Tag Archives: Sydney

Architecture Tour: Emily House In Sydney, Australia

Working together, Aldini and Isaac Group have turned an abandoned warehouse into a modern dream home. Sitting on a small plot of land, the warehouse was in dire need of a contemporary lift – therefore the employment of organic shapes, elements and materials became the key focus for both interior designer and builder.

Video timeline: 00:00 – Introduction to the Modern Dream Home 00:25 – The Location of Emily House 00:38 – A Walkthrough of the Modern Dream Home 01:10 – Maximising the Previous Small Space 01:29 – The Builder 01:51 – Relationships and Working as a Team 02:14 – Utilising Natural Elements and Organic Shapes 03:10 – Elements of Softness and Curves 03:34 – Harnessing the Natural Light 04:02 – Favourite Parts of the Modern Dream Home 04:29 – Proud Moments

With a brief that only required the cathedral ceilings to be kept, the interior architecture was imbued with soft curves, natural shapes and materials, and a flood of natural light. In the end, the client’s home was turned into a modern dream home that would become a hub for connection, light and simple opulence.

Located in the inner west of Sydney, Emily House strikes an unassuming appearance with dark tones, leafy greens and a timber batten façade that hints at what is inside the modern dream home. Following the house tour inside, the front of the home contains the master bedroom and ensuite before offering a glimpse of the opulent kitchen – which is designed to be the hub for connection.

While using marble, granite and terrazzo throughout the modern dream home to add an opulence, the elements of curved bamboo, which is seen in the bathrooms and on the kitchen island bench, is used to soften the hardness of these materials. In the downstairs spaces, large steel windows, bi-fold doors and skylights have been installed to help bring more natural light inside while also adding to the sense of space inside.

Following the kitchen’s marble bench top and dark palette cabinetry, the dining and living room reference the same colours through the furnishings and marble that has been employed on the shelving and fireplace. To combat the hard lines of the steel and marble, the softening of elements has been encouraged throughout the interior design, which is seen in the soft curving of the Venetian plaster wall above the fireplace.

After the doors are opened, the courtyard helps to expand upon the liveable space and, with its terrazzo floor, curved seating arrangement and green wall the space, the downstairs living areas extend upon the client’s wish of creating a hub for connection. Upstairs, the inclusion of two more bedrooms and a bathroom further employs the use of stone, light and a natural colour palette.

Infused with natural light, the bedrooms offer guests an opulent stay that is reminiscent of five star hotels. Working together, the interior designer and builder established the modern dream home to become a space where the client could entertain. Additionally, the house is filled with a sense of softness – to which the client can find reprieve in the moments when it is needed.

Home & Kitchen Design: Queens Park, Sydney

Designing a modern house for a young family, Pohio Adams Architect has introduced space, light and robust materials to provide the clients with a home that would last for years.

Video timeline: 00:00 – Introduction to The Modern House 00:29 – The Architects and The Location 00:49 – A 1980s House Renovation 01:10 – The Brief 01:29 – A Walkthrough The House 02:22 – Reinstating The Original Details 02:33 – A Simple Material Palette 03:09 – Creating a Functional Home 03:21 – The Full Suite of Fisher & Paykel Appliances 03:48 – The Design of The Appliances 04:25 – The Park Setting and Views 05:08 – Working in Heritage Areas with Heritage Houses 05:40 – The Transformation of The House

Beginning the house tour from the Centennial Park entrance, the architect has reinvigorated the two formal living rooms with coffered ceilings and, where needed, has replicated the missing cornices throughout the interior architecture. Alongside this, the master bedroom has been imbued with privacy and given a luxuriously proportioned ensuite. Throughout Queens Park House, the architect has continued to infuse a fundamental connection to the gardens while also introducing a wealth of light. Responding to the client’s desire to connect to the surroundings, Pohio Adams Architects has opened the rear of the house with a series of French doors. Established to create a visual connection, the French doors enhance the modernisation of the interior while also connecting to the backyard and pool. By positioning the key living areas at the rear – the kitchen, dining and living spaces – the architect has introduced open plan living for the family’s dream home. Additionally, when designing a modern house, the architect has implemented an extra powder room and scullery laundry that sits just off the kitchen. Throughout designing a modern house, the architect has chosen black timber floors to showcase a continuity from the old parts of the home into the new. Simple oak joinery has also been employed through the main living spaces to provide a robustness and comfort to the living areas, while aged brass is used for detailing and hardware. Emphasising the home’s modern renovations, handmade Moroccan tiles have been placed in the bathrooms and kitchen. Offering comfort and warmth, the interior design connects to the exterior through material and architectural choices made by the architects when designing a modern house. To complement the interior when designing a modern house, Pohio Adams Architects has used a full suite of Fisher & Paykel appliances – including an integrated French door fridge and a kitchen island, which includes a cool drawer and full stack dishwasher, a gas cooktop, ovens and extractor hood. Following a long-standing working relationship with Fisher & Paykel, the architect has employed the brand’s appliances throughout the home to directly respond to the client’s desire to enhance the way they live for years to come.

Home Design: Pavilion House In Avalon, Australia

The Local Project – An interior designer’s own holiday home, Pavilion House reflects a studious approach to the relationship between architecture, landscaping and the internal environment. Crafted by Nina Maya Interiors and Maya Sternberg Architects, the home captures an escapist experience using an array of sculptural forms.

Video timeline: 00:00 – Introduction to the Interior Designer’s Family Holiday Home 00:35 – Introduction to Nina Maya Interiors 00:55 – The Location of the Home 01:11 – A Brief Based Around That Holiday Feeling 01:47 – Pavillion Style Architecture 02:06 – A Walkthrough of the Home 02:23 – Evoking a Ubiquitous Feeling 02:43 – The Connection Between Indoor and Outdoor 03:15 – The Landscape Architecture 04:05 – A Light-filled Home 04:27 – The Hand Carved Coffee Table 05:14 – Organic, Round Soft Forms 05:34 – Nina’s Favourite Features

Situated in Avalon, a coastal suburb of Sydney, Pavilion House stands as an interior designer’s own holiday home, settled in close proximity to the beach. As the beach house sits far back on a 1000 square-metre block, a house tour of the residence begins with a sense of land, space and privacy reminiscent of a luxury hotel. Architecturally, the building champions a pavilion style with an orderly spatial layout and front façade comprised of glass.

Entering Pavilion House, occupants find the kitchen and dining room, followed by the living quarters and, further back, all bedrooms and bathrooms. As an interior designer’s own holiday home, the residence effortlessly proposes a luxury living experience influenced by hotel designs from around the world. A seamless connection between indoor and outdoor space is maintained using doors which stack to their sides – opening the home to the external environment – and a sophisticated treatment of landscape.

Balancing aesthetics and functionality, Pavilion House is a prime example of an interior designer’s own holiday home. Having excavated a large portion of the front of the property, Nina Maya Interiors builds a refined outdoor dining area surrounded by palm trees, white pebbles and a custom marble table. In addition, the landscape features a firepit area and outdoor spa space, complete with a bar, vanity, free-standing bathtub and rain shower. The lighting of Pavilion House also nods towards its status as an interior designer’s own holiday home. In the lounge, a continuous skylight runs seven metres across the length of the room, inviting natural light to play across the plaster wall.

Raw finishes combine with a restrained colour palette to enhance the calming quality of the sunlight and sculptural furniture within the interior design. Exuding a sense of relaxation, Pavilion House is an uplifting iteration of an interior designer’s own holiday home. Nina Maya Interiors forges a strong connection between both the internal and external aspects of the home, establishing a coherent place of retreat.

Architecture Tour: Grove House In Sydney, Australia

The Local Project = Located in Sydney’s east, Grove House is a garden home that possesses a sense of community through its connection to the shared grove between the surrounding heritage houses. Supplying architecture and interior design, Clayton Orszaczky delivers a family home that wraps around its occupants like a cocoon.

Video timeline: 00:00 – Introduction to the Inner-City Garden Home 00:27 – The Architects 00:47 – Preservation of the Heritage Aspects of the Home 01:02 – A Walkthrough of Grove House 01:44 – The Clients 02:09 – Connecting to the Garden 02:27 – The Grove, A Community Garden 02:54 – The Landscape Designers 03:06 – A Contrast Between Old and New 03:34 – The Use of Concrete 04:06 – The Key Relationship Between Form and Lighting 04:30 – The Architects Favourite Moments

As the house tour begins, the desire to keep the original fabric of the house – while sensitively connecting to the new additions – can be seen through each design choice of the garden home. Inside, a careful consideration of materials and space has been infused from the original formal rooms to the dining and family living room and into the extensions.

However, it is the original timber staircase greeting guests from the entrance that establishes a graceful connection between the original home and new additions. Directly responding to the clients’ desire to connect to the gardens and grove beyond, Clayton Orszaczky encourages the new additions of the garden home to directly respond with the original fabric. A core aspect of the home, the kitchen and dining space connects to the gardens through large glass doors and windows which directly draw in both northern and eastern light.

A further dialogue between the existing home and the new was addressed by specifically choosing to emphasise the contrast of eras through the use of off-form concrete, steel windows, timber veneer, black porcelain and modern furniture. Collaborating with Tanya Wood Landscape Architect on the ground level and roof garden design, Grove House establishes a renewed connection between home and garden. Looking at the garden home from the grove, it can be seen that the soft form of the exterior contributes to the grove and the shared community space.

Continuing the house tour from the back fence to the shared grove, an immediate connection with the landscape, surrounding greenery and neighbours can be experienced. Throughout the house tour, the transition between the existing and new areas of the garden home are seen through the proportional ratios. Specifically choosing to speak to this dialogue between old and new additions, Clayton Orszaczky has used concrete for mass – similarly to how masonry was used in the original home.

Additionally, continued references to the terrace house form is seen within the new additions and the renewed relationship between light and form further contributes to the connection within the home and to the garden and grove.

Home Design: Curl Curl House, Sydney, Australia

Afforded the freedom of an open design concept, interior design practice Folk Studio crafts Curl Curl House. Showcasing the collaborative work of architectural practice TRIAS, the magical home captures the spirit of the Australian coast.

Video timeline: 00:00 – An Introduction to the Magical Home 00:38 – The Collaboration of Folk Studio and TRIAS 01:51 – Adding Intentional Gestures to the L-Shaped Floor Plan 02:32 – A Beach, Bush and Coastal Palette 02:51 – Watching Visions Come to Life 03:22 – Having the Garden as an Integral Piece of the Design 03:46 – Seeing Green from all Areas 04:11 – The Hit and Miss Brickwork Screens 04:38 – Creating a Sanctuary and an Oasis for the Clients 04:58 – Finding Joy in the Client’s Comfort

Settled into Curl Curl, the coastal suburb of Sydney located just north of the Central Business District, the same-named house reflects its immersive environment. The natural character of the local context sees bush meet coast and a beachside lifestyle cohere with suburban influence. Upon accepting the design project, Folk Studio promptly met with architectural firm TRIAS in order to solidify the creative vision – a residential sanctuary – and ensure that the architecture and interior design of the home work together to form the ideal domestic experience.

Featuring an L-shaped spatial plan, Curl Curl House encloses a collection of communal zones on its ground floor, including a living room on each end. The position of each living room marks a change from the spatial arrangement of a typical house, which sees kitchen, living and dining spaces continue on from one another. Purposefully located, the living rooms function as calming areas within the magical home, removed from the bustle of the communal zones.

Inspired by the Australian beach, bush and coast, the aesthetic palette of Curl Curl House reflects a sense of natural serenity, enhanced by contrasting injections of brickwork that pay homage to the suburban context. Integral to the design of the magical home is the garden space growing along its perimeter. As a result of TRIAS condensing the architecture of the home, the garden space is maximised and enables a natural vista to be accessed from every room of the house.

Hit-or-miss brickwork screens adorn the upper levels of the façade, intercepting the incoming natural light to create shifting visual patterns within the magical home. Achieving a residential oasis, Folk Studio and Trias craft a magical home that serves as an escape from the hectic nature of everyday life. Curl Curl House stands as a residence in which its owners can take pride, rewarded by the sense of careful curation permeating the dwelling.

Tours: Fisherman’s House, Parramatta River, Sydney

Sitting on the edge of Parramatta River, Fisherman’s House is a unique underground home with a sense of the unexpected. Without revealing all at once, the waterfront house is a unique underground home by Studio Prineas that instils moments of awe within every level.

Video Timeline: 00:00 – Introduction to the Underground Home 00:30 – The Waterfront Location of the Home 00:45 – The Original Timber Cottage 01:04 – A Minimalistic View On Arrival 01:35 – A Longstanding Friendship Between Architect and Client 02:05 – Working with an Open Design Brief for the Home 02:33 – The Original Steel Cladding 02:46 – Restoring and Reusing Original Materials from the House 03:28 – Careful Contrast of the New Wing to The Cottage 04:08 – Taking Pride in Preservation and Creation 04:30 – The Swimming Pool

Fisherman’s House is one of the last remaining timber cottages in the area that sits nine metres below the road, hidden from the public eye and offering a serene escape from the city. The client – an engineer and family friend of the architects – delivered an open design brief and sense of freedom for Studio Prineas to organically explore what the unique underground home could become.

The main desire for the client was to have the living spaces facing the water; while there was no desire to keep the original cottage, this was something that Studio Prineas knew they needed to maintain. Throughout the restoration process, removing previous cladding revealed the original weather boards underneath; inside the home, the original timber flooring and lining boards were saved to bring back the lightness of the architecture. With waterfront views from the kitchen, living and dining spaces and entertainment deck, the interior design of the original cottage defers from the new wing.

Additionally, the glazed link is a vertical connection from the original cottage to the private living spaces above. From the lightness of the timber cottage below, the upper levels speak to the rockface behind whilst offering a more grounded appearance with darker timbers. Employing concrete ceilings with rough sawn Oregon formworks that brought a timber look and imprint on the concrete, Studio Prineas established a differentiating space that still feels connected through minute details.

Conserving the history of the cottage whilst creating a contemporary unique underground home for the clients, Studio Prineas were able to embody many design ideas that they have been establishing over many years. As one of the more memorable aspects, the pool acts as one of the last additions of the unique underground home. Unexpected and holding much of the original cottage’s history, the pool offers an enchanting place to sit and watch as the sun sets over the home.

Australian Home Design: Mosman House In Sydney

On a steep slope in Mosman, on Sydney’s Lower North Shore, TKD Architects were asked not just to design a six-bedroom family home that took advantage of the views, but also to take charge of the interior architecture and styling – from the furniture and flooring right down to the artwork, bedding and even the cutlery. All their Shanghai-based clients needed to do was unlock the door and walk into their completely finished home.

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Home Tours: Turramurra Threads, Sydney, Australia

As the soothing colours of its interior spill into the garden space, Turramurra Threads feels deliberately nestled into its outdoor complement. Crafted by Benn + Penna, the calming family house is filled with a sense of peace resulting from its understated design.

Video timeline: 00:00 – An Introduction to the Calming Family House 00:30 – Location of the Home 00:43 – The Clients of the Project 01:23 – The Original House 01:51 – The Architects Brief 02:05 – Connecting the House to the Garden 02:25 – Using a Neutral Palette and Natural Materials 03:14 – The Importance of Light in the House 03:45 – The Large Skylight 04:07 – The Arch in the Living Room 04:24 – The New Extension of the Home

Surrounded by charming heritage builds on the northern outskirts of Sydney, Turramurra Threads reimagines an existing Victorian construction. The design brief called for the historic front windows and delicate ceiling detail of the calming family house to be retained whilst an extension be added to the rear, celebrating established architecture in unison with modern amenity.

Featuring the original façade, the calming family house captures a simple spatial plan, directing residents from the old structure into the new. A secondary living space and master bedroom sits perpendicular to the entrance corridor, which leads onto three bedrooms and a study. Beyond, the extension forms a primary living pavilion, opening at its far end to reveal the garden. Rays of sunlight penetrate the calming family house from three points of entry, indicating a studious approach to natural lighting and building materials.

The beams enter from a small pocket garden that serves as a transparent border between the historic and additional architecture and a large skylight positioned on the southern slope of the roof. Enhancing the functionality of a heritage home, Benn + Penna creates an open interior design that engages the garden space. Turramurra Threads is built to embrace the natural surrounds, using its subtle properties to establish a calming family house.

Architecture: Grandview House In Sydney, Australia

Balancing a striking southern perspective with a warm internal character, Grandview House overcomes the limitations of its former self. Created by Ian Bennett Design Studio, the contemporary home undergoes the tactful renovation of a pre-existing family dwelling.

Video timeline: 00:00 – Introduction to Grandview House 00:40 – A Walkthrough The Contemporary Home 01:16 – Altering The Existing House 01:42 – An Introduction to The Owners 02:14 – A Collaboration of Architect and Owner 02:50 – A Floor Plan Designed for Family Living 03:31 – Family Conscious Design 03:57 – Utilising Durable Materials 04:55 – The Architect’s Favourite Part of The Home

Situated on the southern side of the Mona Vale headland, Grandview House once existed as a cold and uninviting residence with only minimal access to sunlight. The collaboration between Ian Bennett Design Studio and the clients – one of whom heads Northern Beaches Constructions – sees the house transformed into a warm and contemporary home, capitalising on views of Mona Vale Beach, Long Reef and Manly.

Entering the contemporary home, a walkway bridge sits above the ground floor, delineating two voids which allow sunlight to stream into the home. Further into the residence, the kitchen-living-dining area flows towards the external southern aspect. Upstairs, two children’s bedrooms branch off from the bridge, whilst the southern side of the house encloses a master suite, ensuite and an additional children’s bedroom.

An open plan format expands the visual field, softening the sense of transition between spaces and encouraging residents to explore the contemporary home. Voids crafted to the east and west draw natural light into the residence – as do apertures inserted into the awning – with louvre windows maximising cross-ventilation. Crafting authoritatively in a maritime location, Ian Bennett Design Studio nods towards its working history in the Northern Beaches region. Grandview House stands as an intuitive response to its site; a contemporary home that effortlessly captures natural light and inspiring southern views. 00:00 – Introduction to Grandview House 00:40 – A Walkthrough The Contemporary Home 01:16 – Altering The Existing House 01:42 – An Introduction to The Owners 02:14 – A Collaboration of Architect and Owner 02:50 – A Floor Plan Designed for Family Living 03:31 – Family Conscious Design 03:57 – Utilising Durable Materials 04:55 – The Architect’s Favourite Part of The Home

Design: Hidden Garden House, Sydney, Australia

Imbued with a sense of tranquillity, Hidden Garden House is a minimalist residence with a restrained materiality. Designed by TRIAS in collaboration with the clients, the home emerges as a peaceful ode to simplicity.

Video timeline: 00:00 – The Local Project’s Print Publication 00:15 – Introduction to Hidden Garden House 00:40 – The Surrounding Neighbourhood 01:01 – A Walkthrough of the House 01:43 – Views from the Upper Level 01:54 – The Hidden Garden 02:13 – The Creative Clients 02:35 – Hand Made House Features from the Client 03:09 – Warmth Through Material Selections 04:17 – Taking Pride in the Project 05:09 – The Architects Favourite Features 05:38 – Subscribe to The Local Project’s Print Publication

Located in the Sydney suburb of Darlinghurst, Hidden Garden House celebrates small living on the fringe of the CBD. A house tour of the property elucidates its floor plan. Entering the home, the living room leads to an elevated dining room, which in turn flows to the kitchen space. The kitchen wraps around a courtyard garden and upstairs, the bedroom and bathroom are separated by blocks of joinery. As one of the occupants of Hidden Garden House is a ceramicist, their influence is apparent throughout the home. Terracotta floor tiles line the kitchen whilst white tiles in the lightwell bounce sunlight into the home. Brass hardware and elegant furniture also testify to the quality of the client’s work. TRIAS uses natural materials to establish a sense of warmth in Hidden Garden House. Bagged brickwork proposes a feeling of tactility, while timber floors and joinery visually soften the interior. Smaller details such as pendant lights and brass finishes speak endearingly to the idea of careful consideration. Refined and minimal, Hidden Garden House stands as a timeless residence; a ceramicist’s own home. Working closely with the clients and embracing their unique contributions, TRIAS translates a joint vision into an architectural success.