Tag Archives: Hiking

Top Travel Destinations: Hiking And Viewing The Fall Colors On Mackinac Island, Michigan

From a Michigan.org online article:

Mackinac-Island-Fall-ColorsThere are over 140 miles of trails and roads leading to great views on Mackinac Island. Stop by the Visitor’s Center to buy a map of the trails, significant points of interest and self-tours. Or visit a rental bike shop for a map, (though these have less detail). One of the most popular trails is the 8.2-mile road along the island’s perimeter. Typically there are bikers along this trail, but plenty of pedestrians also use it to see the beautiful shorelines. The road is not very hilly but it is long, so take your time to enjoy the views and be sure to stop occasionally to read about the history of the island. If you’d like to get deeper inland, there are several trails that lead to great views of the changing reds, yellows, and oranges as well as vantage points to see the beautiful shorelines. Stay aware of bikers and horses and be sure to stop at Sugar Loaf, Fort Mackinac, Skull Cave or Arch Rock for amazing views.

To read more: https://www.michigan.org/article/trip-idea/pure-michigan-hiking-trails-see-brilliant-fall-colors

Remote Travel: Northern California’s “Lost Coast” Attracts Visitors Who “Hike, Fish & Beachcomb”

From a New York Times article by Elaine Glusac

A view of the ocean from the Lost Coast Trail in northern California. Depending on the tides, some sections of the trail are periodically impassable.CreditCreditAlexandra Hootnick for The New York TimesNow, visitors come to the Lost Coast to hike, fish, beachcomb, bird-watch and scan the ocean for migrating whales in the offshore marine preserve (Ms. Kaai recommended visiting on a weekend, when Shelter Cove’s few restaurants are open). Others come to backpack along the famous Lost Coast Trail-North, a nearly 25-mile beach trek that generally takes three days, requires a permit (free, with a $6 reservation fee) and is subject to tides that periodically make portions impassable.California Lost Coast map by The New York Times

On a deserted beach in Northern California, I mistook a sea lion for driftwood. The Lost Coast is deceiving that way. Wild things appear tame and tame things, like the paved road my family and I took to get here, wild.

In June, seeking immersion in nature, we visited the Lost Coast, the largely roadless shore between the indiscernibly tiny town of Rockport and the Victorian charmer Ferndale, about 100 miles apart by inland roads. Here in Humboldt County, California reaches its westernmost point near a junction of three seismically active tectonic plates. The King Range mountains plunge into the sea, deterring road-builders from continuing State Route 1 along the ocean.

To read more  click on the following link: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/26/travel/northern-california-lost-coast.html

New Books On Hiking: “50 Hikes In Eastern Massachusetts” Lists Boston & Cape Trails

From a BarnesandNoble.com listing:

50 beautiful trails around Boston and the Cape

In this first-edition guide, Madeline Bilis shares her years of outdoors experience in the Boston area, providing 50 hikes for people of all skill and experience levels. While the Berkshires tend to get all recognition when it comes to hiking in Massachusetts, the eastern part of the state is packed with treasures for lovers of the outdoors.

Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary 50 Hikes in Eastern Massachusetts book

From the rocky ledges of the Blue Hills Reservation to the sandy stretches of the Cape Cod National Seashore, incredible trails and vistas abound in this varied region. In addition to stunning natural views, you’ll delight in discovering dozens of small towns, cultural attractions, and historical sites during your adventures around Boston and the Cape.

Hikes include:

Noanet Woodlands

Myles Standish State Forest

Great Island Trail

Middlesex Fells Reservation

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/50-hikes-in-eastern-massachusetts-madeline-bilis/1130420101?ean=9781682683521#/

Top Hikes In Oregon: The 7-Mile Loop Trail To Ramona Falls Features Stunning Views Of Mount Hood

From a Willamette Week online article:

Ramona Falls Trail View of Mount HoodIt’s not quite Multnomah Falls in terms of Disneyland wow factor, but it’s up there. Bear in mind that some things are justifiably popular—and Ramona Falls is just such a place. It is one of those natural wonders that must be seen in person. Photos, good as they may be, do the sprawling cascade little justice. Accordingly, the approximately 7-mile loop hike that visits it is a rite of passage for any and all Oregon hikers—including dirt-caked and determined adventurers trudging their way along the Pacific Crest Trail, which joins a portion of this route.

Ramona Falls Oregon Hiking Map

You’ll have to ford the Sandy River or cross on downed logs (a bridge was washed out several years ago), so exercise caution. But the view of Mount Hood from that vantage point is a stunner, so that’s a plus. In addition, the walk beside Ramona Creek looks and feels more like a forested fantasyland than a hiking trail—and if ever there was a place to enjoy a picnic, it is in the large, shaded amphitheater surrounding the cooling mist of the falls.

Top Hikes In Washington: Discovery Park In Seattle Is An “Urban Gem” Located On The Puget Sound

From a Curbed.com online article:

Located in the corner of northwest corner of Magnolia, Discovery Park is an urban gem. The former Army Post has forest, meadow, a beach, a lighthouse, and old officer housing. And you can get there via the 19, 24, and 33 Metro buses.

Discovery Park Seattle Map

The classic choice is the 2.8-mile Loop Trail which takes you through the woods and meadows to the park’s literal and figurative highpoint: a bluff overlooking Puget Sound that offers a great view of the downtown skyline. If you’re looking for more you can drop down to the beach and lighthouse before hiking back up to the Loop Trail.

To read more click on following link: https://seattle.curbed.com/maps/best-seattle-day-hikes-trails

Top Travel Experiences: Remote Lakeside Camping In The Adirondack Park Reached By Floatplanes

From a New York Times article by Zach Montague:

The Adirondack Park In Upstate New York MapAway from Lake Placid, Lake George and other more crowded regional hubs, are several smaller hamlets that provide access to a handful of exceptionally remote lakeside campgrounds reachable only by pontooned floatplanes. With round-trip charters typically priced at $150 or less per person, some of the most secluded frontiers of the Adirondack Park are accessible even to travelers on a limited budget. Over the years, this little-utilized route into sequestered backwoods sites has become a prized secret among my close friends and family, and since my maiden trip with my father six years ago, I have been back every year with a rotating cast of companions.

An Adirondack Wilderness All Your Own New York Times July 2019
A floatplane arrives at the isolated Pine Lake camping site in the Adirondacks. Credit Tony Cenicola/The New York Times

To read more click on following link: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/22/travel/an-adirondack-wilderness-all-your-own.html

Top Hikes In California: Bothe-Napa Valley State Park Offers Redwoods & Views From Coyote Peak

From a Curbed.com online article:

Bothe-Napa Valley State Park CampingRising on the west side of Napa Valley, the Mayacamas Mountains are best known for producing costly cabernets for wineries like Mayacamas and Mount Veeder. But they’re gorgeous, too, as this sprawling state park proves. For a beautiful, medium-challenging hike, follow the Redwood, Ritchey Canyon, South Fork and Coyote Peak trails on a 5-mile loop that leads through coast redwoods and up Coyote Peak to Instagram-worthy views. Then sit and snack on the sandwiches you got at Sunshine Foods in nearby St. Helena.

State Park website: https://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=477

To read more click on following link: https://sf.curbed.com/2019/7/24/20700994/best-hiking-trails-napa-wine-country-day-trips