Tag Archives: DW Euromaxx

Views: Places Inspiring ‘Lord Of The Rings’ & ‘The Hobbit’ By J.R.R. Tolkien

The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings – If you’ve read the British author J.R.R. Tolkien’s books before, or seen the movies, you’ll be familiar with the fantasy worlds he created. But where did the inspiration for these creations come from? To this day, this question is still widely debated. British author and Tolkien expert John Garth has embarked on a journey to find out.

Views: The Horseback Fisherwomen Of Belgium

The tradition of horseback fishing for fish and shrimp goes back to the 16th century. Large Belgian Draft horses trawl across the beach with fishing nets attached to their saddles. In Oostduinkerke, at the Belgian coast, this 500-year-old shrimping tradition has remained unchanged, except in 2015, when a small but significant change occurred: for the first time ever, 2 women joined the ranks of what was long considered a “man’s job”. We met up with the women who brave the waves on Belgians weighing up to 1 ton every day.

Art & Architecture: ‘The Pinault Collection’ – Paris

French billionaire François Pinault is not only one of the richest men in the world, he’s also an art collector of international renown. Now, he’s opening a museum for contemporary art in Paris. The new palace of art is located inside the former Bourse de Commerce, which has been redesigned by star architect Tadao Andō.

Arts Profile: ‘Cairde – Irish Riverdance Group’ (Video)

Cairde is a dance group that exemplifies Irish dance. As early as several thousand years ago the druids – high priests of the Celts – were said to have performed ritual group dances accompanied with music. This is possibly the root of the folk dances that later developed in Ireland to become part of the island’s cultural heritage. However, Cairde take a less traditional approach to Irish dance, aiming to give it a fresh image. These young men from Ireland have already received millions of clicks on their TikTok dance videos.

Arts & Culture: ‘The Azulejos’ – Portugal’s Colored Tiles (Video)

Anyone who has ever been to Portugal will probably know them: the small, mostly blue square ceramic tiles, the so-called ‘azulejos’. Especially in the capital of Lisbon they decorate many houses. Even today, the decorative tiles are still made by hand. The word azulejos does not come from the Portuguese word “azul” for blue – as one might think. It comes from Arabic and means something like “polished little stone”.

Profiles: ‘Marbled Paper’ Makers Of Florence, Italy

In the Italian city of Florence, high-quality colored paper and gift wrap have a long tradition. In fact, some of it is still made by hand. These papers are famous for their delightful patterns, shiny colors, and their Italian Renaissance-era motifs. We went to visit paper manufacturers in Florence to find out more about this age-old tradition!

Culinary: ‘Traditional German Foods & Dishes’

What do the Germans like to eat, what do traditional German dishes look like and how can you give the classic pork schnitzel a crunchy modern twist? Join Rachel for a delicious German feast, rounded off with the classic “Kaffee und Kuchen.”

Rachel moved from the UK to Germany in 2016. As a relative newcomer she casts a fresh eye over German clichés and shares her experiences of settling into German life. Every two weeks she explores a new topic – from unusual bans to meaty cuisine or haunted castles. This week: what’s on the menu in Germany?

Travel & Culture: ‘Chá Gorreana’ Tea Plantation, The Azores, Portugal

There are few parts of Europe that produce tea. The Azores, a Portuguese archipelago, are one of them. Here, tea is cultivated and processed without the use of chemicals. Chá Gorreana, located on the largest of the islands, is Europe’s oldest tea plantation. The family-run business has been producing black and green tea since 1883. DW reporter Hendrik Welling visited the plantation to learn about the fine art of producing Azores tea.

Arctic Travel: Iceland’s ‘Vatnajökull’ – Largest Glacier In Europe (Video)

Iceland truly is the land of fire and ice – aside from having some of the world’s most active volcanoes, it’s also home to Europe’s largest glacier: Vatnajökull. The Vatnajökull glacier stretches some 143 kilometers east to west, and over 98 kilometers north and south, holding a massive 3000 cubic kilometers of pure ice. As well as the breathtaking hiking routes across the glacier, there are also many beautiful blue ice caves to take you quite literally into the heart of the glacier. Our Euromaxx-Reporter Hendrik Welling went to Iceland to find out what makes this mountain of ice so amazing.

Vatnajökull is the largest and most voluminous ice cap in Iceland, and the second largest in area in Europe after the Severny Island ice cap of Novaya Zemlya. It is in the south-east of the island, covering approximately 8% of the country. 

Adventure Tours: British Photographer Qunitin Lake’s Walk Of 6830 Miles Around Coast Of Britain

British photographer Quintin Lake decided to hike around the coast of Britain on foot, which took him a total of 11,000 kilometres to complete. 180,000 photos are testament to his impressions from this extreme tour.