIENCE

How Long Will It Take to Understand Long Covid?

SCIENCE

The Incredible Story of the Iceberg That Sank the Titanic


SMART NEWS

Why Was a Synagogue Mural Hidden Behind a Wall in a Vermont Apartment?

August 22, 2022 8:35 a.m.


Did Archaeologists Find Saint Peter’s Birthplace?

August 19, 2022


Western States Are Fighting Over How to Conserve Shrinking Water Supply

August 19, 2022

Previews: History Today Magazine – August 2022

August 2022August 2022

Ahmad Shah Durrani, father of  Prince Darab, Mughal School, 1757. CPA Media Co. Ltd/TopFoto.

Prince Darab’s Lost Treasure

Fleeing his father’s empire, an Afghan prince travelled from Kabul to Sindh via Mecca, becoming a fugitive, courtier and pilgrim in the process.

Nigel Farage’s Bayeux Tapestry tie, 20 November 2014.

Law of the Land

What relevance do the Norman Conquest and the events of 1066 have to contemporary British politics? Everything and nothing.

Executions

Violent Ends

Early modern methods of execution were carefully calculated to inflict shame upon the condemned. 

he  Felix Dzerzhinsky tractor factory dispatches DT-54 tractors, 1930s.

The Unbreakable City

The Battle of Stalingrad began in August 1942, subjecting its residents to months of living hell. But few doubted that the city was worth defending; its significance to the Soviet project made it too important to abandon.

Preview: History Today Magazine – July 2022

A postcard from Casablanca, with an advertisment for absinthe, undated.

FEATURE

Under the Influence

Alcohol was part of daily life in the colonial Maghreb. In 1913 the French banned alcohol in Tunisia, revealing a deep distrust of local drinks and their Jewish and Muslim makers. 

Members of the Official IRA manning a barricade, the Bogside, Derry, April 1972.

FEATURE

An Irish Cuba?

During the worst year of the Troubles, the British government became alarmed at the implications of a Soviet embassy opening in Dublin.

Preview: Smithsonian Magazine – June 2022

June 2022

Cover for June 2022

FEATURES

 

Flesh, Blood & Bronze

One sculptor and his team of artists take on the epic project of conveying the century-old conflict through a massive bronze installation

BY JEFF MACGREGOR

PHOTOGRAPHS BY VINCENT TULLO

 

Not Far From Kyiv

To residents of Southern California with ties to the Eastern European nations, the conflict feels close to home

PHOTOGRAPHS AND INTERVIEWS BY STELLA KALININA

 

In a Tight Spot

Conservationists are racing to rescue a delightful coastal animal from rising seas

PHOTOGRAPH BY LAUREN OWENS LAMBERT

TEXT BY MADDIE BENDER

 

The Real Pinocchio

Forget what you know from the cartoon. The 19th-century story, now in a new translation, was a rallying cry for universal education and Italian nationhood

BY PERRI KLASS

PHOTOGRAPHS BY SIMONA GHIZZONI

 

Escape from the Gilded Cage

Even if her husband was a murderer, a woman in a bad marriage once had few options. Unless she fled to South Dakota

BY APRIL WHITE

DEPARTMENTS

Discussion

Ethical Collecting

For more than a century, museum artifacts were acquired in ways we no longer find acceptable. How can we repair the damage?

Popular Wisdom

The world’s largest book repository has expanded far beyond its original scope to include sound recordings and digitized collections

Van Gogh in the Grove

A new exhibition of lesser known works during a pivotal time sheds light on his budding genius

Role of a Lifetime

An unpublished memoir reveals how the world’s most famous child actress became a star of the environmental movement

A Brief History of Red Drink

The obscure roots of a centuries-old beverage that’s now a Juneteenth fixture

The Next Clone

Forget Dolly the Sheep. The birth of a mouse named Cumulina 25 years ago launched a genetic revolution