Tag Archives: Law

Morning News: Police Reform 1-Year After George Floyd Murder

Protests have followed police killings in America with saddening regularity, but the scope of demonstrations following George Floyd’s murder may mark a turning point in how policing is monitored and regulated. 

We speak to Lee Merritt, an attorney for Mr Floyd’s family, and to our United States editor—asking how likely cultural and structural changes are to take hold.

Tours: The International Court Of Justice (ICJ), The Hague, Netherlands

This virtual tour of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) leads the viewers through the rooms of the Peace Palace used by the judges in carrying out their judicial functions.

FAQ ——

What is the International Court of Justice?

The Court is the principal judicial organ of the United Nations. It was established by the United Nations Charter, which was signed in 1945 in San Francisco (United States), and began work in 1946 in the Peace Palace, The Hague (Netherlands).

The Court, which is composed of 15 judges, has a twofold role: first, to settle, in accordance with international law, legal disputes between States submitted to it by them and, second, to give advisory opinions on legal matters referred to it by duly authorized United Nations organs and specialized agencies.

The Court’s official languages are English and French.

Who may submit cases to the Court? Only States are eligible to appear before the Court in contentious cases. The Court has no jurisdiction to deal with applications from individuals, non-governmental organizations, corporations or any other private entity. It cannot provide them with legal advice or help them in their dealings with national authorities. However, a State may take up the case of one of its nationals and invoke against another State the wrongs which its national claims to have suffered at the hands of the latter; the dispute then becomes one between States.

What differentiates the International Court of Justice from the International Criminal Court and the ad hoc international criminal tribunals?

The International Court of Justice has no jurisdiction to try individuals accused of war crimes or crimes against humanity. As it is not a criminal court, it does not have a prosecutor able to initiate proceedings. This task is the preserve of national courts, the ad hoc criminal tribunals established by the United Nations (such as the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals (IRMCT), mandated to take over residual functions from the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and from the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR)) or in co-operation with it (such as the Special Court for Sierra Leone and the Special Tribunal for Lebanon), and also of the International Criminal Court, set up under the Rome Statute.

Media: ‘The Law At The Center Of The Big Tech Debate In Congress’ (WSJ)

Leaders in government and tech want to rewrite a law that governs the internet. WSJ explains Section 230, how it shaped the modern internet, and what lawmakers and tech executives want to change.

Photo illustration: Carlos Waters/WSJ

Supreme Court Nominee: Judge Amy Coney Barrett ‘Her Background & Views’

Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s expected Supreme Court pick, has shared — in her own words — how she thinks justices should approach hot-button social issues. WSJ’s Jason Bellini reports.

Photo: Robert Franklin/South Bend Tribune via AP

Top Topics Podcast: Chief Justice Roberts And Court Rulings, Airlines

Axios TodayOver the last few weeks, the U.S. Supreme Court has handed down multiple setbacks to President Trump and conservatives on cases ranging from abortion to LGBTQ discrimination. Chief Justice John Roberts’ record shows he’s not siding with the left. Instead, he’s slowly but surely moving the court in a more conservative direction.

  • Plus, the airline industry suffers a gut punch. United Airlines warned thousands of employees to prepare for layoffs in October as air travel demand remains tepid.
  • And, the Black Lives Matter movement has gone global among sports teams.

Guests: Axios’ Sam Baker, Joann Muller and Kendall Baker

New Interviews: 86-Year Old Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (BBC Podcast)

BBC World Service The Documentary PodcastSupreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is the leading liberal Judge on the US Supreme Court. At 86 she has spent many decades fighting for women’s rights, including equal pay and access to abortion. A pioneer, this is a rare interview with a living legend. Razia Iqbal presents this special programme from New York as she receives the $1m Berggruen Prize for philosophy and culture.