Tag Archives: The Louvre

Museum Tours: The Louvre Reopens To Visitors (Video)

Date of Video: May 19, 2021

The Louvre, or the Louvre Museum, is the world’s largest art museum and a historic monument in Paris, France, and is best known for being the home of the Mona Lisa. A central landmark of the city, it is located on the Right Bank of the Seine in the city’s 1st arrondissement.

Walks: ‘Tuileries Garden – Paris, France’ (4K Video)

The Tuileries Garden is a public garden located between the Louvre and the Place de la Concorde in the 1st arrondissement of Paris, France. Created by Catherine de’ Medici as the garden of the Tuileries Palace in 1564, it was eventually opened to the public in 1667 and became a public park after the French Revolution.

Top Walking Tours: ‘Paris – Hidden Gems & Landmarks’

Paris, France’s capital, is a major European city and a global center for art, fashion, gastronomy and culture. Its 19th-century cityscape is crisscrossed by wide boulevards and the River Seine. Beyond such landmarks as the Eiffel Tower and the 12th-century, Gothic Notre-Dame cathedral, the city is known for its cafe culture and designer boutiques along the Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré.

Video timeline: 00:00​ Introduction 00:35​ Shakespeare and Company Bookstore 01:25​ Wallace fountains 02:14​ Oldest bridge in the City 03:15​ Pont des Arts 04:00​ Notre Dame 05:27​ Louvre Museum 06:08​ Eiffel Tower 06:53​ Montmartre 07:40​ Wall of Love

Inside Views: The ‘Louvre Museum’ Masterpieces Undergo Renovation

After months of closure since the beginning of the health crisis and only a reopening for a few short months between two confinements last summer, the #Louvre​ lost 72% of attendance by 2020. But despite the absence of visitors, the heart of the #museum​ has not completely stopped beating. The Louvre is even taking advantage of this period to carry out #renovations​.

The Arts: ‘Louvre Museum’ In Paris Revives As Visitors Drop 72% In 2020 (Video)

After six months of cumulative closure since the beginning of the health crisis and only a reopening for a few short months between two confinements this summer, the #Louvre​ lost 72% of attendance by 2020. But despite the absence of visitors, the heart of the museum has not completely stopped beating. The Louvre is even taking advantage of this period to carry out #renovations​.

New Art Films: ‘MUSEUM’ – Ballet & Skateboarding At The Louvre And Musée d’Orsay In Paris (Video)

A love story between a ballet dancer and a Parisian skateboarder in empty French museums. The union of two bodies in motion through time and history of art. Two souls intimately linked, each one appropriating their own space to revive the works of art. Museum : an epic and lyrical journey between shadows and lights combining classical ballet and skateboarding.

Directed by Marin Troude & Tristan Helias
Produced by Tristan Helias
Ballet dancer : Victoria Dauberville
Skateboarder : Tristan Helias
Musée d’Orsay : Laurence Des Cars, Amélie Hardivillier, Marion Guillaud, Fanny Livet
CMN : Philippe Béleval, Jill Ickowicz
Script : Tristan Helias, Marin Troude
Art direction : Marin Troude, Tristan Helias
Ballet choreography : Victora Dauberville
Cinematography : Killian Lassablière & Marin Troude

New Books: “The Louvre – The Many Lives Of The World’s Most Famous Museum” (James Gardner)

The Louvre James GardnerThe fascinating and little-known story of the Louvre, from its inception as a humble fortress to its transformation into the palatial residence of the kings of France and then into the world’s greatest art museum.

Some ten million people from all over the world flock to the Louvre each year to enjoy its incomparable art collection. Yet few of them are aware of the remarkable history of that place and of the buildings themselves―a fascinating story that historian James Gardner elegantly chronicles in the first full-length history of the Louvre in English.

More than 7,000 years ago, men and women camped on a spot called le Louvre for reasons unknown; a clay quarry and a vineyard supported a society there in the first centuries AD. A thousand years later, King Philippe Auguste of France constructed a fortress there in 1191, just outside the walls of a city far smaller than the Paris we know today. Intended to protect the capital against English soldiers stationed in Normandy, the fortress became a royal residence under Charles V two centuries later, and then the monarchy’s principal residence under the great Renaissance king François I in 1546.

It remained so until 1682, when Louis XIV moved his entire court to Versailles. Thereafter the fortunes of the Louvre languished until the tumultuous days of the French Revolution when, during the Reign of Terror in 1793, it first opened its doors to display the nation’s treasures. Ever since―through the Napoleonic era, the Commune, two World Wars, to the present―the Louvre has been a witness to French history, and expanded to become home to a legendary collection, including such masterpieces as the Mona Lisa and Venus de Milo, whose often-complicated and mysterious origins form a spectacular narrative that rivals the building’s grand stature.

James Gardner

James Gardner is an American art critic and literary critic based in New York and Buenos Aires. He is the author of six books, including Buenos Aires: The Biography of a City. His writings have appeared in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the New Republic, and the British Spectator. He was the art critic at the New York Post and wrote architecture criticism for the New York Observer, before serving as the architecture critic at the New York Sun. He is now a contributing editor at The Magazine Antiques.

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