Architecture: ‘Louis Sullivan – Invention Of The Skyscraper’ In 1897

Louis Sullivan, Bayard-Condict Building, 1897–99 (65 Bleecker Street, NYC), a Seeing America video speakers: Dr. Matthew A. Postal and Dr. Steven Zucker.

Louis Henry Sullivan was an Irish-American architect, and has been called a “father of skyscrapers” and “father of modernism”. He was an influential architect of the Chicago School, a mentor to Frank Lloyd Wright, and an inspiration to the Chicago group of architects who have come to be known as the Prairie School.

The Bayard–Condict Building at 65 Bleecker Street between Broadway and Lafayette Street, at the head of Crosby Street in the NoHo neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City is the only work of architect Louis Sullivan in New York City.

Historic English Manors: ‘Chanters House’ In Devon, “Cromwell & Coleridge”

The grandiose Chanters House, in Ottery St Mary, Devon, has astonishing links to history and literature: it was the place where Oliver Cromwell declared the Civil War, and where the Coleridge family created one of the West Country’s most impressive libraries.

It originally dates from the 14th century but first rose to national fame in the 17th century, when Oliver Cromwell hosted a meeting of local people in the dining room — and apparently declared the start of the Civil War from there.

A little more than a century later, the property became home to another illustrious family, the Coleridges, in whose hands it would remain for about two centuries. The Reverend John Coleridge was made headmaster of the Kings’ School in 1760 and brought his huge family to live in Ottery St Mary.

It was in the town that his youngest son, the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, was born in 1772. But it was his eldest son, James, a distinguished soldier married to local heiress Frances Taylor, who bought Chanters House in 1796 and turned it into the family’s home.

Still in use today, the 70-ft-long room houses the 22,000 books of the Coleridge collection in oak carved bookcases that occupy the entire ground floor of the house’s west wing.

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Nature: ‘Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge’, Valentine, Nebraska

Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge is located in the U.S. state of Nebraska and includes 19,131 acres. The refuge borders the Niobrara National Scenic River on the west and is managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Oceans: The Great White Shark Decline Off Cape Town, South Africa (BBC)

For years, one of South Africa’s great tourist attractions has been the opportunity to see great white sharks up close. But barely any great white sharks have been spotted off the coast of Cape Town, South Africa for two years now – where there used to be hundreds.

PODCAST: ‘THE FUTURE OF DRUG PRICE TRANSPARENCY’

Interview with Dr. William Feldman on a new federal price-transparency rule and legal challenges to efforts to increase access to pricing information.

William Feldman is a physician and researcher in the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Stephen Morrissey, the interviewer, is the Executive Managing Editor of the Journal.

Sunday Morning Podcast: World News From Zurich, London & Slovenia (Feb 14)

Monocle’s editorial director Tyler Brûlé, Eemeli Isoaho, Florian Egli and Chandra Kurt on the weekend’s defining discussion topics, with insights from our editors in London and Ljubljana.

Plus: the bestsellers in Amsterdam’s literature market.

Reviews: ’10 Best Electric Bikes Under $2,000′ (Video)

Looking for the best electric bikes for under $2000? Beginning only a fun fad and an interesting twist on the humble bicycle, electric bikes have seen a considerable rise in popularity over the past decade. Improved designs, high-capacity batteries, and fast charging capabilities have transformed the electric bike into a multi-billion-dollar industry. So, let’s check out our picks for the 10 best electric bikes in 2021, highly-rated and affordable, between $600 and $1699.

Sunday Walks: Along The Seine River In Paris (Video)

Filmed: February 14, 2021

The river Seine flows right through the heart of Paris bordering 10 of the 20 arrondisements. It was no accident that the city evolved around this gigantic avenue for commerce and transportation, or that the early Parisi tribes on the river’s island were attacked and overthrown by the Romans. This early coup took place on what was later to become some very prime real estate. At that time the river was called by it’s Latin name: Sequana. The river is still the chief commercial waterway and half of the water used in Paris still comes form the Seine. Don’t think about that when you look at the sick green water flowing under the bridge, or when your waiter brings you a glass of tap water.