Category Archives: Archaeology

Cover Preview: Current Archaeology – July 2022

This year, events are taking place across the country to celebrate the 1,900th anniversary of the construction of Hadrian’s Wall (the eagle-eyed among you may have spotted that this most-famous Roman landmark has also featured, in some capacity, in every issue of CA since January).

This month our cover story considers whether the Romans too may have commemorated the Wall’s construction – and we also have an opinion piece asking how sure we can be about its date.

From monumental stonework to modern quarrying, we next head to Bedfordshire to learn about archaeological investigations at Black Cat Quarry, carried out before extraction works began on the site. There, excavations have revealed an impressive multi-period landscape, including Neolithic and Bronze Age settlements, a significant Roman farmstead, and what may be the remains of a Viking ‘fort’ referred to in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.

Louvre Exhibits: ‘Pharaoh Of The Two Lands, African Kings of Napata’ In Paris

PHARAOH OF THE TWO LANDS – The African Story of the Kings of Napata

28 April – 25 July 2022

OVERVIEW

In the 8th century BC, a kingdom grew up around the Nubian capital, Napata. In about 730 BC, the Nubian king Piankhy conquered Egypt and founded the 25th Dynasty of Kushite kings, who ruled for more than fifty years over a kingdom stretching from the Nile Delta to the confluence of the White and Blue Niles. The most famous of those kings is the pharaoh Taharqa.

The exhibition highlights the importance of this vast kingdom, located in what is now northern Sudan. It is organised in connection with the Louvre’s archaeological campaign in Sudan, which focused for ten years on the site of Muweis before moving some 30 kilometres northwards to El-Hassa, not far from the pyramids of Meroe.

Egypt Walks: Pyramids & Great Sphinx Of Giza (4K)

This walking tour of the Giza Pyramid Complex was filmed on Friday April 1st, 2022 starting at 1:23 at the Great Sphinx. After visiting the Sphinx, you will walk up the causeway to the Pyramid of Khafre and walk around all four sides. Next we will walk through the Western Cemetery over the Great Pyramid, the Pyramid of Khufu. After exploring the Eastern Cemetery, we will take a horse carriage ride to the Pyramid of Menkaure.

Timeline: 0:00 Intro and Map 8:36 Great Sphinx 17:40 Khafre Causeway 28:19 Khafre Mortuary Temple 32:28 Pyramid of Khafre 41:01 Back side of Khafre Pyramid 47:26 Hieroglyphs and Tomb 56:20 Western Cemetery 1:03:30 Pyramid of Khufu 1:06:40 Climbing the Great Pyramid 1:13:08 Boat Pits 1:24:54 Khufu Mortuary Temple 1:28:07 Mastaba of Qar (G 7101) 1:29:57 Pyramids of the Queens 1:33:30 Eastern Cemetery 1:47:28 Horse Ride to Pyramid of Menkaure 1:56:16 Pyramid of Menkaure 2:01:35 Mortuary Temple of Menkaure 2:11:00 Pyramid Viewpoint 2:15:40 Pyramids of the Queens 2:21:54 Pyramid of Khafre 2:27:03 Khafre Causeway 2:37:12 Wall of the Crow 2:38:07 Streets outside the Pyramids

Previews: Archaeology Magazine – May/June 2022

Table of Contents  May/June 2022

Secrets of Scotland’s Viking Age Hoard

A massive cache of Viking silver and Anglo-Saxon heirlooms reveals the complex political landscape of ninth-century Britain

The World of Egyptian Demons

Thousands of supernatural beings, including protective cobra spirits and knife-wielding turtles, guarded ancient Egyptians in life and death

Fit for Fighting

The discovery of Mesopotamian-style armor in northwest China offers new insights into a battle- tested ancient technology

To Live and Die in Pompeii

Unearthing the unusual burial of a freedman who gained entrée into the city’s top social ranks

Walking Tour: Roman Ruins At Pompeii, Italy (4K)

The archaeological ruins of Pompeii, Campania, Italy walking tour in 4k. January 2, 2022.

Pompeii is a vast archaeological site in southern Italy’s Campania region, near the coast of the Bay of Naples. Once a thriving and sophisticated Roman city, Pompeii was buried under meters of ash and pumice after the catastrophic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D. The preserved site features excavated ruins of streets and houses that visitors can freely explore

Video timeline: 00:00 Preview 01:27 Piazza Anfiteatro (Entrance) 04:00 Anfiteatro / Amphitheater 11:00 Praedia di Giulia Felice 14:00 Via dell’Abbondanza 16:25 Casa di Octavius Quartio 20:50 Via di Castricio 23:10 Via dell’Abbondanza 24:00 Taverna di Sotericus 25:36 Casa di Trebio Valente 27:25 Casa del Frutteto 29:00 Casa di Giulio Polibio 29:45 Casa e Thermopolium di Vetutius Placidus 33:20 Thermopolium di Asellina 34:30 Casa degli Epidii 39:36 Panoramic view of Pompeii 43:30 Via dell’Abbondanza 45:25 Via Stabiana 46:35 Casa del Citarista 50:00 Porta di Stabia (Gate of Stabia) 52:20 Teatro Piccolo (Small Theater) Odeion 53:03 Quadriportico dei Teatro o Caserma dei Gladiatori (Quadriportico of the Theater or Barracks of the Gladiators) 54:30 Teatro Grande 1:04:05 Terme Stabiane (Stabian Baths) 1:11:50 Forum 1:24:50 Granaries of the Forum (Casts) 1:28:30 The garden of the fugitives (Casts) 1:30:00 Necropoli di P. Nocera

Egyptian History: Saving The Temples On The Nile

A timeless treasure, nearly lost forever. Without the UNESCO‘s unprecedented rescue operation, future generations might have only seen the stunning temples of Ramses II and Cleopatra in the pages of history books. Majestic stone colossi rising from the desert sands, structures like these kept their secrets for generations.

For centuries, Abu Simbel, Dendur, Amada and other monuments faced threats from looters, earthquakes, and floods. Ultimately, it was the waters of the Aswan Dam that nearly sealed their fate. In 1960, then Egyptian President Nasser ordered the dam‘s construction. In order to save the temples of Ramses II and Cleopatra, among others, UNESCO reached out to over 50 countries, and raised $80 million.

After receiving multiple proposals to save the structure, it was one from Sweden that proved successful. The plan: dismantling the complex and rebuilding it on higher ground. Between November 1963 and September 1968, saws were used to cut the two temples into 1,036 blocks, each weighing between seven and 30 tons.

Their new location was 64 meters above the old site and 180 meters further inland. After five years of construction, this major undertaking was completed on September 22, 1968. The Nubian temples of Abu Simbel are now a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Egyptology: Engineering Secrets Of King Khufu’s Great Pyramid Of Giza

The Great Pyramid of Giza is the largest pyramid ever built and is a staple of Egyptian pyramid architecture. It was built to protect the tomb of King Khufu and was the first-ever true pyramid, due to its perfect shape and extraordinary features.

The entrance of the tomb is located 24 feet off centre and even if trespassers found it, a pulley system of ropes 130 feet above the passage dropped 3 enormous granite slabs to seal the burial chamber entrance. Topped with a layer of white limestone, The Great Pyramid was and is a symbol of the Pharaoh’s reputation and respect. Now, explorers are eagerly searching the pyramid for clues about the life and death of the great King Khufu.

Archaeology: The Lost City Of Chan Chan In Peru

Dr. Albert Lin is investigating the true origin of the ancient story of the great flood. In his search for answers he comes to the lost city of Chan Chan where the Chimú people have recorded a violent shift in the ocean currents.

Chan Chan was the largest city of the pre-Columbian era in South America.[1] It is now an archaeological site in La Libertad Region 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) west of Trujillo, Peru.[2]

Chan Chan is located in the mouth of the Moche Valley[3] and was the capital of the historical empire of the Chimor from 900 to 1470,[4] when they were defeated and incorporated into the Inca Empire.[5] Chimor, a conquest state,[3] developed from the Chimú culture which established itself along the Peruvian coast around 900 AD.[6]

Chan Chan is in a particularly arid section of the coastal desert of northern Peru.[7] Due to the lack of rain in this area, the major source of nonsalted water for Chan Chan is in the form of rivers carrying surface runoff from the Andes.[4] This runoff allows for control of land and water through irrigation systems.

Archaeology: Lost Cities Of The Nabateans, Jordan (National Geographic)

Dr. Albert Lin is exploring the ancient architecture of the Nabateans, and recreates one of their lost cities using lidar.

The Nabataeans, also Nabateans, were an ancient Arab people who inhabited northern Arabia and the southern Levant. Their settlements—most prominently the assumed capital city of Raqmu —gave the name Nabatene to the Arabian borderland that stretched from the Euphrates to the Red Sea.