Tag Archives: Dinosaurs

Research Preview: Nature Magazine – Nov 10, 2022

Volume 611 Issue 7935

nature – Inside November 10, 2022 issue:

A natural experiment shows electric scooters really do cut traffic

A US city’s crackdown inadvertently reveals the vehicles’ value.

Extra-strength mRNA vaccine fends off a bevy of flu strains

A vaccine upgraded to target four influenza proteins instead of the usual one protects mice against a range of viral variants.

How the dinosaur got its long neck: slowly

A Brazilian fossil suggests that the super-stretcher necks of Argentinosaurus and its ilk evolved gradually rather than in a rush.

Sounds of the stars: how scientists are listening in on space

In astronomy, the use of sound instead of light is breaking down barriers to participation and providing insight into the Universe.

Research Preview: Nature Magazine – Oct 27, 2022

Volume 610 Issue 7933

Research Highlights

Research Preview: Nature Magazine – Oct 13, 2022

Volume 610 Issue 7931

Had COVID? A delayed booster might lead to a better response

People vaccinated not long after being infected with SARS-CoV-2 mount a weaker immune response than do those whose infections are well behind them.

This rare primate will not survive deforestation

Modelling suggests that tree cutting is a greater threat to the Milne-Edwards’s sifaka than are climate extremes.

Hydrogen could help China’s heavy industry to get greener

Providing the clean fuel to manufacturing plants would be a cost-effective way to tackle the country’s climate goals.

Dinosaur-killing asteroid set off colossal global tsunami

For the first time, scientists simulate the worldwide spread of the staggering wave triggered by the Chicxulub impact.

Research Preview: Nature Magazine – Sept 8, 2022

Volume 609 Issue 7926

Dinosaur distribution

The cover shows an artist’s impression of Mbiresaurus raathi, a newly discovered species of herbivorous dinosaur found in Zimbabwe and dating to around 230 million years ago.

Avalanches in remote peaks are revealed with old satellites’ aid

Archived data from Landsat 5, launched in 1984, and two newer sensors allow scientists to chart dangerous flows in Afghanistan.

Quick-dried Lystrosaurus ‘mummy’ holds clues to mass death in the Triassic

Reptiles that perished during a severe drought 250 million years ago are preserved as spreadeagled and mummified fossils.

Research Preview: Science Magazine – September 2

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U.S. to require free access to papers on all research it funds

The plan, to start at the end of 2025, is a blow to journal paywalls, but its impact on publishing is unclear

Carbon dioxide detected around alien world for first time

Webb telescope discovery offers clue to planet formation and promises insights on planetary habitability

Researchers tackle vexing side effects of potent cancer drugs

Wider use of checkpoint inhibitor therapy spurs efforts to predict and treat immune complications

Omicron shots are coming—with lots of questions

Decisions on boosters targeting subvariants will be based on limited data

Zimbabwe find illuminates dawn of the dinosaurs

Nearly complete specimen shows earliest dinosaurs needed a temperate climate

Morning News: Biden In Israel & Saudi Arabia, Latin America Sex Ed, Dinosaurs

Joe Biden lands in Saudi Arabia this morning, having spent two unremarkable days in Israel and the West Bank.

As president, he has been unusually disengaged from the Middle East, and will probably return home with little to show for his peregrinations. We survey the state of sex education in Latin American schools, and explain why dinosaurs outcompeted other species.

New Science Podcast: Lab-Grown Mini Brains, Herd Immunity & Bat Dinosaurs

The chances of mini brains becoming sentient, herd immunity, bat-like dinosaurs, and a UK government decision threatens gender diversity in academia.

In this episode:

00:59 The ethics of creating consciousness

Brain organoids, created by culturing stem cells in a petri dish, are a mainstay of neuroscience research. But as these mini-brains become more complex, is there the chance they could become conscious, and if so, how could we tell?

News Feature: Can lab-grown brains become conscious?

09:01 Coronapod

So called ‘herd immunity’ is claimed by some as a way to break the chain of infection and curtail the pandemic. However epidemiologists say that this course of action is ineffective and will lead to large numbers of infections and deaths.

News Explainer: The false promise of herd immunity for COVID-19

20:59 Research Highlights

Volcanic ash degrades ancient art in Pompeii, and the aerial ineptitude of two bat-like dinosaurs.

Research Highlight: The volcanic debris that buried Pompeii wreaks further destruction; Research Highlight: A dead end on the way to the sky

23:22 How cutting red-tape could harm gender diversity in UK academia

The Athena SWAN scheme, designed to boost gender-equality in UK academia, has proved effective, and has been exported to countries around the world. But now a decision by the UK government to cut bureaucracy could mean that institutions pay less heed to schemes like this and threaten future efforts to increase gender diversity in UK academia.

Editorial: Equality and diversity efforts do not ‘burden’ research — no matter what the UK government says

31:00 Briefing Chat

We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, oncologists discover a potential new human organ, and how re-examined fossils have given new insights into the size of baby tyrannosaurs.

Paleontology: Largest And Most Complete “T-Rex” Skeleton To Be Auctioned

Watch how we installed STAN — one of the most complete T. rex skeletons ever found.

Unearthed in 1987, less than a century after the existence of Tyrannosaurus rex had first become known, STAN — named after his discoverer Stan Sacrison — represents one of the most complete fossil skeletons of the most famous dinosaur species ever to have lived.

Each individual fossil from STAN’s skeleton had to be prised carefully from the rock, then stored and recorded. Following more than 30,000 hours of labour, STAN was erected on a custom mount to reflect his former glory. He was given a public unveiling on Hill City’s Main Street in South Dakota, followed by his global ‘debut’ as the centrepiece of Japan’s T. rex World Exposition in 1995.

Evolution Of Dinosaurs: “The Golden Age Of Paleontology” (Video)

With advancements in technology and access to areas once considered unreachable, the field of paleontology is experiencing a golden age of discovery. Roughly 50 new dinosaur species are found each year, giving us a closer look at their prehistoric world like never before. Our previous understandings of how dinosaurs looked and evolved are being revolutionized, especially in regards to evidence that modern birds descended from dinosaurs. But while it’s exciting to see how incredibly far paleontology has come from the previous generations, it’s equally as thrilling to imagine what new discoveries lie just ahead.