Tag Archives: Archaeology

Mexico Archaeology: Lost Sak Tz’i’ Dynasty Unveiled

National Geographic UK – Modern technology has enabled archaeologists to virtually peel back a forest to discover the lost Maya city, an ancient civilisation that existed for up to 3,000 years and stretched from the pacific coast to the gulf coast of Mexico.

The technology, known as LIDAR, shot lasers from a plane through the tree canopy which bounced off of the ground to create an image of the earth below. The images were then used to map and uncover the hidden historical structures that make up the ancient Maya city.

According to a report in The New York Times, a fortified Maya settlement thought to be the capital of the Sak Tz’i’ dynasty is being investigated on private land in southern Mexico by a team of researchers including Charles Golden of Brandeis University. The site is thought to have been occupied as early as 750 B.C. until the end of the Classic period, around A.D. 900.

Golden said that the ruins cover about 100 acres and include an acropolis dominated by a 45-foot-tall pyramid, temples, plazas, reception halls, a palace, ceremonial centers, and a ball court measuring about 350 feet long by 16 feet wide. Inscriptions from other sites had linked the kingdom of Sak Tz’i’ to the Maya cities of Piedras Negras, Bonampak, Palenque, Tonina, and Yaxchilan.

Archaeology: The Hathor Temple In Dendera, Egypt

National Geographic UK – Egypt’s Largest Temple To Hathor: National Geographic UK Dendera is a holy site that dates back to Egypt’s old kingdom, more than 2,000 years before Cleopatra. For over two millennia 1,000’s of worshippers would gather here each year to celebrate a festival in honour of Hathor the Goddess of Earth and Motherhood. Full of beautiful buildings from all different periods, this ancient archaeological treasure is like a history book of Egypt.

However, one structure dominates the site, a vast stone temple, 140 feet wide with an entrance hall boasting 24 gargantuan columns. Venture into this remarkable temple and discover the ancient hieroglyphics that cover every inch of its surface in brand new episodes of Lost Treasures of Egypt, Sundays at 8pm, on National Geographic UK.

Archaeology: Neolithic Village Of Ba’ja In Jordan

DW Documentary – The Neolithic village of Ba’ja in Jordan

is a famous archaeological site. It was one of the world’s first known settlements, founded some 9,000 years ago. The site has produced magnificent finds including an ancient necklace made of 2,500 beads. What prompted our Neolithic ancestors to settle down? Why did they change their nomadic, hunter-gatherer lives so radically?

As is so often the case in archaeology, it is tombs that tell us the most, while also raising new questions. One of the most magnificent finds at the Ba’ja archaeological site is the richly furnished tomb of a young girl. In 2018, as the excavation team was about to depart, beads emerged from beneath the slab of a nondescript tomb. The team kept working until they finally recovered around 2,500 beads.

Further research showed the beads belonged to an elaborately crafted necklace that had been buried with the girl. The team affectionately christened her Jamila, “the beautiful one.” Jamila’s necklace is a sensation, and has been put on display at the new Petra Museum. There, the entire history of the country is presented, beginning with Ba’ja and humankind’s decision to leave behind the hunter-gatherer lifestyle.

Along with other finds from Ba’ja, Jamila’s finely wrought necklace calls into question much of what we thought we knew about the Stone Age. In recent decades, the burial site in Jordan has helped us see Neolithic people through different eyes. One thing seems clear: They were able to invest time in aesthetics, jewelry and furnishings because their food supply was secure.

Previews: Archaeology Magazine – Nov/Dec 2022

Priestess, Poet, Politician

4,000 years ago, the world’s first author composed verses that helped forge the Akkadian Empire

Mexico’s Butterfly Warriors

The annual monarch migration may have been a sacred event for the people of Mesoamerica

A Tale of Two Abbeys

How entrepreneurial monks shaped the landscape of medieval England

Bronze Age Urban Experiment

Archaeologists debate who ruled the cities of the ancient Indus Valley

Magical Mystery Door

An investigation of an Egyptian sacred portal reveals a history of renovation and deception

Cover Previews: World Archaeology – Sept 2022

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The World Archaeology October 2022 issue explores the secrets of Japan’s stone circles, the lost prehistoric cities of Bolivia, women’s everyday lives in the Ice Age, an idyllic alpine region that saw fierce fighting during the First World War, and much more.

The stone circles of Japan are enigmatic monuments. These structures were created by Jomon hunter-gatherers, mostly from roughly 2500-300 BC, and can be associated with burials, seasonal ceremonies, and solar alignments. Such preoccupations are far from being restricted to Jomon Japan, with study of these circles proving influential when it came to early 20th-century attempts to understand Stonehenge. In our cover feature, we take a detailed look at some of the Jomon stone circles, examining both the monuments themselves, and wider activity in the period.

Cover Previews: World Archaeology – Aug 2022

Below the Yucatán Peninsula in Mexico lies a submerged world of extraordinary beauty. Caves once created a subterranean labyrinth that the earliest human settlers seemingly associated with magic. After these passageways flooded at the end of the last Ice Age, they created reservoirs that proved essential for the success of Maya cities. Now a fascinating project is revealing the remarkable range of archaeology preserved in this underworld.

Goddesses and spiritual beings also display an impressive range, in this case of powers. There can be a tendency for modern audiences to focus on a single attribute – Venus as the goddess of love, for instance – but this obscures the remarkable breadth of gifts they could bestow on worshippers. An exhibition examining the nature of feminine power provides an opportunity to consider the divine and the demonised.

Read more

Cover Preview: Current Archaeology – July 2022

This year, events are taking place across the country to celebrate the 1,900th anniversary of the construction of Hadrian’s Wall (the eagle-eyed among you may have spotted that this most-famous Roman landmark has also featured, in some capacity, in every issue of CA since January).

This month our cover story considers whether the Romans too may have commemorated the Wall’s construction – and we also have an opinion piece asking how sure we can be about its date.

From monumental stonework to modern quarrying, we next head to Bedfordshire to learn about archaeological investigations at Black Cat Quarry, carried out before extraction works began on the site. There, excavations have revealed an impressive multi-period landscape, including Neolithic and Bronze Age settlements, a significant Roman farmstead, and what may be the remains of a Viking ‘fort’ referred to in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.

Cover Preview: Science Magazine – June 3, 2022

Science Magazine – June 3, 2022: A 10th-century Maya structure at Chichen Itza, Mexico, is often called the Observatory for its expansive view of the sky and a design seemingly guided by key positions of the Sun, Moon, and planets. The historic Maya anchored their calendars and rituals to celestial events, and their astronomical knowledge is now coming into sharper focus thanks to new analyses of archaeological relics and insights from today’s Maya.

Previews: Archaeology Magazine – May/June 2022

Table of Contents  May/June 2022

Secrets of Scotland’s Viking Age Hoard

A massive cache of Viking silver and Anglo-Saxon heirlooms reveals the complex political landscape of ninth-century Britain

The World of Egyptian Demons

Thousands of supernatural beings, including protective cobra spirits and knife-wielding turtles, guarded ancient Egyptians in life and death

Fit for Fighting

The discovery of Mesopotamian-style armor in northwest China offers new insights into a battle- tested ancient technology

To Live and Die in Pompeii

Unearthing the unusual burial of a freedman who gained entrée into the city’s top social ranks

Walking Tour: Roman Ruins At Pompeii, Italy (4K)

The archaeological ruins of Pompeii, Campania, Italy walking tour in 4k. January 2, 2022.

Pompeii is a vast archaeological site in southern Italy’s Campania region, near the coast of the Bay of Naples. Once a thriving and sophisticated Roman city, Pompeii was buried under meters of ash and pumice after the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D. The preserved site features excavated ruins of streets and houses that visitors can freely explore

Video timeline: 00:00 Preview 01:27 Piazza Anfiteatro (Entrance) 04:00 Anfiteatro / Amphitheater 11:00 Praedia di Giulia Felice 14:00 Via dell’Abbondanza 16:25 Casa di Octavius Quartio 20:50 Via di Castricio 23:10 Via dell’Abbondanza 24:00 Taverna di Sotericus 25:36 Casa di Trebio Valente 27:25 Casa del Frutteto 29:00 Casa di Giulio Polibio 29:45 Casa e Thermopolium di Vetutius Placidus 33:20 Thermopolium di Asellina 34:30 Casa degli Epidii 39:36 Panoramic view of Pompeii 43:30 Via dell’Abbondanza 45:25 Via Stabiana 46:35 Casa del Citarista 50:00 Porta di Stabia (Gate of Stabia) 52:20 Teatro Piccolo (Small Theater) Odeion 53:03 Quadriportico dei Teatro o Caserma dei Gladiatori (Quadriportico of the Theater or Barracks of the Gladiators) 54:30 Teatro Grande 1:04:05 Terme Stabiane (Stabian Baths) 1:11:50 Forum 1:24:50 Granaries of the Forum (Casts) 1:28:30 The garden of the fugitives (Casts) 1:30:00 Necropoli di P. Nocera