Cover Preview: Science Magazine – June 17, 2022

The triumph and tragedy of the Higgs boson

Ten years ago, physicists found what they predicted. Little new has followed

Ancient DNA reveals Black Death source

Graves in Kyrgyzstan hold early victims of plague that swept medieval Europe

Studies tying weather extremes to global warming gain rigor

Record-shattering events spur climate attribution advances

Cover Preview: Outdoor Photography – June 2022

Outdoor Photography 282 Cover

In Outdoor Photography issue 280

Chris Frost captures the magic of Dorset’s hidden woods
Essential tips for successful mountain photography
James Roddie introduces the art of camera trapping
Vincent Munier discusses his stunning new nature film

+

Science: The Search For Alien Life In The Universe

The thought of finding alien life has fascinated people since the time of the ancient Greeks—but developments in astrobiology could be about to turn this possibility into reality. How do you hunt for life beyond Earth—and might this be the decade when we find it?

Chapters: 00:00 – Is there life beyond Earth? 00:56 – How has the search for life evolved? 02:36 – What signs of life are scientists looking for? 03:48 – What are biosignatures? 04:28 – How to find intelligent life 06:03 – How telescopes today have improved our search 07:52 – Expanding the search beyond Earth

Read more of Alok Sharma’s coverage on the search for life in space: https://econ.st/3zw1Hxt

Reviews: The Top New Travel Books For 2022


Cover of All the Way to the Tigers by Mary Morris
Anchor
All the Way to the Tigers: A Memoir

By Mary Morris ’77GSAS (2020)

When travel writer and novelist Mary Morris was badly injured in an ice-skating accident, she feared that her life of adventure was over. But a quote from Thomas Mann convinced her otherwise: “He would go on a journey. Not far. Not all the way to the tigers.” Thus began Morris’s three-year-quest — which does take her far, from Brooklyn to the jungles of India — to find a tiger in the wild. Like her much-lauded memoir Nothing to Declare, Morris’s latest book is a thoughtful, spiritual, genre-bending journey. 


Cover of Looking for Transwonderland by Noo Saro-Wiwa
Soft Skull Press
Looking for Transwonderland: Travels in Nigeria 

By Noo Saro-Wiwa ’01JRN (2012)

Noo Saro-Wiwa spent her childhood in the United Kingdom, traveling back to her native Nigeria only on summer vacations. But when she was nineteen, her father, a journalist and activist, was killed by Nigerian police. Saro-Wiwa returned to her homeland to reckon with her father’s legacy and try to understand the history of the nation that killed him. Part memoir, part family history, and part travelogue, it’s an intriguing (and surprisingly funny) look at a very complicated country. 


Cover of Come Fly the World by Julia Cooke
Mariner Books
Come Fly the World: The Jet-Age Story of the Women of Pan Am 

By Julia Cooke ’13SOA (2021)

There’s nothing glamorous about flying these days, so it’s extra fun to tag along with Julia Cooke back to the 1960s, the golden age of air travel, when working as a Pan Am stewardess was peak cool. Cooke tells five such women’s stories, which run the gamut from the enviable (shopping sprees in Paris and beach holidays in the Philippines) to the unbelievable (evading the KGB in Moscow and smuggling a newsreel out of war-torn Pakistan). 


Cover of Letters to Lillian and Travel Notebooks by Meyer Schapiro
Getty Research Institute
Meyer Schapiro Abroad: Letters to Lillian and Travel Notebooks 

By Meyer Schapiro ’24CC, ’35GSAS, edited by Daniel Esterman ’65CC (2009)

Meyer Schapiro is known as one of the twentieth century’s most accomplished art historians. But in 1926 and 1927, he was still a Columbia graduate student, studying abroad in Europe and the Middle East. The letters that he wrote to his then fiancée, Lillian, as well as the notebooks that he kept, are ripe with budding observations on art and politics and represent a fascinating time capsule of intellectual life nearly a century ago.


Cover of Wayfinding by M. R. O'Connor
St. Martin’s Press
Wayfinding: The Science and Mystery of How Humans Navigate the World

By M. R. O’Connor ’08JRN (2019)

Technology has made wayfinding — “the use and organization of sensory information from the environment to guide us” — almost obsolete. But before GPS, or even written maps, humans purposefully traveled great distances across the earth. Journalist M. R. O’Connor draws on disciplines from neuroscience to anthropology to explore how they did it. Her findings are fascinating, and so is her journey to reach them, which takes her to the Arctic tundra, the Australian outback, and the islands of the South Pacific. 


Cover of Secret Brooklyn by Michelle Young
Jonglez Publishing
Secret Brooklyn: An Unusual Guide

By Michelle Young ’12GSAPP and Augustin Pasquet (2019)

Michelle Young, an adjunct professor of architecture at Columbia, is the founder of Untapped New York, a website dedicated to the secret corners and hidden gems of America’s biggest city. So it’s no surprise that her guide to Brooklyn is equally full of treasures — things like the world’s oldest subway tunnel and a museum built into the hallway of a Williamsburg apartment building. It’s an indispensable resource for visitors and residents alike. 


Cover of Travel Brightly edited by Sarika Bansal
Sarika Bansal
Tread Brightly: Notes on Ethical Travel 

Edited by Sarika Bansal ’12SIPA (2021)

Editor Sarika Bansal is a true citizen of the world: she has lived on five continents, speaks four languages, and has traveled extensively. So she’s more than qualified to ask tough questions and offer wisdom about how to travel ethically. The essays and photos in her collection tackle topics like the ecological implications of cruise ships, the ways that study-abroad programs and “orphanage tourism” impact communities, and the role that privilege plays in exploration. It’s a timely wake-up call, with plenty of thoughtful ideas for the future. 


Cover of The Diver's Clothes lie Empty by Vendela Vida
Ecco
The Diver’s Clothes Lie Empty 

By Vendela Vida ’96SOA (2015)

One of the most alluring elements of travel is self-reinvention, an idea central to Vendela Vida’s captivating, mind-bending thriller. Upon arriving at her hotel in Casablanca, Vida’s heroine is robbed of her passport and all her belongings. Strangely liberated by the crime that stripped her of her identity, she starts posing as a famous film star, which takes her on a series of mysterious adventures. Vida’s writing is full of fun twists, and any armchair traveler will delight in her portrait of the sunbaked Moroccan city. 


Italy for the Gourmet Traveler by Fred Plotkin
Kyle Books
Italy for the Gourmet Traveler 

By Fred Plotkin ’80JRN (2014)

There are plenty of good reasons to travel to Italy, but for most people the food is high on the list. And Fred Plotkin — an expert on Italian opera and cuisine — is the consummate guide. He has tips on the best restaurants, gelato stands, markets, wineries, and olive-oil distilleries, from the bustling centers of Rome and Milan to tiny villages off most tourist-trodden paths. Plotkin is working with travel-guide guru Rick Steves on a new gastronomic guide to Italy, out in 2023. Until then, this fifth edition remains an excellent resource. 


Cover of Wanderlust by Elisabeth Eaves
Seal Press
Wanderlust: A Love Affair with Five Continents 

By Elisabeth Eaves ’99SIPA (2011)

Elisabeth Eaves lives by the notion that you can “go off into the world and let it carry you along.” Her memoir chronicles fifteen years of truly globe-spanning travel — from the busy streets of Cairo to the jungles of Papua New Guinea. Almost every new place comes with a romance, but Eaves is clearly reluctant to settle down with any of the men she meets. It’s a journey that will speak to anyone who craves the unknown and fears the mundane. 
 

Tourism & Climate Change: The Future Of Air Travel

Exotic destinations, or staycations? As we make choices like these, we ask ourselves: Will we ever be able to fly without feeling guilty again? This film examines the tourism business today, and asks how the industry envisages the future.

The pandemic brought the tourist industry to a standstill. But it also highlighted something we have long suspected: Namely, too much travel is bad for the environment.

Not only that, but tourism transforms entire regions – not always for the better. It profoundly impacts communities and often brings benefits for only a very few. But our wanderlust remains. So, do travelers have to decide between the two extremes: exotic destinations (and high carbon footprints) or holidays at home? Given the climate emergency, can we fly without feeling guilty? How environmentally damaging are cruises? And what does it mean to have a sustainable holiday?

This documentary examines an industry that had gotten ahead of itself, even before it was hit by the pandemic. We hear from mayors, tourism managers, a climate expert, an internet activist and a sociologist. The film travels to the European tourist hotspots of Barcelona, Venice and Dubrovnik. The tiny island of Palau in the Pacific Ocean demonstrates how sustainable travel can be sensibly organized, and a Parisian start-up develops a concept for virtual travel experiences.

Previews: New Scientist Magazine – June 18, 2022

New Scientist Default Image

What is time? The mysterious essence of the fourth dimension

The nature of time is a tricky notion to pin down. But whether it is a fundamental part of our universe or just an illusion has huge implications

COVER STORIES

FEATURES Could we ever go back in time? Relativity does not rule it out

FEATURES How do we sense time? The brain cells that order our memories

Cover Preview: Monocle Magazine – July/Aug 2022

Issue 155 cover

Where is the best place to live? What makes a city tick? How can we improve our lot? Monocle’s Quality of Life Survey has posed this question for the past 15 years and 2022’s July/August issue contains the latest. How does your city fare? Plus: hot looks, sunny stays and the perfect summer playlist.

City Views: Portland In Northwest Oregon (4K)

Portland, Oregon’s largest city, sits on the Columbia and Willamette rivers, in the shadow of snow-capped Mount Hood. It’s known for its parks, bridges and bicycle paths, as well as for its eco-friendliness and its microbreweries and coffeehouses. Iconic Washington Park encompasses sites from the formal Japanese Garden to Oregon Zoo and its railway. The city hosts thriving art, theater and music scenes.

Morning News: EU-Israel-Egypt Natural Gas Deal, Container Ship Storage

A.M. Edition for June 16. The European Union signed a natural-gas deal with Israel and Egypt on Wednesday in a bid to wean itself off Russian supplies by tapping into the gas riches of the eastern Mediterranean.

WSJ correspondent Dov Lieber in Tel Aviv explains the significance of the deal for Israel and Egypt, even if the agreement doesn’t allow the EU to make up for losses of Russian gas. Luke Vargas hosts.