Tag Archives: Art Institute of Chicago

Art Exhibits: ‘Cezanne’

This video offers a look at Cezanne’s unique approach to color, form, and space through specialized imaging of a few of the artist’s most influential works in the Art Institute’s collection: The Basket of Apples, The Three Skulls, and The Vase of Tulips.

Cezanne May 15, 2022–Sep 5, 2022 https://www.artic.edu/exhibitions/928…

Reviews: ‘The Week In Art’

This week: is heritage in Ukraine being attacked and looted, and what can be done to protect it?

Ben Luke talks to The Art Newspaper’s museums and heritage editor, Tom Seymour, who has been to the Ukrainian-Polish border with the International Council of Museums (ICOM), to witness museum materials being sent into Ukraine to help institutions there. Then, Tom talks to Sophie Delepierre, the head of heritage protection at ICOM, about the organisation’s efforts in Ukraine and elsewhere.

As a major exhibition of the work of Paul Cezanne opens at The Art Institute of Chicago, ahead of its journey to Tate Modern later in the year, Ben talks to Gloria Groom and Caitlin Haskell, the curators of the Chicago exhibition. And for this episode’s Work of the Week, our acting digital editor, Aimee Dawson, asks Oliver Lanzenberg, the grandson of the artist Nicola L., about his grandmother’s work Gold Femme Commode (1969/1993). The piece is part of a show at Alison Jacques, one of a number of exhibitions opening to coincide with the second edition of London Gallery Weekend.

Tom’s full report into ICOM’s work for Ukraine is in the next print edition of The Art Newspaper and online soon.

The organisation Sophie mentions is NEMO, the Network of European Museum Organisations, ne-mo.org.

Cezanne, The Art Institute of Chicago, 15 May-5 September; Tate Modern, London, 5 October-12 March 2023.

Nicola L., Alison Jacques, London, until 23 July.

London Gallery Weekend, 13-15 May.

Art: ‘Beyond The Surface’ – Monet’s “Changing Light”

This video takes an in-depth look at Monet’s approach to painting in series, an approach that consumed his later years. From stacks of wheat in the French countryside to sites of foggy London to water lilies at his home garden in Giverny, Monet painted beloved subjects again and again, depicting changing light and atmospheric conditions in works that captivate us still today. New scientific discoveries, however, reveal that Monet’s genius goes well beyond what we see on the surface.

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Top New Art Exhibitions: “Monet And Chicago” (Art Institute Chicago Videos)

Monet And Chicago Sep 5, 2020–Jan 18, 2021

Learn how the changes Monet made to this painting captured the seaside town he remembered from his youth rather than the tourist destination it had since become.

https://www.artic.edu/exhibitions/903…

Art Video: “American Gothic” By Grant Wood (Art Institute Chicago)

On this episode of Art Institute Essentials Tour, take a closer look at American Gothic, painted by Grant Wood in 1930. One of the most famous American paintings of all time, this double portrait by Grant Wood debuted at the Art Institute in 1930, winning the artist a $300 prize and instant fame. Wood intended this Depression-era canvas to be a positive statement about rural American values during a time of disillusionment.

Grant DeVolson Wood (1891-1942) was an American painter best known for his paintings depicting the rural American Midwest, particularly American Gothic, which has become an iconic painting of the 20th century. 

ARTWORK VIDEO TOUR: Gustave Caillebotte’s “Paris Street; Rainy Day”

On this episode of Art Institute Essentials Tour, take a closer look at Paris Street; Rainy Day, painted by Gustave Caillebotte in 1877. This complex intersection represents in microcosm the changing urban milieu of late nineteenth-century Paris. Considered the artist’s masterpiece, Caillebotte strikingly captured a vast, stark modernity, complete with life-size figures strolling in the foreground and wearing the latest fashions.

Artwork Video Tour: Joan Mitchell’s “City Landscape” (Art Institute Chicago)

Joan Mitchell
Joan Mitchell (1925-1992)

On this episode of Art Institute Essentials Tour, take a closer look at City Landscape, painted by Joan Mitchell in 1955. “I paint a little, then I sit and look at the painting, sometimes for hours. Eventually, the painting tells me what to do.” In City Landscape, a tangle of various colors—pale pink, scarlet, mustard, sienna, and black—evoke the streets of a bustling metropolis. The spontaneous energy conveyed in the composition is at odds with Mitchell’s slow and deliberate process.

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Artwork Tours: “Bathers By A River” – Henri Matisse (Art Institute Chicago)

On this episode of Art Institute Essentials Tour, take a closer look at Bathers by a River, started by Henri Matisse in 1909 and completed in 1917. Henri Matisse originally painted this work as a pastoral scene, but over the next decade he transformed it into the cubist-inflected composition seen today. When the painting was acquired by the Art Institute in 1953, Matisse told the museum’s director that he viewed the painting as one of his five most pivotal works.

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Henri Émile Benoît Matisse (1869 -1954) was a French artist, known for both his use of colour and his fluid and original draughtsmanship. He was a draughtsman, printmaker, and sculptor, but is known primarily as a painter.

Museum Tours: “The Old Guitarist” By Pablo Picasso (Art Institute, Chicago)

On this episode of Art Institute Essentials Tour, take a closer look at The Old Guitarist, painted by Pablo Picasso between late 1903 and early 1904. In the paintings of Picasso’s Blue Period (1901-04), the artist restricted himself to a cold, monochromatic blue palette, flattened forms, and emotional, psychological themes of human misery and alienation. This painting reflects the then twenty-two-year-old Picasso’s personal struggle and sympathy for the plight of the downtrodden.

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Artwork Tours: Vincent Van Gogh’s “The Bedroom” (Art Institute Chicago)

On this episode of Art Institute Essentials Tour, take a closer look at The Bedroom, painted by Vincent van Gogh in 1889. Vincent van Gogh painted three versions, including this one, of his bedroom in the “Yellow House” in Arles, France. To van Gogh, this picture symbolized relaxation and peace. However, to our eyes the canvas seems to teem with nervous energy, instability, and turmoil—an effect heightened by the sharply receding perspective.

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