Tag Archives: Ruins

Tours: The Ancient Mayan City Of Calakmul, Mexico

Walk with us through the ancient Mayan city of Calakmul, Mexico. Our guide, Erik Mendicuti Polanco, takes us through this UNESCO World Heritage Site that doubles as the largest protected tropical forest in Mexico. The combination between the Mayan architectural style known as Petén with miles and miles of protected forest creates stunning, lush views unlike anything you’ve ever seen.

Video timeline: 0:00 Introduction 0:31 The Largest Protected Tropical Forest in Mexico 1:11 History of Calakmul 2:28 Petén Architectural Style 3:17 Origins of Calakmul 3:58 Walking Up the Sacred Mountain of Calakmul 4:52 The Best View in the Mayan World 5:45 Into the Rain

Views: Diocletian’s Palace Ruins, Split, Croatia (4K)

Diocletian’s Palace is an ancient palace built for the Roman emperor  Diocletian at the turn of the fourth century AD, which today forms about half the old town of Split, Croatia. While it is referred to as a “palace” because of its intended use as the retirement residence of Diocletian, the term can be misleading as the structure is massive and more resembles a large fortress: about half of it was for Diocletian’s personal use, and the rest housed the military garrison.

The complex was built on a peninsula six kilometres southwest from Salona, the former capital of Dalmatia, one of the largest cities of the late empire with 60,000 people and the birthplace of Diocletian. The terrain around Salona slopes gently seaward and is typical karst, consisting of low limestone ridges running east to west with marl in the clefts between them. Today the remains of the palace are part of the historic core of Split, which in 1979 was listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

Roman Ruins: Hadrian’s Villa, Tivoli, Italy (4K)

Hadrian’s Villa is a UNESCO World Heritage Site comprising the ruins and archaeological remains of a large villa complex built c. AD 120 by Roman Emperor Hadrian at Tivoli outside Rome. The site is owned by the Republic of Italy and has been managed since 2014 by the Polo Museale del Lazio. 

Travel Views: The Ruins Of Ayutthaya In Thailand (4K)

Ayutthaya is a city in Thailand, about 80 kilometers north of Bangkok. It was capital of the Kingdom of Siam, and a prosperous international trading port, from 1350 until razed by the Burmese in 1767. The ruins of the old city now form the Ayutthaya Historical Park, an archaeological site that contains palaces, Buddhist temples, monasteries and statues. The park is on an island between 3 rivers. 

Photography: Frédéric Chaubin’s ‘Ancient Castles of Europe’ (Taschen)

Shot on film with a Linhof view camera, the collection is the outcome of five years of travel and investigation. Complete with a practical map and explanatory essay, its castles tell the story of 400 years, unfolding through the feudal Middle Ages into the 15th century.

Follow photographer Frédéric Chaubin as he embarks on a unique, century-spanning journey through Europe. Featuring images of more than 200 buildings in 21 countries, Stone Age presents the history and architecture of the most magical medieval castles of the continent in an unprecedented collection.

Building on the success of his foray into Soviet design with CCCP, Chaubin once again documents the afterlife of highly rational structures that seem out of place in a modern-day world. Precursors of Brutalism, these castles value function over form and epitomize the raw materials and shapes that would go on to define so much of architectural history.

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Ancient Views: Chichén Itzá – Mexico (4K Video)

Chichén Itzá is a complex of Mayan ruins on Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula. A massive step pyramid, known as El Castillo or Temple of Kukulcan, dominates the ancient city, which thrived from around 600 A.D. to the 1200s. Graphic stone carvings survive at structures like the ball court, Temple of the Warriors and the Wall of the Skulls. Nightly sound-and-light shows illuminate the buildings’ sophisticated geometry. 

History: ‘Turkmenistan – Cultural Treasures’

To outsiders, Turkmenistan is one of the world’s least known countries. For the first time in ten years, a film crew has been free to visit spectacular excavation sites and follow international researchers into areas that have long been off-limits. Once considered the poorest part of the Soviet Union, oil and natural gas have brought new wealth to Turkmenistan today.

A little known fact in the West is that 4,000 years ago, the country was home to one of the ancient world’s centers of power. Although it flourished around the same time as the advanced civilizations of Mesopotamia and Egypt, the Margiana empire was later largely forgotten. But recently, archaeologists have discovered palace buildings and magnificent burial treasures at the site of the capital, Gonur Depe, in the Karakum Desert. Incredible aerial photography shows the dimensions of the lost metropolis. An international team of researchers also unearthed monumental fortifications in neighboring Ulug Depe.

The ruined cities of Merv and Kunya-Urgench have been declared UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Suddenly, historians and the media are paying much more attention to Central Asia. Why has Turkmenistan seen powerful empires rise and fall since the Bronze Age? DNA analysis shows a highly mobile population, whose contacts reached as far as India, the Urals and the Mediterranean Sea. The Silk Road between China and Europe was the world’s most important trade route for thousands of years, lending Turkmenistan great historical significance. Since the fall of the Soviet Union, the country has been slowly opening up to international researchers, and its astounding cultural heritage is coming to light.

Views: Parícutin Volcano Church Ruins, San Juan Parangaricutiro, Mexico

Located in the state of Michoacán  Mexico, this church is the only remaining building left from the village of San Juan Parangaricutiro. On February 20, 1943, a volcano began to erupt, slowly consuming two villages in lava and ash.

It took almost a year for the lava to reach and melt the rocks around this small church. The Paricutin volcano continued to erupt for another eight years, but the small church withstood it all.

Nuevo San Juan Parangaricutiro is a small village in the Mexican state of Michoacán near the Parícutin volcano. The city is called “Nuevo” because the original San Juan Parangaricutiro was destroyed during the formation of the Parícutin volcano in 1943.

Parícutin is a cinder cone volcano located in the Mexican state of Michoacán, near the city of Uruapan and about 322 kilometers west of Mexico City. The volcano surged suddenly from the cornfield of local farmer Dionisio Pulido in 1943, attracting both popular and scientific attention.

English History: Roman Ruins In Northumberland

Northumberland is one of Britain’s most historic regions, an archaeological treasure trove of impressive buildings that date back to the Roman conquest: From Hadrian’s Wall to the Vindolanda Fort.

From Aerial Britain: https://bit.ly/38DQJao