Tag Archives: Aircraft

Views: $30 Million ‘Super Scooper’ CL-415EAF Plane Fighting U.S. Wildfires

This $30 million Super Scooper is the only plane in the world that was designed specifically to fight wildfires. The aircraft performs a dangerous dive down to a body of water, scoops up 1,400 gallons of water in 12 seconds, and drops its load of water on raging forest fires. We went inside this massive aircraft to find out how it works, what it takes to fly it, and why it’s considered the most efficient aerial-firefighting aircraft in the world.

WWII Aviation: The ‘P-51 Mustang’ Fighter Plane

The P-51 was the darling of the Army Air Forces. Aerodynamically agile and acrobatic, the Mustang was fast and furious in its effectiveness in downing enemy aircraft. A latecomer to World War II, it first saw combat over Europe near the end of 1943. The long-range fighter proved to be just what the Allies needed to escort bombers to and from Germany as they hammered enemy targets.

Aug. 2, 2021, 6 a.m.

“In terms of the air war over Europe with the strategic bombing campaign, the P-51 was a war-winning weapon,” says Jeremy Kinney, associate director of research and curatorial affairs at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum. “As a fighter escort, it enabled the successful bombing of targets deep in Nazi Germany from bases in England and Italy. That was a crucial component in the destruction of strategic sites such as factories and munition plants.”

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California Views: ‘Palm Springs Air Museum’

The Palm Springs Air Museum, is a non-profit educational institution in Palm Springs, Riverside County, California. The Museum’s mission is to exhibit, educate and eternalize the role of the World War II combat aircraft and the role the pilots and American citizens had in winning the war. 

Future Air Travel: ‘Lillium’ – 7-Seat Electric Vertical Take-Off & Land Jet (Video)

Lilium can revolutionize regional travel, saving people hours not minutes. Using its 7-Seater Lilium Jet, revealed March 30, 2021. Lilium’s regional shuttle service will enable sustainable, high-speed transportation. The 7-Seater Lilium Jet has market-leading capacity and is the first of Lilium’s serial aircraft.

It is capable of quiet vertical take-off, allowing Lilium access to more landing sites and the opportunity to build higher network density, avoiding the need for expensive ground infrastructure. The 7-Seater Lilium Jet and regional shuttle service business model are projected to deliver the best unit economics, with passenger and enterprise opportunities.

The Lilium 7-Seater Jet

The Lilium 7-Seater Jet has a projected cruise speed of 175 mph at 10,000 feet and a range of 155+ miles, including reserves. It is the culmination of five years of technology development across four generations of technology demonstrators, including Lilium’s full-scale 5-Seater.

Lilium applied for concurrent type certification for a high-capacity aircraft with EASA and the FAA in 2018. Development of the 7-Seater Lilium Jet began in stealth mode following this milestone. In 2020 the 7-Seater Lilium Jet received CRI-A01 certification basis from EASA.

Lilium has successfully developed, tested and refined the underlying technology for electric vertical take-off and landing jets – Lilium’s proprietary Ducted Electric Vectored Thrust (“DEVT”) technology, along with key control systems, aircraft and battery architecture. DEVT technology enables Lilium to scale to higher-capacity aircraft and keep noise emissions and ground footprint low.

Supersonic: ‘Concorde – Fall Of A Legend’ (Video)

The Concorde was one of the most spectacular passenger aircraft ever built. But 113 people died when a French Concorde crashed in July 2000. Soon afterward, the era of the supersonic passenger plane came to an end.

The legend of the Concorde lives on, not least because it was a technical marvel. For 30 years, it thundered across the Atlantic at the speed of a bullet: Concorde could outrun the clock, arriving in New York earlier than it had departed Paris or London. Only a few could afford to fly at double the speed of sound: executives, pop stars and luxury vacationers who didn’t balk at ticket prices of around $10,000.

The disaster occurred on July 25, 2000, near Paris. It still raises questions. Few know that on that fateful day two Concordes left Paris for New York due to a high number of passengers flying to board a cruise. Travelers had the ability to switch their booking between two flights, a decision that would cost some of them their lives. This documentary tells the eventful story of supersonic flight, including other planes like the Soviet TU-144, known as “Konkordski”. Plans for a new supersonic passenger jet have long been in the works. The first prototypes are on the way, but air travelers still have a while to wait before they can again reach supersonic speeds.

Analysis: The Catastrophic Failures Of The Boeing 777 Aircraft Engines (Video)

A type of Pratt & Whitney engine on Boeing 777s has failed catastrophically three times in a three-year span. Federal investigators are trying to figure out why.

Aviation: ‘Top Ten New Planes Of 2021 & Beyond’

Despite the recent disruption in air travel, engineers have never stopped working on more technological aircraft that will be reshaping the way we traverse the skies during the third decade of the 21st century. The end goal of the new planes are cleaner and more efficient propulsion systems, better flight autonomy and safety, and surely added in-flight comforts when it comes to passenger jets. In today’s episode we will be exploring the latest aviation news and model introductions,

Aviation: The ‘Ten Most Innovative Amphibious Aircrafts’ (Video)

From aquatic planes to amphibious aircraft, taking off and landing on the water can be beneficial. Amphibious planes can be used for fishing, search and rescue, and even anti-submarine warfare. let’s take a look at the 10 most innovative amphibious planes.

Future Of Air Travel: ‘Airbus ZEROe – Next-Gen Hydrogen Planes’ (Video)

Airbus has revealed three concepts for the world’s first zero-emission commercial aircraft which could enter service by 2035. These concepts each represent a different approach to achieving zero-emission flight, exploring various technology pathways and aerodynamic configurations in order to support the company’s ambition of leading the way in the decarbonisation of the entire aviation industry.

All of these concepts rely on hydrogen as a primary power source – an option which Airbus believes holds exceptional promise as a clean aviation fuel and is likely to be a solution for aerospace and many other industries to meet their climate-neutral targets.

The three concepts – all codenamed “ZEROe” – for a first climate neutral zero-emission commercial aircraft include: 

•A turbofan design (120-200 passengers) with a range of 2,000+ nautical miles, capable of operating transcontinentally and powered by a modified gas-turbine engine running on hydrogen, rather than jet fuel, through combustion. The liquid hydrogen will be stored and distributed via tanks located behind the rear pressure bulkhead.

• A turboprop design (up to 100 passengers) using a turboprop engine instead of a turbofan and also powered by hydrogen combustion in modified gas-turbine engines, which would be capable of traveling more than 1,000 nautical miles, making it a perfect option for short-haul trips.

• A “blended-wing body” design (up to 200 passengers) concept in which the wings merge with the main body of the aircraft with a range similar to that of the turbofan concept. The exceptionally wide fuselage opens up multiple options for hydrogen storage and distribution, and for cabin layout. 

Aviation: Covid May Spur Carbon-Neutral Flights

As much of the aviation industry fights to survive the coronavirus pandemic, some economists and engineers see the crisis as an opportunity to use stimulus funds to propel air travel to a carbon-neutral future.

Photo illustration: George Downs