Tag Archives: Inflation

Cover Preview: Barron’s Magazine – Nov 14, 2022

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Inside the November 14, 2022 issue:

A Used-Car Dealer Has Big ESG Backers. Some of Its Low-Income Customers Ran Into Problems.

A Barron’s investigation found pricey cars, registration delays, and other complaints.

The Midterms and the Markets Both Show It’s Time to Get Real

An Inflation Reading Sends Stocks Soaring as if It Were 2020

Tech Companies Won Big in the Midterm Elections. Here’s Why.

Oil Prices Could Jump in December. Energy Stocks Should Get a Jolt.

Inflation Tends to Linger. How Long This Time?

Cover Preview: Barron’s Magazine – Nov 7, 2022

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Inside Barron’s November 7, 2022 Issue:

A Legacy Is on the Line as Musk Takes Over Twitter

Love him or hate him, the Tesla CEO is about to show whether Twitter can take flight under his ownership. More than his billions are at stake.

Wishful Thinking Won’t Sway Fed on Rate Hikes. But a Recession Might.

A Divided Congress Might Not Be Good for Stocks This Time Around

As the Fed Leans Into Higher Rates, Investors Should Lean Into Fundamentals

Higher Interest Rates Alone Won’t Rein in Inflation. Here’s What Might.

Tech’s Next Problem: Businesses Are Cutting Back Too

Rising Inflation: The Shelter Index Explained

Changes in the housing market are often delayed in inflation data, which can make things difficult for the Fed. Housing is one of the most weighted categories when tracking inflation, but it’s also one of the most complicated to measure. WSJ’s David Harrison explains how the shelter index is calculated, and why it can muddy the inflation outlook for the Fed. Illustration: Laura Kammermann

Cover Preview: Harvard Magazine – Nov/Dec 2022

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Justice Elena Kagan, in Dissent

Ebbing trust in the Supreme Court, and what to do about it

The Off-Kilter Economy

Reckoning with inflation and its remedies

Energy-Saving, Low-Cost Air Conditioning

Two new technologies could provide an eco-friendly cooling solution.

World Economic Forum: Top Stories (Oct 7, 2022)

World Economic Forum top stories of the week: 0:15 – The World’s First flying 3D printer 01:32 – Your outer circle of friends is more important for your career than you think 02:47 – How high interest rates lower inflation 04:47 – This Swedish start up has developed an electric passenger plane

Previews: The Guardian Weekly – September 2, 2022

The cover of the 2 September edition of the Guardian Weekly.

Burn out: Inside the 2 September Guardian Weekly

The spiralling cost of living has been an increasingly urgent problem in the UK. But for many people, huge rises in energy bills are about to turn a difficult situation into an impossible one.

Covers: The Economist Magazine – July 23, 2022

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ESG is often well-meaning but it is deeply flawed. The industry is a mess and needs to be ruthlessly streamlined.

If you are the type of person who is loth to invest in firms that pollute the planet, mistreat workers and stuff their boards with cronies, you will no doubt be aware of one of the hottest trends in finance: environmental, social and governance (esg) investing. It is an attempt to make capitalism work better and deal with the grave threat posed by climate change. It has ballooned in recent years; the titans of investment management claim that more than a third of their assets, or $35trn in total, are monitored through one esg lens or another. It is on the lips of bosses and officials everywhere.

Preview: Times Literary Supplement – July 1, 2022

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@TheTLS – July 1, 2022. Featuring Kenneth Rogoff on inflation; @KuperSimon on the Tour de France; @natsegnit on the ultrawealthy; Terry Eagleton on Geoff Dyer; @amyhawk_ on Hong Kong; @scheffer_pablo on climate change in medieval literature – and more.

World Economic Forum: Top Stories Of The Week

This week The World Economic Forum are highlighting 4 top stories:

  • What is hyperinflation,
  • the impact of climate change on the Alps,
  • a record breaking super computer and
  • the world’s first autonomous ship.

The World Economic Forum is the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation. The Forum engages the foremost political, business, cultural and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas. We believe that progress happens by bringing together people from all walks of life who have the drive and the influence to make positive change.

Urban Living: Are U.S. Big Cities Still Worth It?

A cost-of-living crisis is unfolding in U.S. major cities. Inflation data shows that costs for items such as rent and groceries are increasing quickly across the Sun Belt and coastal superstar cities. Now years removed from the darkest days of the pandemic, people are asking: Is a return to the city worth it?

Metropolitan regions have sprawled in recent years, raising budget concerns and quality-of-life issues for the people who remain downtown. Meanwhile the absence of commuters is slowing the recovery in leisure and hospitality. Many renters believe that a cost-of-living crisis is brewing in America’s major cities.

New York City is showing up as a hotspot of rent inflation. The average rent for 1-bedroom apartments in Manhattan rose to $3,995 a month in May 2022 — a 41% increase from one year ago, according to Zumper. Sudden, double-digit rent spikes are hitting other hubs, including Chicago, Los Angeles, and Austin, Texas. Zumper data shows that growth is particularly strong in Sun Belt cities such as Miami, where rents have risen to $2,700 a month in May 2022, a 64% increase from a year prior. During the pandemic, workers left the largest U.S. cities.

Two years in, renters have returned but many commuters haven’t as companies negotiate the particulars of a return to the office. Public officials are concerned about lagging transit ridership in cities such as New York. Ed Glaeser, an economist at Harvard University, says cities are becoming more important — not less — in the age of remote work. “When you Zoom to work, you miss the opportunity to watch the people who are older, to watch what they’ve done and to learn from them,” he told CNBC in an interview.

But for renters, a return to increasingly expensive cities might seem like a raw deal, especially if they can do their jobs from home. Researchers say remote work limits firms’ ability to train new workers. Data produced by Microsoft’s workforce suggests that it is more difficult to share in-depth information remotely, which can produce silos within companies’ rank and file.

“A lot of these tech companies, they’re saying you can work remotely,” said Andra Ghent, a professor of finance at the University of Utah. “But, you know, in many cases, they’re also saying, like, we’re not going to pay you quite the same amount.” Many renters believe that a cost-of-living crisis is brewing in America’s major cities. New York City is showing up as a hotspot of rent inflation. The average rent for 1-bedroom apartments in Manhattan rose to $3,995 a month in May 2022 — a 41% increase from one year ago, according to Zumper.

Sudden, double-digit rent spikes are hitting other hubs, including Chicago, Los Angeles, and Austin, Texas. Zumper data shows that growth is particularly strong in Sun Belt cities such as Miami, where rents have risen to $2,700 a month in May 2022, a 64% increase from a year prior. During the pandemic, workers left the largest U.S. cities. Two years in, renters have returned but many commuters haven’t as companies negotiate the particulars of a return to the office.

Public officials are concerned about lagging transit ridership in cities such as New York. Ed Glaeser, an economist at Harvard University, says cities are becoming more important — not less — in the age of remote work. “When you Zoom to work, you miss the opportunity to watch the people who are older, to watch what they’ve done and to learn from them,” he told CNBC in an interview. But for renters, a return to increasingly expensive cities might seem like a raw deal, especially if they can do their jobs from home.

Researchers say remote work limits firms’ ability to train new workers. Data produced by Microsoft’s workforce suggests that it is more difficult to share in-depth information remotely, which can produce silos within companies’ rank and file. “A lot of these tech companies, they’re saying you can work remotely,” said Andra Ghent, a professor of finance at the University of Utah. “But, you know, in many cases, they’re also saying, like, we’re not going to pay you quite the same amount.”