Thailand: ‘Blowguns Of The Mani Tribe’ (Video)

Hazen travels to the Malay Peninsula and meets with members of the Mani tribe, a group of hunter-gathers who have lived for the land for centuries. Hazen learns how to use their trademark tool for hunting, the blowgun.

The Maniq or Mani are an ethnic group of Thailand. They are more widely known in Thailand as the Sakai (Thai: ซาไก), a controversial derogatory term meaning ‘slave’ or ‘barbarism’.[2] They are the only Negrito group in Thailand and speak a variety of related Aslian languages, primarily Kensiu and Ten’edn. The Lisu have their own language, culture, and no alphabet.[3]

In Thailand, the Maniq minority live in the southern provinces of Yala, Narathiwat, Phatthalung, Trang, and Satun.[2]

The Maniq are a hunting and gathering society. They build temporary huts of bamboo with roofs made of banana leaves. They hunt many types of animals and consume many different kinds of vegetables and fruits. They wear simple clothes made of materials such as bamboo leaves. They are familiar with many different species of medicinal herbs.[4]

English Country Homes: ‘Morley Manor’, Hamlet Of Shermanbury, West Sussex

According to its Historic England listing, the present Grade II-listed manor house dates from the 17th century or earlier, although the original manor of Morley was one of three Shermanbury manors listed in the Domesday survey.

Restored, enlarged and partly rebuilt over the years, Morley Manor stands in 14¼ acres of pristine gardens, grounds and post-and-railed paddocks, with southerly views to the South Downs.

It offers more than 6,900sq ft of sumptuously refurbished living space, including a large reception hall and four reception rooms.

The equestrian facility includes a stable courtyard with 11 stables, a heated rug room, a horse wash-down bay with hot and cold water, a heated tack room (what bliss!), a separate oak tack room and two first-floor apartments.

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Top Aerial Travel Videos: ‘Southern England’

When you take flight over Britain, you encounter more than picturesque landscapes, historical monuments, and engineering wonders. You become immersed in a world of mythical heroes, proud cultures, and thousands of years of rich history. Soar over the moorlands and cliffs of Northern and Southern England, the fairy-tale castles of Wales, and the eerie lochs of Scotland. Discover stories of remarkable people, from legends of the past to the passionate, spirited people who call Britain home today.

Housing: Flood Insurance Is Spurring Buyers To Live In Dangerous Areas (CNBC)

2020 is officially the busiest hurricane season on record and flooding is one of a storm’s most devastating consequences. FEMA estimates one inch of flood water can cause up to $25,000 in damage. The U.S. began offering nationalize flood insurance in 1968 but the program, called the NFIP, is now over $20 billion in debt. Private companies are starting to offer flood insurance as well. However, flood insurance is more complicated than it may appear. Watch the video to better understand how flood insurance works, and doesn’t work, in the U.S.

Media: ‘The Law At The Center Of The Big Tech Debate In Congress’ (WSJ)

Leaders in government and tech want to rewrite a law that governs the internet. WSJ explains Section 230, how it shaped the modern internet, and what lawmakers and tech executives want to change.

Photo illustration: Carlos Waters/WSJ

Technology Podcast: Concerns Over Facial Recognition Technology

Scientists have grave concerns over ethical and societal impacts of facial-recognition technology. In this surveillance special, we dig into the details.

In this episode:

03:24 Standing up against ‘smart cities’

Cities across the globe are installing thousands of surveillance cameras equipped with facial recognition technology. Although marketed as a way to reduce crime, researchers worry that these systems are ripe for exploitation and are calling for strict regulations on their deployment.

Feature: Resisting the rise of facial recognition

17:44 The ethics of researching facial recognition technology

Despite concerns surrounding consent and use, researchers are still working on facial recognition technology. Can this sort of work be justified? We hear some of the debates going on in academia about this field of research.

Feature: The ethical questions that haunt facial-recognition research

25:02 What do researchers actually think?

Nature surveyed 480 researchers who have published papers on facial recognition, AI and computer science. The results revealed that many researchers think there’s a problem.

Health: Covid-19 Vaccine Threatened By Mistrust Of Science & Politicians

A vaccine for covid-19 could be rolled out before the end of the year. But a worrying rise in mistrust of vaccines threatens its effectiveness. Now & Next is a series from The Economist Films: https://films.economist.com/nowandnext/