Tag Archives: Probiotics

Health: ‘What Influences Gut Microbiome’ (Video)

The microbiota is a dynamic community that evolves through the lifetime of an individual, being influenced by multiple factors. Nutrition is essential in the process of establishing a healthy gut microbiome, with a key role of breastfeeding in early months, and important role of diverse diet to stimulate maturation of diverse gut microbiome.

Prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics are key tools to boost the development of an age-appropriate microbiota and its related benefits, like healthy immune development and a basis for a resilient microbiota throughout life.

Healthy Diets: Probiotic- and Prebiotic-Rich Foods

With a focus on maintaining a healthy gut by incorporating probiotic- and prebiotic-rich foods into your diet, Chef Jeffrey Held at NYU Langone makes plant-based miso soup with wild mushrooms, bok choy, and soba noodles, topped with boiled eggs.

Study: “Probiotic Drink” Developed That Thwarts Antibiotic Resistance

From a Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News online article:

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News logo“We were able to show that if you can stop the plasmid from replicating, then most of the bacteria lose the plasmid as the bacteria grow and divide. This means that infections that might otherwise be hard to control, even with the most powerful antibiotics available, are more likely to be treatable with standard antibiotics.”

journal.pone.0225202.g001
Fig 1. Anticipated exploitation of pCURE as a probiotic treatment for at-risk individuals. Before treatment, plasmids carrying antibiotic resistance genes are shown as purple circles. After treatment, target plasmids are replaced by pCURE (green circle) which could be engineered to later “self-destruct”. Note that not all gut bacteria carry resistance plasmids but pCURE can enter all Enterobacteriaceae as well as other bacteria. Reduced resistance levels in the gut decrease the chance of treatment failure when infections elsewhere in the body (eg lungs or urinary tract) arise from gut bacteria.

 

Researchers headed by a team at the University of Birmingham in the U.K. have developed a probiotic drink containing genetic elements that are designed to thwart antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in gut bacteria at the genetic level. The drink targets small DNA elements called plasmids that carry antibiotic resistance genes, and which are able to replicate independently and spread between bacteria. By preventing these plasmids from replicating, the antibiotic resistance genes are displaced, effectively resensitizing the bacteria to antibiotics.

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Health Podcasts: Interview With “Seed” Microbiome Company Co-Founder Raja Dhir

Raja Dhir is the co-founder of microbiome company Seed. Based in LA, Seed is a collective of scientists and doctors, researching how bacteria can improve human health and that of our planet. Its first product, a daily synbiotic, focuses on the stomach.

Raja Dhir is a life sciences entrepreneur and Co-Founder of Seed, a venture-backed Seed Co-Founder Raja Dhir from Seed websitemicrobiome company pioneering the application of bacteria for both human and planetary health. He leads Seed’s R&D, academic collaborations, technology development, clinical trial design, supply chain, and intellectual property strategy.

Together with Dr. Jacques Ravel, he Co-Chairs Seed’s Scientific Advisory Board–an interdisciplinary group of scientists and doctors who lead research teams and teach at institutions including the teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School and the Trial Innovation Unit of Mass. General Hospital (MGH). Raja has designed clinical trials with leading academic institutions including the teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School and the Trial Innovation Unit of Mass. General Hospital (MGH).

Raja has unique expertise translating scientific research for product development with a track record that includes patented inventions to stabilize sensitive compounds to improve alpha-diversity of the gut microbiome (derived from micro-algae) and most recently, the co-invention of microbial technologies to protect honeybee populations (Apis mellifera) from neonicotinoid pesticides and pathogen colonization. His work also includes biofermentation and scale-up for both facultative and strict anaerobic organisms.

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2020 Beverage Trends: Expect New Omega-3, More Probiotic & Lacrose-Free, & Less Juice-Based Drinks

From an Imbibeinc.com online release:

2020 Beverage Trend Predictions Imbibe Drink TankOmega-3s have a variety of health benefits that consumers want. Consuming omega-3s is suggested to help fight against depression, anxiety, mental decline and heart disease as well as promote brain health during early child development. Expect several omega-3 enhanced beverages in 2020.

Many consumers are reducing their intake of beverages once lauded for having nutrient benefits like orange juice and dairy milk, so there’s a lot of opportunity for brands to fortify products with vitamins and minerals. Expect to see beverages fortified with zinc, calcium, potassium, sodium, and vitamins B-12, C, and D.

Awareness about the advantages of a healthy microbiome for overall health has increased significantly over the last decade. Since prebiotics and probiotics both play an important role in maintaining a healthy gut, expect several launches of synbiotic beverages (i.e. have prebiotics and probiotics).

To read more: https://imbibeinc.com/food-and-beverage-industry-media/blog-postings-from-the-drink-tank/trendspotting-2020-trend-predictions

Healthy Diet Podcasts: “Are Probiotics Safe for Your Immune System?” (Scientific American)

From a Scientific American online release:

Nutrition Diva Health Diet PodcastOne of the immune system’s jobs is to protect us from harmful bacterial. And the beneficial organisms that we refer to as probiotics contribute to this effort in a number of ways. In the gut, a robust population of beneficial bacteria can help crowd out harmful bacteria, making it harder for them to thrive. In addition, probiotic bacteria can influence the activity of our own immune cells, regulating inflammation, barrier function, and cell-to-cell signaling. 

One way to foster healthy intestinal bacteria is to eat more of the foods these bugs like to eat—namely, fiber.  Increasing your intake of plant fibers from vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole grains, nuts, and seeds is like filling a bird-feeder with the kind of seeds that the beautiful songbirds you want attract like best. If you feed them, they will come!

And if we want to attract a lot of different types of songbirds—er, bacteria—then we want to put out a variety of foods. That means you don’t just want to get all your fiber from a single source, such as a fiber supplement. You want to get it fiber from lots of different kinds of vegetables, fruits, legumes, grains, nuts and seeds.

To read more: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/are-probiotics-safe-for-your-immune-system/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=weekly-review&utm_content=link&utm_term=2019-11-13_top-stories&spMailingID=60991971&spUserID=MjUxMzc4MzQ1MzMyS0&spJobID=1761811419&spReportId=MTc2MTgxMTQxOQS2