Tag Archives: Engineering

Megaprojects: Norway’s ‘Stad Ship Tunnel’ (Video)

Norway’s grand plan to build the world’s first full-scale ship tunnel is finally going ahead. This is how it’ll be done.

It’s been talked about for years, but now the Stad Ship Tunnel has finally been approved and work will start in 2022. Costing over USD $300M and taking three-to-four years to complete, the project will see a new mile-long shipping route carved under the Stadhavet peninsula at its narrowest point.

Now, we’ve built tunnels for boats before – like on the Canal du Midi in France, but the Norway project takes things to a whole different level – after all there’s a pretty big difference between a small tourist boat and a cruise ship.

Measuring 37 metres high by 26.5 metres wide, and with a depth of 12 metres, the tunnel will be big enough for ships up to 16,000 tonnes to pass through.

This crazy project is the answer to a problem that’s existed for more than a thousand years. Quite literally since the time of the Vikings, traversing the Stadhavet Sea has meant a treacherous journey for boats.

Views: How Singapore’s ‘Gardens By The Bay’ Was Constructed (Video)

The ‘Gardens by the Bay’ are home to 100,000 thriving plants–but for the entire setup to work, the designers had to figure out a way to protect the eerily-designed structures against the strong winds that hit Singapore.

The Gardens by the Bay is a nature park spanning 101 hectares in the Central Region of Singapore, adjacent to the Marina Reservoir. The park consists of three waterfront gardens: Bay South Garden, Bay East Garden and Bay Central Garden.

Construction: Top Ten ‘Megaprojects’ Of 2021

Top 10 construction megaprojects completing in 2021! In this video, we go over the largest megaprojects in the world! For more skyscraper & megaproject content be sure to subscribe to Top Luxury. Thanks for watching this video: Top 10 Megaprojects Completing this Year

Aviation: ‘Top Ten New Planes Of 2021 & Beyond’

Despite the recent disruption in air travel, engineers have never stopped working on more technological aircraft that will be reshaping the way we traverse the skies during the third decade of the 21st century. The end goal of the new planes are cleaner and more efficient propulsion systems, better flight autonomy and safety, and surely added in-flight comforts when it comes to passenger jets. In today’s episode we will be exploring the latest aviation news and model introductions,

Future Of Energy: ‘Tiny Nuclear Reactors’ (Video)

Nuclear energy accounts for nearly 20% of electricity generated in the US, more than wind, solar and hydro combined. But now, new nuclear reactor designs could bring far more widespread use and public acceptance of this powerful form of energy.

X-energy is an American private nuclear reactor and fuel design engineering company. It is developing a Generation IV high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor design.

History: ‘The Building Of The Erie Canal’ (1817-1825)

The Erie Canal is a 363-mile waterway that connects the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean via the Hudson River in upstate New York. The channel, which traverses New York state from Albany to Buffalo on Lake Erie, was considered an engineering marvel when it first opened in 1825.

The Erie Canal provided a direct water route from New York City to the Midwest, triggering large-scale commercial and agricultural development—as well as immigration—to the sparsely populated frontiers of western New York, Ohio, Indiana, Michigan and points farther west. The canal transformed New York City into the young nation’s economic powerhouse, and in 2000 the U.S. Congress designated the Erie Canal a National Heritage Corridor.

Science Podcasts: Beetle’s Strong Exoskeleton Helps Engineers, Covid-19 Trials

The structure of a beetle’s super-strong exoskeleton could open up new engineering applications, and efforts to address diversity and equality imbalances in academia.

In this episode:

01:17 Insights into an armoured insect

The diabolical ironclad beetle has an exoskeleton so strong, it can survive being run over by a car. Researchers have identified how the structure of the exoskeleton provides this strength, and show that mimicking it may lead to improved aerospace components.

Research Article: Rivera et al.News and Views: Diabolical ironclad beetles inspire tougher joints for engineering applications

10:42 Coronapod

This week, the UK government announced plans to run a ‘human challenge trial’, where healthy volunteers are deliberately infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus. We talk about the process, the ethical and procedural hurdles, and whether such an approach will provide any useful data.

News: Dozens to be deliberately infected with coronavirus in UK ‘human challenge’ trials

22:46 Research Highlights

A method to assess the age of RNA, and how southern elephant seals helped to identify supercooled seawater.

Research article: Rodriques et al.Research article: Haumann et al.

25:20 Efforts to address equity in science

Julie Posselt has been investigating the efforts of academic institutions to assess ingrained imbalances in diversity and equality. We talk to her about these efforts and her new book on the subject.

Book review: How to get more women and people of colour into graduate school — and keep them there

31:43 Briefing Chat

We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, back pay for female professors at Princeton, and a newly uncovered superpower for the tiny tardigrade.