Tag Archives: Screenings

Health Talk: “Colorectal Cancer” & Importance Of Screening (Mayo Clinic)

 

On the Mayo Clinic Radio program, Dr. John Kisiel, a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist, discusses colorectal cancer and the importance of recommended screening tests.

This interview originally aired March 7, 2020. Disclaimer: Mayo Clinic has a financial interest in Exact Sciences.

Among cancers that affect men and women, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Most cases of colorectal cancer begin as small, noncancerous (benign) clumps of cells called polyps. Over time, some polyps become colon cancer. Because these polyps may be small and produce few, if any, symptoms, health care providers recommend regular screening tests to prevent colon cancer. These screenings identify and remove polyps before they become cancerous. March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness month, a time to educate the public about the importance of colorectal cancer screening.

Health: All Adults 18-79 Should Be Screened For Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)

From a Stanford University online article (March 2, 2020):

Health Policy Stanford“The opioid epidemic has added fuel to the HCV fire, substantially increasing transmission,” said Owens. “HCV is now an enormous public health problem, affecting a much broader age range of people than before. Fortunately, we have the tools to identify people and treatment is now successful in the vast majority of patients, so screening can prevent the mortality and morbidity from HCV.”

A task force of national health experts recommends clinicians screen all adults 18 to 79 for the hepatitis C virus (HCV), noting that the viral infection is now associated with more deaths in the United States than the top 60 reportable infectious diseases combined. Many people are unaware they are carrying the viral infection.

CDC-viral-hepatitis-work-P-page-0

“People with hepatitis C do not always feel sick and may not know they have it,” says chair of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Douglas K. Owens, M.D, M.S. “Screening is key to finding this infection early, when it’s easier to treat and cure, helping reduce illnesses and deaths.”

Owens, who is the director of Stanford Health Policy and the Henry J. Kaiser, Jr., Professor of Medicine, said the opioid epidemic now plays an important role in the prevalence of HCV. There are more than three times the number of acute HCV cases than a decade ago, particularly among young, white, injection drug users who live in rural areas. Women aged 15 to 44 have also been hit hard by the virus that is spread through contaminated blood.

Read full Article

Elder-Care Crisis: Early Screening For Dementia, Increased Preventative Primary-Care Are Needed

From a Wall Street Journal Opinion article (Feb 10, 2020):

How to address the elder-care crisis? Ideally, doctors would screen older patients for dementia. An early diagnosis helps patients understand treatment options, plan for the future and receive appropriate care in the hospital. 

Costs of Long-Term Elderly Care Kaiser Infographic

Other steps include: more preventive care, changes to Medicare’s rehabilitation policies, adopting new reimbursement methods, and developing new measures of success. Primary-care offices can prevent hospital visits, but Americans seeking primary care face an average wait time of 24 days. This might not be a problem for a patient in need of an annual physical, but conditions like chest pain or infections require prompt treatment. Primary-care offices that offer same-day sick visits, home visits for bed-bound older adults, or at-home monitoring of conditions could reduce emergency department volumes.

Read full article by Elizabeth Goldberg MD

Top Medical Podcasts: Lung-Cancer Screenings, Placebo Effects (NEJM)

Lung-Cancer Mortality with Volume CT Screening NEJM February 2020Featuring articles on lung-cancer screening in the NELSON trial, ribociclib and fulvestrant in metastatic breast cancer, vitamin D in pregnancy and asthma, treatment thresholds for neonatal hypoglycemia, and CAR-NK cells in anti-CD19 lymphoid tumors; a review article on placebo and nocebo effects; a Clinical Problem-Solving describing a rapid change in pressure; and Perspective articles on altruism in Extremis, on abuses of FDA regulatory procedures, and on joining forces against delirium.

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