Tag Archives: Container Ships

Container Shipping: How Maersk Managed Crisis

The global container business is in chaos. Surging consumer demand, covid outbreaks and a shortage of containers has led to higher volume for ocean carriers and congestion at ports.

Maersk, the world’s largest container shipper, has seen record profits. The Danish shipping firm whose customers include Walmart and Nike announced May 2021 first-quarter revenue of $12.4 billion, a 30% increase from a year earlier. Maersk has a fleet of over 700 ships and handles one in every five containers shipped by sea. The company also owns terminals around the world and has a growing land-based logistics business. On average a Maersk container ship calls on a port somewhere around the globe every six minutes.

Like its competitors the company has faced a series of obstacles in the first half of 2021 ranging from the worldwide shortage of shipping containers to the blockage of the Suez Canal. So, with vaccine rollouts in place in the U.S. and consumer discretionary spending shifting towards services will Maersk and its rivals be able to maintain their momentum? And what do bottlenecks at ports and higher freight rates mean for U.S. consumers? Watch the video to find out what’s next for Maersk.

Anaylysis: The Cargo Ship Bottleneck In L.A. (Video)

An average of 30 container ships a day have been stuck outside the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach just waiting to deliver their goods. The backlog is part of a global supply-chain mess spurred by the pandemic that means consumers could see delivery delays for weeks. Photo Composite: Adam Falk/The Wall Street Journal

Analysis: How ‘Physics’ & Rising Tides Freed Cargo Ship In The Suez Canal

It took seven days, heavy machinery and an international team of salvage workers, but it the end it was a force of nature – rising tides – that helped finally free the #Ever#Given​ cargo ship a week after it got stuck in the #Suez#Canal​ and blocked one of the world’s busiest waterways.

5 Top News Stories (Mar 30)

Five stories to know for March 30: The second day of Derek Chauvin trial, Egypt’s Suez Canal has moving traffic again, Myanmar protesters hold a ‘garbage strike,’ New York will expand its vaccine rollout to people who are 30 and older, and Amazon’s union vote enters the final stretch in a watershed moment for U.S. labor.

1. A professional mixed martial arts fighter who witnessed the deadly arrest of George Floyd is due to return to the stand on for the second day of testimony in the trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin. Watch live: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XVzUN…

2. Shipping was on the move again in Egypt’s Suez Canal after tugs refloated a giant container ship which had been blocking the channel for almost a week, causing a huge build-up of vessels around the waterway.

3. Rubbish piled up on the streets of Myanmar’s main city after activists launched a “garbage strike” to oppose military rule as the toll of pro-democracy protesters killed by security forces since a Feb. 1 coup rose to more than 500.

4. New York will expand eligibility for the COVID-19 vaccine to people who are 30 and older, and will make it available to anyone from age 16 and above on April 6, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced.

5. The votes on whether to form a union at Amazon’s sprawling Alabama fulfillment center are set to be reviewed, with momentum for future labor organizing at America’s second-largest private employer hanging in the balance.

Morning News Podast: George Floyd Murder Trial, Suez Canal Ship

The trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd begins today in Minneapolis. 

The massive cargo ship that’s been stuck in Egypt’s Suez Canal is finally moving. And, Gun control activists want the Biden administration to make the issue a priority.

Ocean Transport: ‘Are Renewable Ships Possible?’

The shipping industry plays a critical role in the global economy, carrying approximately 90% of the total tonnage of world’s traded goods. Shipping propulsion has changed radically since the mid-19th century, from the renewable energy of sail power, to the coal power of steamships, to the predominance of heavy fuel oil and marine diesel oil. But renewable energy technologies could transform the global shipping fleet again, at all levels and scales.