Tag Archives: 2021

Extreme Sports: Wildest Red Bull POV Videos (2021)

We’re barely scratching the surface with these POV (point of view) videos from 2021 at Red Bull, we’ve had an epic year and some incredible projects, on skis, kayaks, bikes and in the air with some world firsts like flying a plane through a tunnel and flying through a volcano. We couldn’t include them all. Which one of these action clips is your favourite? Which should we have included? What should we do next year?

Previews: Science News Magazine – December 18

In 2021, COVID-19 vaccines were put to the test. Here’s what we learnedVaccines can’t single-handedly end the pandemic, but they are still essential in the fight against the coronavirus. By Science News Staff

Technology: Caltech In 2021 – The Year In Review

In January, researchers developed a cage-like vaccine platform called a mosaic nanoparticle that could help protect against multiple strains of coronavirus; obtained new insights into human decision-making using AI-trained networks playing video games; learned how tiny plants changed the planet nearly half a billion years ago; and studied chaotic systems using a camera that can take up to 70 trillion frames per second.

Meanwhile, the Institute announced that it would remove the names of known eugenics proponents from its buildings, honors, and assets.

February saw the historic landing of NASA’s Mars rover Perseverance on the Red Planet. The 2,263-pound rover, designed and operated by JPL, which Caltech manages for NASA, will spend two years investigating Mars’s Jezero crater, and will collect and cache samples of rocks and sediment for recovery by a subsequent mission.

Here on Earth, seismologists worked with optics experts to develop a method to use existing underwater telecommunication cables to detect earthquakesphysicists advanced the use of exotic materials for future ultrafast computers; and engineers perfected methods to place molecules in particular orientations at specific locations—work that paves the way for the integration of molecules with computer chips.

In March, Caltech researchers announced a non-invasive method that uses ultrasound to read and interpret brain activity related to the intent to move, a major step toward the creation of noninvasive brain–machine implants that can restore movement to paralyzed individuals; located Mars’s missing water; described a long-sought solution to “one of the most stubborn problems in math”; and explained how bacteria evolve resistance to antibiotics and how antibiotics help bacteria eat when nutrients are scarce.

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Housing: Why Rents Are Rising In The U.S. (CNBC)

Fresh numbers from the fall of 2021 suggest that rents will increase at a rapid pace in the coming years. That’s a problem for Americans; many spend 30% or more of their income on rent. A decade-long slowdown in house building is coming to a close, which could help renters.

But the new developments in construction are generally for high-end and luxury apartment units. Experts say the market conditions are pushing people further away from their jobs and weighing on the economy writ large. Market indicators suggest that rent hikes are coming in 2022.

Average rents for a one-bedroom apartment in the booming suburbs of Phoenix, Arizona, have more than doubled year over year, according to data from Apartment Guide. Meanwhile, rents in Manhattan have reached fresh records as life returns to the cities, according to Zumper.

The problems aren’t confined to the usual suspects, however. Rents for single-family homes across the country jumped more than 9% on average in August 2021 from the prior year, according to a report from the analytics firm CoreLogic.

Rents are moving fastest in the buzzy enclaves across the South and West. For Maria Arredondo, a teacher based in Austin, Texas, a sudden rent hike of nearly $400 forced her to make a move. “If I had signed the lease … it would be taking a lot of my savings. And so I decided to move to a new building, losing about 150 square feet,” she told CNBC. Mark Zandi of Moody’s Analytics said the strains on the housing construction market were building well before the pandemic took hold in the states.

“There’s a lot of evidence that the lack of housing closer to where the demand is and urban cores is having a meaningful negative consequence on long-term economic growth.“ Generous monetary and fiscal policies have juiced demand for goods and services coming out of the pandemic. All that extra money sloshing around the economy is bubbling up into the rent. The fresh demand is giving investors a reason to jump into the market.

Experts say that’s boosting desperately needed supply. But there’s a catch: The homes being built are priced into the high end of the market. As a result, the evidence suggests that renters will be paying more for shelter this decade.

Photo Exhibits: ‘Lights And Shadows’ In London (2021)

Magnificient adventures are captured in this selection of photographic firsts, some of the earliest images from each location, taken by world-renowned photographers including Gertrude Bell, Carleton Watkins, Isabella Bird, Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley.

The images all feature in the ongoing Lights and Shadows exhibition, organised by the Royal Geographical Society in London, and are taken from the society’s historic image collection, revealing something of the marked progress of photography between 1851 and 1962, as well as providing a useful reference for economic, environmental or climatic change that has happened since they were taken. Read more: https://www.newscientist.com/article/…

New Book Reviews: ‘A (Very) Short History Of Life On Earth’ By Henry Gee (2021)