“The Wizard Of Oz” (1939) May Be The Most Influential Baby Boomer Film Of All-Time

From “The Guardian”:

The Wizard of Oz at 80“…from Elton John’s albumGoodbye Yellow Brick Road to the Coen brothers’ O Brother, Where Art Thou?, which owes as much to Oz as it does to Homer’s Odyssey. Joel Coen once said: “Every movie ever made is an attempt to remake The Wizard of Oz.” In his 1992 essay about Fleming’s film, Salman Rushdie describes it as his “very first literary influence”. It was one of Derek Jarman’s favourite movies, and among the first he ever saw. (This is the key to its influence: the fact that everyone watches it in childhood. It seeps into your unconscious and stays there.) And there are the spin-offs, sequels and prequels – The WizReturn to OzOz the Great and PowerfulWicked.”

Eighty years ago, in the summer of 1939, 16-year-old Judy Garland appeared on cinema screens as the orphan Dorothy Gale, dreaming of escape from bleak, monochrome Kansas. “Find yourself a place where you won’t get into any trouble,” her aunt beseeches, too busy for poor old Dorothy, who soon breaks into song: “Somewhere, over the rainbow, skies are blue / And the dreams that you dare to dream really do come true”. Her wish is soon granted by a tornado that carries her to the gaudy, Technicolor Land of Oz, instilling her as an icon for misfits, migrants, gay kids, dreamers – anyone who has ever wanted to run away.

Read more by clicking the following link:

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/jun/17/how-the-world-fell-under-the-spell-of-the-wizard-of-oz

Boomers Health Care: Interview With Chief Of Palliative Medicine At UCSF Medical School


Palliative Medicine UCSF“Doctors and patients are increasingly recognizing the benefits of palliative care. People want care that helps them live as well as possible for as long as possible. Once people learn what palliative care is, they want it. So we’re training experts to meet this growing demand. We have one of the largest fellowship programs in the state, and we also train nursing students, medical students, and residents. We want all clinicians to know the basics of palliative care: how to manage pain, shortness of breath, and nausea and how to talk to patients about the things that matter most to them.”

What is palliative care?

It’s medical care focused on improving the quality of life for people with serious illnesses. If you’re facing heart failure, cancer, dementia, ALS, or another such disease, we can help you live as well as possible for as long as possible. Palliative care is not about dying but, rather, about living.

Read more at: tinyurl.com/yxslx5v4

Boomers Health Care: Chronic Conditions Will Be Increasingly Treated By Medical Virtualists

“Virtual care has great potential for the routine treatment of chronic conditions, as well as minor acute illnesses like rashes and ear infections. Digital sensors already make it possible to monitor blood glucose, heart rhythm, blood pressure, temperature, and sleep.”

The Virtualist Health CareFrom time immemorial, an invariable feature of doctor–patient interaction has been that it takes place in person. But the status quo is changing. A large portion of patient care might eventually be delivered via telemedicine by virtualists, physicians who treat patients they may never meet.

The burden of disease has changed dramatically in the past century, shifting from acute infectious illnesses to chronic diseases. Clinic visits are poorly suited for the treatment of chronic diseases, yielding only single-point measurements of labile, continuous variables like blood pressure. Within the time constraints of an office visit, it can be difficult for the physician to make an accurate diagnosis, much less educate the patient about treatment and self-care. And after the patient leaves the doctor’s office, only limited monitoring of the condition is usually possible, without a return visit.

The Lancet
Read more at The Lancet:

New Museum Exhibitions: Metropolitan Museum Of Art Features “The Moon In The Age Of Photography”

Apollo's Muse The Moon In the Age of Photography CatalogOn July 20, 1969, half a billion viewers around the world watched as the first images of American astronauts on the moon were beamed back to the earth. The result of decades of technical innovation, this thrilling moment in the history of images radically expanded the limits of human vision.

Celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, Apollo’s Muse: The Moon in the Age of Photography surveys visual representations of the moon from the dawn of photography through the present. In addition to photographs, the show features a selection of related drawings, prints, paintings, films, astronomical instruments, and cameras used by Apollo astronau

JULY 3–SEPTEMBER 22, 2019

Metropolitan Museum of Art

https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2019/apollos-muse-moon-photography

Boomers Health Podcast: “Fragility Fractures” And Treatment Options (UCTV)

UCTV Health and MedicineFragility fractures occur in structurally weak bones due to aging and bone loss – osteoporosis. Dr. Anthony Ding explains what “fragility fractures” are, where they occur, what they mean to you, and how they are treated. Series: “Mini Medical School for the Public”.

Culinary Arts: The Highly Specialized World Of A Water Sommelier

Water Sommelier Article“How would he describe water, then? It’s the stuff of life. A fantasia of flavour. It is the world in a glass. Riese’s water menus (yes, there are such things) offer everything from water “harvested from icebergs freshly carved off glaciers in the remote fjords” of Norway, to 600m-year-old prehistoric water from Australia. It is also, on occasion, a trifle pricey. A bottle of that glacier water will set you back $150.

He’s not a tap-water man then? On the contrary. To shun tap water is, Riese thinks, a snobbism. He himself drinks a lot of “the tap”. Unless he’s in New York of course. Or California. Or Majorca. And he didn’t much like it in Barcelona, either. Copenhagen, however, apparently has “incredible” tap water. As a general rule of thumb, Riese says, northern taps taste better.”

Specialized Water Menu The Economist 1843 Magazine

Economist 1843 Magazine

Read more in 1843 Magazine: https://www.1843magazine.com/and-finally/firstworldproblems/do-you-know-a-good-water-sommelier

 

 

Books For Boomers: “The Plaza” By Julie Satow Is “Social History At Its Best”

“In this definitive history, award-winning New York Times journalist Julie Satow not only pulls back the curtain on Truman Capote’s Black and White Ball and The Beatles’ first stateside visit — she also follows the money trail. THE PLAZA reveals how, during the Great Depression, it was a handful of rich, dowager widows who were the financial lifeline that saved the hotel, and how foreign money and the anonymous shell companies of today have transformed the iconic guest rooms into condominiums shielding ill-gotten gains — hollowing out parts of the hotel as well as the city around it.”

The Plaza Julie Satow

Read more about the book: http://www.juliesatow.com/the-plaza-wip

Investment Portfolios: Health Care Stocks For Boomers To Invest In

“To cash in on these long-term trends, we scoured the sector and found eight good opportunities. The stocks we like fall into three broad health care areas: drugmakers, health care service providers, and medical device and equipment manufacturers. Their share prices may continue to bounce around, especially as we near the 2020 elections. Smart investors will buy more when shares dip. “If you have flexibility and you can pick your spots, you can make money,” says Matt Benkendorf, chief investment officer at money management firm Vontobel Quality Growth.”

  • Merck (symbol MRK, price $83) is an elder statesman in the pharma world that should continue to thrive in the new order. Keytruda, Merck’s immunotherapy drug that basically gets the immune system to kill cancer cells, is “rapidly becoming one of the largest products we’ve ever seen,” says JPMorgan Chase analyst Christopher Thomas Schott.
  • Neurocrine Biosciences (NBIX, $84) is expected to be profitable in 2020. It has two drugs on the market and a strong pipeline of therapies in all stages of development. One of its commercial drugs, Ingrezza, is a “best in class” therapy for tardive dyskinesia, a condition that causes jerky, involuntary face and body movements, says Credit Suisse’s Seigerman. He thinks it could fetch annual sales of $2 billion by the early 2020s.
  • CVS Health (CVS, $54) aims to give UnitedHealth a run for its money. It’s best known for its drugstores—70% of people in the U.S. live within three miles of a CVS pharmacy—but it operates more than 1,000 walk-in clinics, too. With its acquisition of Aetna in late 2018, CVS is now also an insurer.
  • After spinning off its drug division in 2013, Abbott Laboratories (ABT, $82) now focuses on a diverse roster of products that includes nutritional drinks, diagnostics, generic drugs and medical devices. But a trio of new products put it in the sweet spot of the health care sector’s innovation surge, says William Blair’s Golan. 

Read more in Kiplinger’s: https://www.kiplinger.com/article/investing/T052-C000-S002-9-health-care-stocks-for-your-portfolio.html

Health Care Stocks for Boomers to Invest in

Boomers Healthy Sleep: Listen To Stephen Fry Read ‘Blue Gold’ About Southern France (Calm)

Stephen Fry is a national treasure in Britain, an Emmy winner, and the narrator of all 7 Harry Potter books.

About Sleep Stories: Calm created a natural sleep aid, in the form of bedtime stories for grown-ups called Sleep Stories.

Visit the “Calm” website for more information:

https://www.calm.com/narrators/41FcQWqIX/stephen-fry

Modern American “Road Trips” Began With Henry Ford And Thomas Edison “Autocamping” In 1920’s

“By the mid-1920s, the term “autocamper”— describing drivers whose trips were long enough to necessitate stops at night to camp —entered the national lexicon. Thanks were due in large part to Henry Ford and three of his friends: the inventor Thomas Edison, the tire-company magnate Harvey Firestone and the naturalist and author John Burroughs.”

Ford_Edison_Harding_and_Firestone_New_York_Times_1921

  • “…when Ford and Edison, joined by Firestone (one of Ford’s major suppliers) and Burroughs (Ford enjoyed his books and essays on nature), set out on their summer car trips, Americans were eager to share every moment. The Vagabonds’ car-and-truck caravan was routinely followed by packs of journalists and film crews, the latter often hired by Ford. In theaters, feature films were proceeded by news “shorts,” and audiences enjoyed watching Ford perform basic roadside repairs and Edison snooze beside a campfire…”

Wall Street Journal

Read more in the Wall Street Journal:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-invention-of-the-summer-road-trip-11561780860

News, Views and Reviews for the 55+