Category Archives: Engineering

Cities: The Skyscraper Boom In Toronto, Canada

Canada’s biggest city is experiencing a skyscraper boom. Toronto, the capital of the province of Ontario, is a major Canadian city along Lake Ontario’s northwestern shore. It’s a dynamic metropolis with a core of soaring skyscrapers, all dwarfed by the iconic, free-standing CN Tower. Toronto also has many green spaces, from the orderly oval of Queen’s Park to 400-acre High Park and its trails, sports facilities and zoo.

Engineering: Sabah Al Ahmad Sea City, Kuwait

In this city almost every resident has their own beach access on a lagoon that leads directly into the sea. But constructing such a city meant overcoming tremendous engineering problems.

Sabah Al Ahmad Sea City is a city in Khiran Kuwait built with canals forming 200 kilometres (120 mi) of artificial shoreline. The city houses up to 250,000 residents.[1][2] The city was inaugurated in mid 2016.[3][4] The artificial islands that make up the area are unusual because they were built excavating large channels in desert land rather than using reclaimed land. The city is considered a pioneering project in the region due to its environmentally sustainable construction techniques.[5][6]

The first phase of the project was opened to the sea in 2004.[5] The multi-billion dollar development is within a 25 year construction period with ten phases.[1] Sabah Al Ahmad Sea City is the first urban area in Kuwait built entirely by the private sector.

Robot Design: Boston Dynamics ‘Spot’ Demo

Over the last few years, we’ve seen our customers make huge strides in what they’ve been able to accomplish with Spot – including collecting thousands of data points to drive predictive maintenance models, building comprehensive digital twins of their construction sites, and keeping workers away from dangerous or hazardous situations. We can’t wait to see what they’ll be able to do next.

Want to learn more about Spot? Discover Spot’s latest features: https://blog.bostondynamics.com/doing…

MIT Engineering: The Design Of Living Things

In MIT class, 2.788 Mechanical Engineering and Design of Living Systems students explore how mechanics, structure, and materials intersect with biology by studying butterflies at every stage of their metamorphosis. Associate Professor Ming Guo and Associate Professor Mathias Kolle take a cross-disciplinary approach to introduce students to the engineering behind biological systems.

Cities: 50-Year Plan To Halt Flooding In Copenhagen

As the sea level rises on the shores of Copenhagen—likely by at least a foot and a half by the end of the century—the city will become more vulnerable to flooding during storms. So the government is now making plans to take a drastic step as part of its plan for protection: Over the coming decades, it will build an artificial island to hold the rising water back, while doubling as room for new housing.

Cities: Dubai’s Radical 2040 Urban Master Plan (Video)

The Dubai 2040 Urban Master Plan maps out a comprehensive plan for a sustainable urban development in Dubai. It focuses on enhancing people’s happiness and quality of life and reinforcing Dubai as a global destination for citizens, residents and visitors over the next 20 years.  

The plan has a strategic structural layout, integrating all urban development master plans in the emirate and aligned it with Dubai’s strategic economic priorities and the needs of the future.

Dubai 2040 Urban Master Plan is the seventh development plan for the emirate since 1960. Between 1960 and 2020, the population of Dubai has multiplied 80 times from 40,000 in 1960 to 3.3 million while the urban and built area of the emirate increased 170-fold from 3.2 square km.

Airports: How Chicago O’Hare Was Redesigned

Available space, weather and air traffic volume are key factors that go into airfield design. Robert Hoxie, who helped redesign Chicago O’Hare’s airfield, explains how runways are mapped out. Photo Illustration: Adele Morgan/The Wall Street Journal

Book Review: ‘Building The Brooklyn Bridge, 1869 – 1883’ By Jeffrey Richman

The Brooklyn Bridge has been an indelible part of the New York City skyline for 140 years. When it was completed in 1883, it was hailed as an engineering marvel and called the Eighth Wonder of the World. It also linked what were then two of America’s largest cities — New York and Brooklyn. The story of its construction is a drama in itself and now a new book, “Building the Brooklyn Bridge,” gives readers an inside view of the 14-year construction process that has been largely out of sight, until now. Michelle Miller has the details.