Tag Archives: 2020

The Arts: ‘Louvre Museum’ In Paris Revives As Visitors Drop 72% In 2020 (Video)

After six months of cumulative closure since the beginning of the health crisis and only a reopening for a few short months between two confinements this summer, the #Louvre​ lost 72% of attendance by 2020. But despite the absence of visitors, the heart of the museum has not completely stopped beating. The Louvre is even taking advantage of this period to carry out #renovations​.

Profile: ‘Ocean Cleanup’ – Ridding The World’s Oceans Of Plastic (Video)

The Ocean Cleanup, a non-profit organization, is developing advanced technologies to rid the world’s oceans of plastic.

Every year, millions of tons of plastic enter the oceans primarily from rivers. The plastic afloat across the oceans – legacy plastic – isn’t going away by itself. Therefore, solving ocean plastic pollution requires a combination of stemming the inflow and cleaning up what has already accumulated.

FOUNDED 2013

Dutch inventor Boyan Slat founded The Ocean Cleanup at the age of 18 in his hometown of Delft, the Netherlands.

NON-PROFIT FOUNDATION

We are a registered charity as a ‘Stichting’ in the Netherlands, and a 501(c)(3) in the US.

HQ ROTTERDAM

The Ocean Cleanup’s team consists of more than 90 engineers, researchers, scientists and computational modelers working daily to rid the world’s oceans of plastic.

Website

Timelapse Film: ‘Chasing The Storm III’ (4K Video)

Filmed and Edited by: Matt Hollamon

After some serious debate over this film and whether it would happen or if I should add content from 2021 to beef it up, I came to the conclusion that 2020 deserves it own place in my library. I fell in love with the music from the first sample and knew that it was exactly what I wanted, so it was on from there. The pace is slower and much more deliberate compared to my previous offerings, but it is a fantastic pairing with the footage I collected this year.

Chasing storms as a registered nurse during a global pandemic was a challenge to say the least. 2020 forced me to be adaptable. Safety for my family, friends, coworkers and most importantly my patients, turned into my top priority. I scrapped plans for my annual two week plains chase in May and just chased when I could, usually closer to home. That being said, I still managed to chase 24 or so different days, spanning from March to October. I made it to seven different states through all of it. I missed events like Sublette KS and Arnold NE that I normally would have seen with my own eyes, but at that time, I was where I needed to be. For me personally it seemed like 2020 was the year of the LP and the shelf cloud, not always what I’m looking for, but always beautiful to photograph and to time lapse. I saw my first birthday tornado in March when I turned 50 and two others for the year but didn’t have the chance to photograph any of them. Each of those 24 chase days, whether the day was epic or a bust, brought balance into my life and helped me to reset and be the best I could be in my professional life. So while it was not the year any of us were looking for, it’s the year that was, and still deserves its place. I will always be thankful for the experiences and blessings. This is my fourth season recap, and while content dictates quality to some degree, I feel like I am getting better at this as I go. I hope you enjoy it as much as I enjoyed making it, and thank you for taking the time to look.

2020 Election Polls: What Went Wrong? (Video)

A lot things went wrong in 2020. And presidential polls were no exception. Joe Biden was supposed to win the 2020 presidential by eight points, according to the polls, which were wrong. He won by five points. He was supposed to win Wisconsin by 10 points. Instead, Biden eked out a victory there with less than 1 percent of the vote between him and incumbent President Donald Trump. The polls were very wrong in Wisconsin. The polls also had Biden winning Florida. And North Carolina. Here’s why the polls ended up missing the mark in 2020, and what’s being done about it.

Aerial Views: Western U.S. And Southeast Asia (Video)

Filmed and Edited by: Jason Hatfield

This is the time of year myself and other photographers share our favorite photos from the past year. 2020 was obviously a very challenging time and despite struggles of my own I was vastly more fortunate than many. As I started to think on what were my favorite photographs I decided this time to share a film that conveys some of the incredible experiences and views I had. There’s so much more that happened but just these few minutes is enough.

Locations featured include: Colorado, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Wyoming, Oregon, Washington, Vietnam, Thailand, Myanmar, Indonesia

World News Podcast: Brexit Deal, A Look Back At 2020 And Forward To 2021

Georgina Godwin and guests set the tone for the weekend. Top news and a look back at 2020 and forward at 2021.

Scandinavian Travel: ‘Helsinki & Southern Finland’ (Video)

Filmed and Edited by; Jan Fröjdman

Many of us hope for brighter times these days, on many levels…
Filmed in Helsinki and the southern part of Finland.

Helsinki, Finland’s southern capital, sits on a peninsula in the Gulf of Finland. Its central avenue, Mannerheimintie, is flanked by institutions including the National Museum, tracing Finnish history from the Stone Age to the present. Also on Mannerheimintie are the imposing Parliament House and Kiasma, a contemporary art museum. Ornate red-brick Uspenski Cathedral overlooks a harbor.

SCIENCE: ‘THE BIGGEST BREAKTHROUGHS IN Math & Computer Science’ In 2020

For mathematicians and computer scientists, 2020 was full of discipline-spanning discoveries and celebrations of creativity. We’d like to take a moment to recognize some of these achievements.

  • 1. A landmark proof simply titled “MIP* = RE” establishes that quantum computers calculating with entangled qubits can theoretically verify the answers to an enormous set of problems. Along the way, the five computer scientists who authored the proof also answered two other major questions: Tsirelson’s problem in physics, about models of particle entanglement, and a problem in pure mathematics called the Connes embedding conjecture.
  • 2. In February, graduate student Lisa Piccirillo dusted off some long-known but little-utilized mathematical tools to answer a decades-old question about knots. A particular knot named after the legendary mathematician John Conway had long evaded mathematical classification in terms of a higher-dimensional property known as “sliceness.” But by developing a version of the knot that yielded to traditional knot analysis, Piccirillo finally determined that the Conway knot is not “slice.”
  • 3. For decades, mathematicians have used computer programs known as proof assistants to help them write proofs — but the humans have always guided the process, choosing the proof’s overall strategy and approach. That may soon change. Many mathematicians are excited about a proof assistant called Lean, an efficient and addictive proof assistant that could one day help tackle major problems. First, though, mathematicians must digitize thousands of years of mathematical knowledge, much of it unwritten, into a form Lean can process. Researchers have already encoded some of the most complicated mathematical ideas, proving in theory that the software can handle the hard stuff. Now it’s just a question of filling in the rest.