Tag Archives: Road Trips

Culinary Road Trips: Calgary West To Canmore, Banff, Lake Louise & Back Again (9 Days, 250 Miles)

From a Bon Appétit magazine online article:

Bon Appetit CanadaWhile the drive from Calgary to Jasper can easily be done in a day, I recommend taking at least a week to travel there and back. That leaves plenty of time to find adventure off the main road, spend some nights in the backcountry, and explore each town along the route.

When it comes to eating, exploring, and slumbering in the best log cabins, here’s a road-tripping itinerary that’ll get you away from the crowds and out among those big rocks.

  • CALGARY – DAY 1: Eat, shop, and stock up on snacks in a city nicknamed “Cowtown” – The bureka plate from universally adored Sidewalk Citizen (618 Confluence Way SE, Calgary, AB) is an ideal breakfast—the sesame-topped, feta-filled pastry is stuffed with a fried egg and served with a lemony cucumber and tomato salad, a hefty spoonful of hummus, and the housemade green or red harissa.
  • CANMORE – DAY 2: See how they do afternoon tea Rockies style – For dinner in Canmore, Where the Buffalo Roam Saloon (626 Main St. #2, Canmore, AB) is an intimate candlelit bar and restaurant popular with locals.
  • BANFF – DAY 3: (Safely) scale a mountain, then go back in time

To read more: https://www.bonappetit.com/story/canadian-rockies-road-trip

 

Road Trip Adventures: The “Khar Us Nuur National Park” In Mongolia

From a Wall Street Journal online article:

A will to avoid traveling absurd distances had informed our itinerary, but in Mongolia, it seems, you can’t get anywhere without one hell of a journey. The arena for this particular expedition was the Khar Us Nuur National Park. Accessible by road from the dusty town of Khovd, itself a two-hour flight from the capital, Ulaanbaatar, the park spans a transitional zone between the Altai highlands and the Gobi Desert. In the company of our driver, Gala, my friend Marcus and I had set out to experience three of Mongolia’s predominant habitats—steppe, mountains and desert—in the space of one drivable circuit.

Khar Us Nuur National Park - Wall Street Journal Illustration by JOHN S. DYKES

WE HAD already been driving for three hours when the lake appeared in the heat-shimmer and the pink smear behind it resolved into sand dunes. I guessed it would be around 10 minutes until we reached the shore. Fifteen tops. We arrived at the water’s edge two hours later. On the empty plains of Western Mongolia, perspective is illusory, patience a necessity.

To read more: https://www.wsj.com/articles/a-road-trip-in-mongolia-bizarre-in-the-best-way-11572520659

Road Trip To Oxford: Ashmolean Museum, Bodleian Library And The Radcliffe Camera

After a brisk walk through the Arlington Row, a very nice breakfast awaited us in The Swan dining room.

The drive to Oxford from Bibury is 30 miles, but expect traffic in the last 5 miles. Allow an hour to get parked in one of the many underground parking areas, such as the Gloucester Green.

Our first stop was the Ashmolean Museum, which was remarkably uncrowded at 9:30 am this Wednesday morning. We paid to see the special exhibit “Last Supper In Pompeii” and it was outstanding.

We then walked the remaining floors to view the incredible Renaissance and European Art exhibits including paintings, sculpture, ceramics and musical instruments

The three Stradivarius violins and one guitar, along with other priceless instruments were one of a kind holdings of this world class museum.

We walked over the Bodleian Library and purchased tour tickets for 1 pm. The we walked over to University Church of Saint Mary the Virgin and paid to climb the tower to view all of Oxford but especially the Radcliffe Camera.

No one should visit Oxford and not climb the tower. Spectacular is the only descriptor. We climbed back down and walked the streets nearby until it was time for the tour. Our guide was an amazing woman who studied history at Cambridge before falling in love with the Bodleian.

The history of Oxford University is centered around the 600+ year construction and evolution of its world famous library. A must see.

We walked over to the Christ Church Picture Gallery for a quick viewing and then had late lunch at The Bear, a classically old pub down a small alley.

Great day!

Top Road Trips: Historic Columbia River Highway Was America’s “First Planned Scenic Roadway”

From a National Geographic online article:

Mount Hood OregonLong ago bypassed by an interstate, the skinny, two-lane Historic Columbia River Highway has seen little change since its completion in 1922 as the United States’ first planned scenic roadway. The route winds above Oregon’s Columbia River Gorge, taking in six state parks, seven waterfalls, and—on clear days—views of five mountain peaks, including Mount St. Helens. Breathtaking in any season, the highway is especially picturesque in spring, when endemic wildflowers bloom, and winter, when waterfalls freeze and massive icicles hang from graceful arched bridges.
Travel tip: At Crown Point, drivers stop at the Vista House, an elegant art nouveau observatory 733 feet above the Columbia River.