Medicine: Scientists Grow ‘Mini-Organs’ To Repair Damaged Human Livers

Scientists have used a technique to grow bile duct organoids – often referred to as ‘mini-organs’ – in the lab and shown that these can be used to repair damaged human livers. This is the first time that the technique has been used on human organs. Funding provided by European Research Council, the National Institute for Health Research and the Academy of Medical Sciences

Science Podcast: Covid Questions Answered, Rocky Planet Formation

Science Staff Writer Jon Cohen joins host Sarah Crespi to take on some of big questions about the COVID-19 vaccines, such as: Do they stop transmission? Will we need boosters? When will life get back to “normal.” 

Sarah also talks with Anders Johansen, professor of planetary sciences and planet formation at the University of Copenhagen, about his Science Advances paper on a new theory for the formation of rocky planets in our Solar System. Instead of emerging out of ever-larger collisions of protoplanets, the new idea is that terrestrial planets like Earth and Mars formed from the buildup of many small pebbles.

City Views: The Streets & Sights Of Istanbul, Turkey

Istanbul is a major city in Turkey that straddles Europe and Asia across the Bosphorus Strait. Its Old City reflects cultural influences of the many empires that once ruled here. In the Sultanahmet district, the open-air, Roman-era Hippodrome was for centuries the site of chariot races, and Egyptian obelisks also remain. The iconic Byzantine Hagia Sophia features a soaring 6th-century dome and rare Christian mosaics.

Tours: ‘Top 10 Places To Visit In Argentina’ (Video)

Located in the southern region of South America in a large, elongated shape, Argentina was sparsely inhabited by a few indigenous tribes before Spain’s colonized it in the 16th and 17th centuries. Today, the country is an independent republic featuring varied landscapes from rich plains to thick jungle, majestic mountains, pastoral steppes and impressive glaciers. Here’s a look at the best places to visit in Argentina.

Investigation: Why The Emergency ‘911 System’ Is Broken’ (CNBC Video)

More than 80% of calls to 911 come from a cellphone and often from a high-rise. But the over 5,000 locally run 911 centers, or public safety answering points (PSAP) aren’t easily able to track those callers. Fixing the system could save more than 10,000 lives and $97 billion per year according to the FCC.

Major companies like Apple, Google, Motorola and startups like RapidSOS have tried to fill the technology gap, but so far, that’s not enough. Watch the video to understand the conundrum of a large and fragmented national system that is run and funded locally, and how the federal government may be its only hope for a complete overhaul. “We’re talking about diversity of equipment connecting across these IP networks in a very complex manner,” said Capt. Mel Maier of the Oakland County Sheriff’s Office in Michigan.

“And if there are proprietary interfaces anywhere in between there, they’re not going to be able to talk. … Our technology is continually trying to catch up and playing catch up.” A number of companies including Apple, Motorola and start-ups are trying to fill the technology gap. RapidSOS is a data integration platform that has been adopted free of charge in about 4,800 PSAPs. According to the company, it covers about 92% of the country and assists in 150 million emergencies per year.

“We’re just scratching the surface of the amount of data that we could be using,” said Michael Martin, CEO of RapidSOS. “We’re passing precise location for most 911 calls now. But you can imagine all the capabilities, like in a fire if your building could talk or if your device could detect a heart attack and immediately transmit that through.” According to Maier, who is also chairman of the Public Safety Next Generation 9-1-1 Coalition, the tech industry can’t do it on its own.

He says carriers also have a responsibility, especially when it comes to addressing the altitude problem. But in the end, he says, the federal government is needed. He’s hoping Congress will pass legislation for $15 billion toward a complete overhaul. In July, a $1.5 trillion infrastructure bill that included $12 billion toward 911 passed the House but stalled in the Senate.

Travel: ‘The Berkshires’ In Massachusetts (Video)

In The Berkshires, Massachusetts, drive down roads framed by thick, multicoloured woods, explore giant white-washed mansions surrounded by endless fields and groves and sip cold brews at independent coffee shops with a backdrop of rolling, cloud-topped hills. Long sought out by eminent writers and jaded New Yorkers as a rustic base, this rural region has the ingredients for an all-American hideout.

The Berkshires is a rural region in the mountains of western Massachusetts dotted with villages and towns. A popular vacation destination, it’s known for outdoor activities, fall foliage–viewing, a farm-to-table food scene and thriving arts institutions. Renowned annual festivals include the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s residency at Lenox’s Tanglewood Music Center.

Aerial Views: ‘Zyuratkul National Park, Russia’ (4K)

Zyuratkul National Park is a Russian national park established in 1993 in the southern part of Satkinsky Raion (Chelyabinsk Oblast, Urals). The park lies about 30 km south of Satka and 200 km west of Chelyabinsk.

Notable features include Zyuratkul’ Lake, a rare mountainous body of water for the Urals 754 m above sea level, with a surface area of 13,2 km2 and a maximum depth of 8 m. Water is slightly mineralised (≈50 mg/L). Because of its clear water and spectacular landscape around, Zyuratkul’ is often called “Ural Ritsa“.[1]