Top Political Podcasts: Tamara Keith And Amy Walter Discuss The Latest News From Washington

PBS Newshour Tamara Keith and Amy Walter Aug 26 2019NPR’s Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join Lisa Desjardins to discuss the latest political news, including recent poll and fundraising numbers for the remaining 2020 Democrats, whether former Rep. Joe Walsh can mount a serious primary threat to President Trump and what the economy and trade tensions mean for Trump’s favorability ratings.

Remote Travel: Northern California’s “Lost Coast” Attracts Visitors Who “Hike, Fish & Beachcomb”

From a New York Times article by Elaine Glusac

A view of the ocean from the Lost Coast Trail in northern California. Depending on the tides, some sections of the trail are periodically impassable.CreditCreditAlexandra Hootnick for The New York TimesNow, visitors come to the Lost Coast to hike, fish, beachcomb, bird-watch and scan the ocean for migrating whales in the offshore marine preserve (Ms. Kaai recommended visiting on a weekend, when Shelter Cove’s few restaurants are open). Others come to backpack along the famous Lost Coast Trail-North, a nearly 25-mile beach trek that generally takes three days, requires a permit (free, with a $6 reservation fee) and is subject to tides that periodically make portions impassable.California Lost Coast map by The New York Times

On a deserted beach in Northern California, I mistook a sea lion for driftwood. The Lost Coast is deceiving that way. Wild things appear tame and tame things, like the paved road my family and I took to get here, wild.

In June, seeking immersion in nature, we visited the Lost Coast, the largely roadless shore between the indiscernibly tiny town of Rockport and the Victorian charmer Ferndale, about 100 miles apart by inland roads. Here in Humboldt County, California reaches its westernmost point near a junction of three seismically active tectonic plates. The King Range mountains plunge into the sea, deterring road-builders from continuing State Route 1 along the ocean.

To read more  click on the following link: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/26/travel/northern-california-lost-coast.html

History Of The Cell Phone: Motorola Beat Bell Labs To Engineer The First Wireless Phone In 1973

From an InterestingEngineering.com online article:

Martin Cooper of Motorola made the first publicized handheld mobile phone call on a prototype DynaTAC model on April 3, 1973. This is a reenactment in 2007.
Martin Cooper of Motorola made the first publicized handheld mobile phone call on a prototype DynaTAC model on April 3, 1973. This is a reenactment in 2007.

With encouragement from his boss, Motorola’s chief of portable communication products John Mitchell, Cooper and engineers at Motorola produced the working prototype for the first cell phone. On April 3, 1973, before stepping into a news conference in Manhattan to demonstrate the new device that would go on to revolutionize communications, Cooper placed the first cell phone call in history.

While cell phones are a fairly modern invention–if you consider 1973 ‘modern’–the idea of a telephone that could travel with you is as old as the telephone itself. For decades though, the best anyone could offer were bulky two-way radio devices that were essentially walkie-talkies that filled the trunk of your car, but a couple of key engineering developments and a classic American business rivalry would help lay the foundation for the device that revolutionized the way people communicate.

To read more click on the following link:

https://interestingengineering.com/the-history-behind-the-invention-of-the-first-cell-phone?_source=newsletter&_campaign=RllbMNnzxME2k&_uid=46dBBxnxd7&_h=0c209d493fa27bb2c39469a873cbbd733289c833&utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=mailing&utm_campaign=Newsletter-25-08-2019

Top Food Experiences: Farmstead “Farm-To-Table Restaurant At Blackberry Farm In Walland, TN

From a Jetsetter.com online article:

Blackberry Farm Tennessee Farm to table dishesEnjoy the fruits of their labor during dinner at Farmstead, the James Beard Award-winning restaurant, known for its hyper-seasonal dishes like thyme-basted golden beets and hen of the woods mushrooms drizzled with pine syrup.

As one of the pioneers in the farm-to-table movement, Blackberry Farm is better suited for traveling foodies who’d rather roll up their sleeves in the garden than idle all day by the pool. On a pastoral 4,200-acre farm and estate in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains, the food here has a real sense of place: ingredients are tilled from the gardens, milk and cheese is provided from the livestock, and wild mushrooms and blackberries are foraged from the surrounding area. Even the award-winning craft brewery utilizes sour cherries and persimmons picked right off the grounds.

http://www.blackberryfarm.com/wine-food/