Coronavirus / Covid -19: “What Happens When It Enters Your Body” (Video)

The Telegraph LogoWhat happens when you catch coronavirus? The Telegraph’s Global Health Security Editor Paul Nuki explains all the ways in which you could become infected with COVID-19 and how your body reacts to this virus.

What happens when the virus enters the body?

When the virus enters your body it binds to two cells in the lungs – goblet cells that produce mucus and cilia cells which have hairs on them and normally prevent your lungs filling up with debris and fluid such as virus and bacteria and particles of dust and pollen.

The virus attacks these cells and starts to kill them – so your lungs begin to fill with fluid making it hard for you to breathe. This phase of the disease is thought to last about a week.

At this point your immune system will start to kick in and fight off the invaders. You will develop a fever and your high body temperature will create a hostile environment for the virus. You will start to get rid of the mucus in the form of coughing and a runny nose.

But in some people – particularly the elderly and those with other health conditions – the immune system can go into overdrive. As well as killing the virus it also starts to kill healthy cells.

This heightened immune response can trigger a “cytokine storm” – white blood cells activate a variety of chemicals that can leak into the lungs, which along with the attack on the cells damages them even further. Scans of the lungs show “ground-glass” opacity and then “crazy paving” patterns, as they fill with mucus making it harder and harder to breathe.

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New Science Podcasts: Faster Image ID, Crafting Crystals And Coronavirus / Covid-19 Update (Nature)

Nature PodcastsListen to the latest from the world of science, with Benjamin Thompson and Nick Howe. This week, improving computers’ image identification, and a new method for growing crystals.

In this episode:

00:44 Upgrading computer sight

Researchers have designed a sensor that allows machines to assess images in nanoseconds. Research Article: Mennel et al.News and Views: In-sensor computing for machine vision

06:51 Research Highlights

Calorie restriction’s effects on rat cells, and the dwindling of sandy seashores. Research Highlight: Old age’s hallmarks are delayed in dieting ratsResearch Highlight: Sandy beaches are endangered worldwide as the climate changes

08:53 Crafting crystals

To understand the structure of materials, researchers often have to grow them in crystal form. A new method aims to speed up this process. Research article: Sun et al.

14:48 News Chat

Coronavirus outbreak updates, and climate change’s role in the Australian bush fires. News: Coronavirus: latest news on spreading infectionNews: Climate change made Australia’s ‘unprecedented’ bushfires 30% more likely

Health: All Adults 18-79 Should Be Screened For Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)

From a Stanford University online article (March 2, 2020):

Health Policy Stanford“The opioid epidemic has added fuel to the HCV fire, substantially increasing transmission,” said Owens. “HCV is now an enormous public health problem, affecting a much broader age range of people than before. Fortunately, we have the tools to identify people and treatment is now successful in the vast majority of patients, so screening can prevent the mortality and morbidity from HCV.”

A task force of national health experts recommends clinicians screen all adults 18 to 79 for the hepatitis C virus (HCV), noting that the viral infection is now associated with more deaths in the United States than the top 60 reportable infectious diseases combined. Many people are unaware they are carrying the viral infection.

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“People with hepatitis C do not always feel sick and may not know they have it,” says chair of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Douglas K. Owens, M.D, M.S. “Screening is key to finding this infection early, when it’s easier to treat and cure, helping reduce illnesses and deaths.”

Owens, who is the director of Stanford Health Policy and the Henry J. Kaiser, Jr., Professor of Medicine, said the opioid epidemic now plays an important role in the prevalence of HCV. There are more than three times the number of acute HCV cases than a decade ago, particularly among young, white, injection drug users who live in rural areas. Women aged 15 to 44 have also been hit hard by the virus that is spread through contaminated blood.

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Art History Podcasts: “Understanding the Medieval World through Books” (Getty Museum)

Getty Museum PodcastsWhat was the world like from 500 to 1500 CE? This period, often called medieval or the Middle Ages in European history, saw the rise and fall of empires and the expansion of cross-cultural exchange.

Getty curator Bryan C. Keene argues that illuminated manuscripts and decorated texts from Africa, Asia, Australasia, the Americas, and Europe are windows through which we can view the interconnected history of humanity. In this episode, he discusses his recent book Toward a Global Middle Ages: Encountering the World through Illuminated Manuscripts, highlighting the challenges and opportunities of the emerging discipline known as the Global Middle Ages.

Politics: Biden And Sanders Emerge As Favorites On “Super Tuesday” (BBC News)

 

Super Tuesday provided contrasting fortunes for the Democratic candidates hoping to take on Donald Trump. BBC reporters were on the ground with the three leading campaigns as the results came in (but with no decision yet in the all-important Texas and California contests). Here are their verdicts on where Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden and Michael Bloomberg stand now.