Food Review: “Hot Dogs” Originated As A “Seasoned Sausage Sandwich” At Coney Island In The 1860s

From BBC Travel article by Julia Hammond:

History of Hot Dog“As the newly opened Coney Island and Brooklyn Railroad brought many more people to the seaside from Manhattan in the late 1860s, customers told Feltman that they wanted to eat hot food, not cold clams, according to Richard F Snow, the former editor of American Heritage Magazine. So in 1867, Feltman called on the wheelwright who’d originally made his cart and asked him to modify it. The craftsman built a custom charcoal brazier for cooking sausages and a metal box for warming bread.”

If there’s any food that represents Americana, it’s the humble hot dog. Today, these bunned frankfurters are sold at every baseball game, grilled at nearly every backyard barbecue and available at roadside convenience stores from the Carolinas to California. In fact, this most archetypal of American foods originated as the US started to stitch itself back together in the 1860s following the American Civil War and forge its new identity. But while you can now find these seasoned sausage sandwiches across the American heartland, the hot dog’s iconic home is on the boardwalk at New York’s Coney Island.

Read more by clicking link below:

http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20190702-the-truth-about-the-us-most-iconic-food

Road Trips: Mendocino Coast Offers Wind-Washed Cottages, Wine, Redwoods And Artware

From Wall Street Journal article by Ryan Haase:

“With its wind-washed cottages and water towers, the town of Mendocino looks like it was built by a seafaring crowd rather than a tree-felling one, even though forestry was once big business here. After it faded by the 1950s, artists came in and now Mendocino pumps out pottery, paintings, glassware, jewelry and woodwork.”

Mendocino Road Trip

NORTHERN California’s coastal stretches have long lured roadtrippers, even before John Steinbeck, his wife, Elaine, and their peripatetic poodle rumbled down the Pacific Coast in 1960. In “Travels With Charley,” Steinbeck famously enthused about ogling the “ambassadors from another time,” referring to the region’s ancient redwoods. Last summer, as wildfires raged uncomfortably close to those redwood forests, four-wheeled vacationers steered clear. By the year’s end, fires burned more than half a million acres in Northern California alone, but largely spared the coastal woods and villages. Now that the smoke is clear and driving-vacation season is shifting into high gear, we’ve designed a detailed three-night itinerary. You set out from San Francisco, snake through Mendocino County and then on to Humboldt County, with the landscape growing wilder with each mile.

Read more by clicking link below:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-quintessential-california-road-only-better-11558701425

Boomers Home Design: 3D Printed Housing Will Reduce Costs And Construction Time, Improve Efficiency

From 3D Printing Media Network:

3D Printed Homes CyBe Construction“More than just demonstrating its ability to create 3D printed houses, the SRTI Park project also aims to reduce costs associated with construction. CyBe’s concrete 3D printers are developed for flexibility and speed—walls can be 3D printed in a single day—and do away with many of the costs of traditional construction methods.”

CyBe Construction, a Dutch specialist in concrete 3D printing, has been selected as the technology provider for a 3D printed house project in the UAE. The house will be built as part of the Sharjah Research, Technology and Innovation Park (SRTI Park) initiative which aims to 3D print a series of buildings in the area with the goal of transforming the city of Sharjah into an architectural hub.

The first 3D printed house of the SRTI Park project, supported by CyBe and the American University of Sharjah (AUS), is expected to be built by Q3 2019. The house will be constructed using CyBe 3D printing construction technology with the help of students, faculty and researchers from AUS, who will be trained in using the AM platform.

Read more below:

https://www.3dprintingmedia.network/cybe-construction-3d-print-houses-sharjah-uae/

Boomers Health: Routine Blood Test Leads To Unneeded Anxiety Over Elevated Liver Enzymes

Diagnosis Lisa Sanders MD NYT Magazine Liver Problems“The doctor asked whether he was sure that he had not taken anything else when he was sick? No acetaminophen? No herbs or supplements? The man was certain. Moreover, his labs were abnormal even before he took the antibiotics. The doctor hypothesized that the man’s liver had been a little inflamed from some minor injury — maybe a virus or other exposure — and the antibiotic, which is cleared through the liver, somehow added insult to injury.”

 

A few weeks before he got sick, he had blood tests for an application for life insurance. Days later, he heard from his doctor that his liver labs were a little off. There are enzymes in the liver that help with the organ’s work of cleansing the blood. When the liver is injured, these hardworking chemical assistants leak into the circulatory system. The levels of these enzymes, his doctor explained, were double what they should be.

Read more in the NY Times Magazine article by Lisa Sanders, M.D.:

https://tinyurl.com/yyar65pf

Boomers Political Podcast: David Brooks & Karen Tumulty Discuss This Week’s Political News

PBS Newshour Brooks and TumultyNew York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Karen Tumulty join Judy Woodruff to analyze the week’s political news, including President Trump’s Fourth of July celebration, political and cultural implications of the crowded detention centers on the U.S.-Mexico border and the latest dynamics within the race for the 2020 presidential nomination. (PBS Newshour – July 5)

TOP RV CAMPGROUNDS IN AMERICA: Slough Creek In Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

“The most primitive of Yellowstone’s campgrounds and sites, the accommodations are distributed among the banks of the stream, meadow land, and forest.” (Fodor’s Travel)

Slough Creek Campground Yellowstone Top Campground

Slough Creek Campground—elevation 6,250 feet (1905 m)—is located in Lamar Valley near some of the best wildlife watching opportunities in the park. Located at the end of a two mile graded dirt road, this campground is best suited for tents and small RVs. There are plenty of hiking opportunities in the area, including the Slough Creek Trail which begins nearby. Nighttime offers a quiet, unimpeded view of the stars and the possibility of hearing wolves howl.

https://www.nps.gov/yell/planyourvisit/sloughcreekcg.htm

(As rated by Fodor’s Travel)

“The Wizard Of Oz” (1939) May Be The Most Influential Baby Boomer Film Of All-Time

From “The Guardian”:

The Wizard of Oz at 80“…from Elton John’s albumGoodbye Yellow Brick Road to the Coen brothers’ O Brother, Where Art Thou?, which owes as much to Oz as it does to Homer’s Odyssey. Joel Coen once said: “Every movie ever made is an attempt to remake The Wizard of Oz.” In his 1992 essay about Fleming’s film, Salman Rushdie describes it as his “very first literary influence”. It was one of Derek Jarman’s favourite movies, and among the first he ever saw. (This is the key to its influence: the fact that everyone watches it in childhood. It seeps into your unconscious and stays there.) And there are the spin-offs, sequels and prequels – The WizReturn to OzOz the Great and PowerfulWicked.”

Eighty years ago, in the summer of 1939, 16-year-old Judy Garland appeared on cinema screens as the orphan Dorothy Gale, dreaming of escape from bleak, monochrome Kansas. “Find yourself a place where you won’t get into any trouble,” her aunt beseeches, too busy for poor old Dorothy, who soon breaks into song: “Somewhere, over the rainbow, skies are blue / And the dreams that you dare to dream really do come true”. Her wish is soon granted by a tornado that carries her to the gaudy, Technicolor Land of Oz, instilling her as an icon for misfits, migrants, gay kids, dreamers – anyone who has ever wanted to run away.

Read more by clicking the following link:

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/jun/17/how-the-world-fell-under-the-spell-of-the-wizard-of-oz

Boomers Health Care: Interview With Chief Of Palliative Medicine At UCSF Medical School


Palliative Medicine UCSF“Doctors and patients are increasingly recognizing the benefits of palliative care. People want care that helps them live as well as possible for as long as possible. Once people learn what palliative care is, they want it. So we’re training experts to meet this growing demand. We have one of the largest fellowship programs in the state, and we also train nursing students, medical students, and residents. We want all clinicians to know the basics of palliative care: how to manage pain, shortness of breath, and nausea and how to talk to patients about the things that matter most to them.”

What is palliative care?

It’s medical care focused on improving the quality of life for people with serious illnesses. If you’re facing heart failure, cancer, dementia, ALS, or another such disease, we can help you live as well as possible for as long as possible. Palliative care is not about dying but, rather, about living.

Read more at: tinyurl.com/yxslx5v4

Boomers Health Care: Chronic Conditions Will Be Increasingly Treated By Medical Virtualists

“Virtual care has great potential for the routine treatment of chronic conditions, as well as minor acute illnesses like rashes and ear infections. Digital sensors already make it possible to monitor blood glucose, heart rhythm, blood pressure, temperature, and sleep.”

The Virtualist Health CareFrom time immemorial, an invariable feature of doctor–patient interaction has been that it takes place in person. But the status quo is changing. A large portion of patient care might eventually be delivered via telemedicine by virtualists, physicians who treat patients they may never meet.

The burden of disease has changed dramatically in the past century, shifting from acute infectious illnesses to chronic diseases. Clinic visits are poorly suited for the treatment of chronic diseases, yielding only single-point measurements of labile, continuous variables like blood pressure. Within the time constraints of an office visit, it can be difficult for the physician to make an accurate diagnosis, much less educate the patient about treatment and self-care. And after the patient leaves the doctor’s office, only limited monitoring of the condition is usually possible, without a return visit.

The Lancet
Read more at The Lancet:

News, Views and Reviews for the 55+