Tag Archives: Travel & History

History Of Berlin: The Brandenburg Gate (1790)

The Brandenburg Gate is an 18th-century neoclassical monument in Berlin, built on the orders of Prussian king Frederick William II after the temporary restoration of order during the Batavian Revolution.

Ancient Egypt: Ramses II & The Hittite Peace Treaty

While Ramses II is often hailed for his military achievements and his skill as a warrior, he was also a well versed diplomat. During his reign he brought the 20 year war with the Hittites to an end and created one of the first written peace treaties.

Architectural Tour: The Pena Palace In Portugal

In 1836, Queen Maria, The Second, of Portugal married a German prince named Ferdinand. As a love letter to his new wife and Portuguese subjects, the King of Portugal built something that would embrace and celebrate Portugal’s cultural DNA – the Pena Palace. From above, one can see the incredibly nuanced construction of the castle’s domes to reflect Portugal’s rich history and the neo-Gothic, neo-Manueline, neo-Islamic and neo-Indian architectural influences. King Ferdinand’s attention to detail charmed his people and the Royal Family, who soon made the Pena Palace their summer residence, which would remain the case for the next six decades.

History: The Legendary ‘American Colony Hotel’ – Jerusalem (DW Video)

The elegant “American Colony Hotel” in Jerusalem is an island of tranquility in a troubled city. The grand hotel has lived through all of Jerusalem’s serious crises. Everyone is welcome here, no matter where they come from or what they believe. The name “American Colony Hotel” goes back to a group of 19th Century American pilgrims. In its early days, the grand hotel was located among olive groves outside Jerusalem’s city walls. For over a hundred years, many parties to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict have shaken hands, eaten and drunk here together. People mingle here in a way they would never do elsewhere. Behind it all is the fascinating story of Anna and Horatio Spafford, who, after several tragic events, moved from the US to the Holy Land with a community of devout Christians. With diligence, skill, and an insistence on neutrality and tolerance despite political difficulties, they created a hotel in a truly special location. Its atmosphere continues to attract illustrious guests from the worlds of politics, diplomacy, literature, art and entertainment.

Europe: ‘An Economic History Of Spain’ (Video)

The Spanish economy is one of extremes. At one point a focus of the eurozone crisis, at another the largest contributor of growth, and more recently, suffering the greatest economic hit of any Advanced Economy in 2020. Spain’s economic problems are often confused. In the years leading up to the Great Recession it posted consistent budget surpluses. However, a huge real estate bubble was lying in wait. The question… is why? Why did Spain go from a seemingly safe level of debt to one larger than it’s economy? How was the housing bubble encouraged? And since then, has Spain’s economy ever truly recovered? Or in what ways?

Travel & History: North Korea Capital ‘Pyongyang’

Pyongyang is the capital and largest city of North Korea. Pyongyang is located on the Taedong River about 109 kilometers upstream from its mouth on the Yellow Sea. According to the 2008 population census, it has a population of 3,255,288.

Historic Villages: ‘Barnes – Richmond Upon Thames’ In Southwest London, UK

Barnes played a role in everything from the invention of football to the execution of Mary, Queen of Scots. Carla Passino takes a closer look.

Toby Keel – January 6, 2021

Until an army of 19th-century engineers descended on Barnes to build bridges and railways, this was a world apart, a rural idyll preserved intact by the Thames that bounds it on three sides.

Mentioned in the Domesday Book, the village had made history even earlier, when it was granted by King Æthelstan to the canons of St Paul in the 900s. The link between Barnes and St Paul’s persists more than 1,000 years on, as the Dean and Chapter owns one of the local gems: 122-acre Barnes Common.

Today, its woodland and acid grass-land are an oasis for hedgehogs, bats, butterflies and Nature-starved Londoners, but, for many centuries, they were home to grazing cattle. The livestock even became embroiled in a dispute between Barnes and neighbouring Putney in 1589, when ‘the men of Barnes refused to allow the men of Putney to use the Common and impounded their cattle,’ reports A History of the County of Surrey.

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Landmarks & History: ‘The Pantheon – Rome’ (Video)

“Anyone who steps inside the Pantheon immediately feels the crushing weight of human history, but also the incredible lightness of human creativity,”

If Rome is the Eternal City, the Pantheon is its eternal building, still in use after 2,000 years and attracting six million visitors a year.

The Pantheon is a former Roman temple, now a Catholic church, in Rome, Italy, on the site of an earlier temple commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augustus. It was rebuilt by the emperor Hadrian and probably dedicated about 126 AD.

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