Opinion: Britain’s Perilous State, The Tik Tok Threat, Trumpism’s New DC Army

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, why Britain is in a dangerous state, why the world’s most exciting app is also its most mistrusted (10:49), and Trumpism’s new Washington army (18:38).

Colorado Ranches: 143-Acres On San Juan River

A classic “gentleman’s” property, the San Juan River Retreat offers approximately one mile of both banks of the designated “blue ribbon” San Juan River. It is rare for a smaller acreage property to offer such an abundance of the river’s main stem, control of both banks, excellent fishery for rainbows and browns, and all while offering high-grade fish habitat.

The property is complemented by a custom-built 3,100 square foot primary residence which is nicely appointed and complements the land, while not being overdone. A 3,500 square foot guest house and small shop provide room for guests and equipment storage/work area.

Water rights irrigate approximately 20 acres, and two wells provide domestic water. The land is diverse, presenting a mixture of old-growth cottonwoods lined along the river, productive irrigated meadows, mild topography, smaller areas of evergreen tree cover, and good habitat for migrating big game animals.

The San Juan River Retreat is located 16 miles south of Pagosa Springs, 30 minutes from Stevens Field FBO, and less than an hour from Wolf Creek Ski Area. https://hallhall.com/property-for-sal…

Astronomy: James Webb Telescope In The Cosmos

Decades of work, $10 billion in spending and nearly 14 billion years of cosmic history have brought us to this moment. The first science from the James Webb Space Telescope, the largest and most powerful observatory ever built. What questions will it answer? What new mysteries will discover? What will this new eye on the cosmos reveal? The telescope’s first science images will be out VERY soon. Here’s a quick look at what you can expect when they drop. For complete cover of the Webb, hit up: http://sciam.com/jwst

Art: Volcano Painting In Europe From 1780-1870

‘It is desirable for a Painter, at least once in his life, to witness the Eruption of a volcano.’ – Pierre-Henri de Valenciennes (1799). Join exhibition contributor Clive Oppenheimer, Professor of Volcanology at the Department of Geography at the University of Cambridge, and explore the ‘Volcanoes’ section of True to Nature. #TrueToNature is open at the Fitzwilliam Museum until 29 August 2022 https://fitz.ms/ttn

Preview: Architectural Review – July/August 2022

AR July/August 2022

For two and a half years, risks of contagion have justified restrictions on public life around the world, at times tipping towards punitive control and attacks on civil liberty. The essays in this issue examine some of the forces that encroach upon public spaces, whether they be the economic imperatives that govern late capitalist cities or anti‑democratic political regimes that grab common land. The affordances of public spaces are never singular and neither are their publics. The voices in this issue question assumptions about who – or what – the monolithic ‘public’ is, advocating spaces that make room for difference. Also featured are the commended projects of the inaugural AR Public awards, which take us from Paris, Dhaka, and Guiyuan Village in China, to Singapore, London and Bangkok. Public spaces are complex and often imperfect – a ‘versatile, if unevenly distributed, resourcescape’, to use Álvaro Sevilla-Buitrago’s phrase – but as the pandemic continues, it is crucial that designers and publics continue to negotiate them.

For two and a half years, risks of contagion have justified restrictions on public life around the world, at times tipping towards punitive control and attacks on civil liberty. The essays in this issue examine some of the forces that encroach upon public spaces, whether they be the economic imperatives that govern late capitalist cities or anti‑democratic political regimes that grab common land. The affordances of public spaces are never singular and neither are their publics. The voices in this issue question assumptions about who – or what – the monolithic ‘public’ is, advocating spaces that make room for difference. Also featured are the commended projects of the inaugural AR Public awards, which take us from Paris, Dhaka, and Guiyuan Village in China, to Singapore, London and Bangkok. Public spaces are complex and often imperfect – a ‘versatile, if unevenly distributed, resourcescape’, to use Álvaro Sevilla-Buitrago’s phrase – but as the pandemic continues, it is crucial that designers and publics continue to negotiate them.

Public

Keynote: Publicity, Álvaro Sevilla-Buitrago
Reputations: Michael Sorkin, Kate Wagner
Unceded land, unpublic use, Timmah Ball
Reclaiming Asunción, Laurence Blair
Pockets of promise in Gugulethu, Kathryn Ewing
Outrage: Legacies of Covid-19 in Shanghai, Flora Ng

Colombia Views: The Food & Culture Of Medellín

Medellín is the capital of Colombia’s mountainous Antioquia province. Nicknamed the “City of Eternal Spring” for its temperate weather, it hosts a famous annual Flower Festival. Modern metrocables link the city to surrounding barrios and offer views of the Aburrá Valley below. Sculptures by Fernando Botero decorate downtown’s Botero Plaza, while the Museo de Antioquia displays more of the Colombian artist’s work. 

Incredible food, amazing art, friendly people all nestled in a breathtaking landscape. Medellin was my first visit to South America, believe it or not and I was captivated by everything it and Colombia has to offer. We were joined by Medellin and Colombia food experts and enthusiast Gaston from Palenque tours to experience some of the lesser known Colombian food. Spoiler alert: it was all absolutely delicious. https://palenque-tours-colombia.com/

Morning News: Sri Lanka’s President Steps Down, Big Tech Firms, Peter Brook

Gotabaya Rajapaksa, Sri Lanka’s president, announced he will step down on Wednesday after protestors occupied Colombo, the country’s capital, over the weekend.

Whoever succeeds him will inherit a host of thorny economic problems. Why Europe’s big tech firms are well placed to weather a downturn. And remembering Peter Brook, an extraordinary theatre director who died at the age of 93.