Tag Archives: NYC

Art History: “Cocktails With A Curator – Turner’s ‘Harbor Of Dieppe'” (Frick)

In this episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” Xavier F. Salomon, Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator, discusses the French port city depicted in J. M. W. Turner’s painting “Harbor of Dieppe: Changement de Domicile,” and how the artist’s extensive travel throughout Europe helped to develop his affinity for harbors. The complementary cocktail is the Widow’s Kiss, a French drink traditionally given to women who had lost their husbands at sea.

To see this painting in detail, please visit our website: https://collections.frick.org/objects…

 

Art: “Cocktails With A Curator – Rembrandt’s ‘Polish Rider’ ” (The Frick)

In this episode of “Cocktails with a Curator,” Xavier F. Salomon, Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator, hosts us again for happy hour at his apartment. The subject of tonight’s presentation is the mysterious “Polish Rider ” by Rembrandt, and the complementary cocktail is the Szarlotka, a Polish drink made with Żubrówka (vodka infused with bison grass).

Design: Inside The New York Home Of Legendary Architect I.M. Pei (Video)

When Ieoh Ming Pei, one of the most lauded architects of the past 50 years, was first asked to renovate The Louvre in Paris, his reaction was unequivocal: ‘You cannot touch the Louvre, it’s sacrilege.’

His solution was both revolutionary and simple — he built a glass pyramid in the centre of the forecourt that concealed a subterranean entrance way. Scorned at the time as a modernist intrusion on the 16th- and 17th-century building, the Pyramid is today celebrated as a statement of bold, high-tech futurism, and indicative of an architect who made his reputation by creating buildings at the intersection of art, history and culture.

Learn more about I.M. Pei

Style: A Look At NYC Home Of The Late Lee Radziwill – “Muse To Warhol And Capote” In 1960’s & 70’s

Fluent in French and Italian, Lee Bouvier Radziwill was able to navigate New York and European high society, and support her sister Jackie, who became the First At Home With Lee Radziwill Christies video April 5 2020Lady when her husband John F. Kennedy was elected President.

Fashion writer Hamish Bowles said Radziwill ‘defined dynamic American style for decades’. In fact it was Lee’s innate style that helped shape Jackie Kennedy’s wardrobe and transformed her into a fashion icon. Lee had a taste for the exotic and unexpected, and understood how clothes could be used to make a statement in the political arena.

She was one of Truman Capote’s ‘Swans’ — the beautiful socialites he doted on — and when he threw his spectacular Black and White masked ball at The Plaza in 1966, she was a guest of honor.

Lee was just as comfortable at the Factory, mingling with Gerard Malanga and Andy Warhol, or on the Rolling Stones’ tour bus with Mick Jagger and his wife Bianca, who holidayed with her in the Hamptons.

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Art: “Van Gogh In Paris, 1886” (Hammer Galleries)

TEFAF’s Meet the Experts presents Howard Shaw from Hammer Gallery shares what Van Gogh would have most likely seen when he visited Paris in 1886. This period of Van Gogh’s life is pivotal to his works as an artist.

Museum Tours: View “The Garden Court – Frick Collection” In 5K Video

Enjoy this 360° video view of the Garden Court of The Frick Collection. Available through your phone with Google Cardboard or other viewer as a 360° VR video. Right click or control + click (on a Mac) to select loop and enjoy the soothing sounds of the fountain. Shot during the exhibition, Canova’s George Washington, on view at The Frick Collection from May 23, 2018 to September 23, 2018.

Painters Of The 1920’s & 1930’s: “Moonlight Ballad – The Art Of Martin Lewis”

 

Born in Victoria, Australia, Martin Lewis was a printmaker who is known for his scenes of urban life in New York during the 1920s and 1930s. As a youth Lewis held a variety of jobs that ranged from working on cattle ranches in the Australian Outback, in logging and mining camps, to being a sailor. In 1898, he moved to Sydney for two years where he received his only formal art training. During this period he may have been introduced to printmaking; a local radical paper, The Bulletin, published two of his drawings.

Lewis left Australia in 1900 and first settled in San Francisco. He eventually worked his way eastward to New York. Little is known about his life during the following decade except that he made a living as a commercial artist and produced his first etching in 1915. Lewis’ skill as an etcher was noticed by Edward Hopper, who became a lifelong friend. In 1920, dissatisfied with his job, Lewis used his entire savings to study art and to sketch in Japan. He returned to New York after a two-year stay and resumed his commercial art career, but also pursued his own work as a painter and printmaker.

During the Depression, Lewis moved to Newtown, Connecticut, but later returned to Manhattan, where he helped establish a school for printmakers. From 1944-1952 Lewis taught a graphics course at the Art Students League in New York.

During his thirty-year career, Lewis made about 145 drypoints and etchings. His prints, like Shadow Dance and Stoops in Snow, were much admired during the 1930s for their realistic portrayal of daily life and sensitive rendering of texture. The artist’s skill in composition and his talent in the drypoint and etching media have received renewed attention in recent years. Lewis is one of the few printmakers of this era who specialized in nocturnal scenes. Some scholars consider his print Glow of the City his most significant work because of the subtlety of handling. A minute network of dots, lines, and flecks scratched onto the plate creates the illusion of transparent garments hanging in the foreground, while the Chanin Building, an art deco skyscraper, towers over the nearby tenements.

nga.gov/collection/artist-info.4704.html

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Lewis_(artist)

New Exhibitions: “The British Galleries” Reopens At The Metropolitan Museum Of Art (Mar 2020)

The British Galleries Metropolitan Museum of Art Reopens March 2020The British Galleries are reopening with almost 700 works of art on view, including a large number of new acquisitions, particularly works from the 19th century that were purchased with this project in mind. This is the first complete renovation of the galleries since they were established (Josephine Mercy Heathcote Gallery in 1986, Annie Laurie Aitken Galleries in 1989). A prominent new entrance provides direct access from the galleries for medieval European art, creating a seamless transition from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance.

The British Galleries Metropolitan Museum of Art Reopens March 2020A highlight of The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s 150th anniversary in 2020 is the opening, on March 2, of the Museum’s newly installed Annie Laurie Aitken Galleries and Josephine Mercy Heathcote Gallery—11,000 square feet devoted to British decorative arts, design, and sculpture created between 1500 and 1900. The reimagined suite of 10 galleries (including three superb 18th-century interiors) provides a fresh perspective on the period, focusing on its bold, entrepreneurial spirit and complex history. The new narrative offers a chronological exploration of the intense commercial drive among artists, manufacturers, and retailers that shaped British design over the course of 400 years. During this period, global trade and the growth of the British Empire fueled innovation, industry, and exploitation. Works on view illuminate the emergence of a new middle class—ready consumers for luxury goods—which inspired an age of exceptional creativity and invention during a time of harsh colonialism.

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Exhibitions: “Countryside, The Future” Through The Lens Of Architect Rem Koolhaas (Guggenheim)

Countryside, The Future is an exhibition addressing urgent environmental, political, and socioeconomic issues through the lens of architect and urbanist Rem Koolhaas and Samir Bantal, Director of AMO, the think tank of the Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA).

A unique exhibition for the Guggenheim Museum, Countryside, The Future will explore radical changes in the rural, remote, and wild territories collectively identified here as “countryside,” or the 98% of the Earth’s surface not occupied by cities, with a full rotunda installation premised on original research. The project presents investigations Rem Koolhaas Architectby AMO, Koolhaas, with students at the Harvard Graduate School of Design; the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing; Wageningen University, Netherlands; and the University of Nairobi. The exhibition will examine the modern conception of leisure, large-scale planning by political forces, climate change, migration, human and nonhuman ecosystems, market-driven preservation, artificial and organic coexistence, and other forms of radical experimentation that are altering landscapes across the world.

Rem Koolhaas (Rotterdam, 1944) founded OMA in 1975 together with Elia and Zoe Zenghelis and Madelon Vriesendorp. He graduated from the Architectural Association in London and in 1978 published Delirious New York: A Retroactive Manifesto for Manhattan. In 1995, his book S,M,L,XL summarized the work of OMA in “a novel about architecture”. He co-heads the work of both OMA and AMO, the research branch of OMA, operating in areas beyond the realm of architecture. His built work includes the Qatar National Library and the Qatar Foundation Headquarters (2018), Fondation Galeries Lafayette in Paris (2018), Fondazione Prada in Milan (2015/2018), Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow (2015), the headquarters for China Central Television (CCTV) in Beijing (2012), Casa da Musica in Porto (2005), Seattle Central Library (2004), and the Netherlands Embassy in Berlin (2003). Current projects include the Taipei Performing Arts Centre, a new building for Axel Springer in Berlin, and the Factory in Manchester. Koolhaas directed the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale, is a professor at Harvard University, and is preparing a major exhibition for the Guggenheim museum to open in 2019 entitled Countryside: Future of the World.

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New Champagne Bars: “The Riddler” In New York City

The Riddler Champagne Bar Outside New York CityA restaurant funded solely by female investors, The Riddler is a New York City champagne bar from owner Jen Pelka.

The Riddler is a Champagne bar with locations in the heart of New York’s West Village and San Francisco’s Hayes Valley. We have over 150 Champagnes by the bottle and dozens of sparkling wines by the glass to choose from: old and new, traditional classics and unusual discoveries, by the glass and by the bottle (or magnum or 9L). At the center of each space is an old wooden backbar that we’ve lined with a collection of vintage Champagne buckets and glassware that we’ve picked up at flea markets and estate sales over the last decade.

We’re a women-led team: 100% of our investors are women and most of our management team happens to be led by a crew of women. We love serious wines but don’t take ourselves too seriously: we pair our Champagne with French-inspired seasonal comforts, serve our caviar with potato chips, and offer free popcorn all day and all night.

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