Tag Archives: Smithsonian Magazine

Previews: Smithsonian Magazine – October 2022

Cover for October 2022

Smithsonian Magazine October 2022 Issue:

Founding Force

How America’s “first politician” galvanized a colony—and helped set a revolution in motion. BY STACY SCHIFF

Glen Canyon Reveals Its Secrets

Water woes threaten America’s second largest reservoir—but leave new vistas in their wake. PHOTOGRAPHS AND TEXT BY PETE MCBRIDE

Tolkien’s World

Haunted by the approach of another world war, the beloved fantasy author created a new story of Middle-earth that few people even knew about—until now. BY JOHN GARTH, PHOTOGRAPHS BY KIERAN DODDS

Ray of Hope

The giant fish faces threats from poachers, boat strikes and climate change. PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALEX MUSTARD, TEXT BY TERENCE MONMANEY

 

Scents and Sensibility

From the lab to the art gallery, the latest efforts to understand the fragrant, musky, stinky and utterly baffling world of your nose

BY ABIGAIL TUCKER

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CAROLINE TOMPKINS

Previews: Smithsonian Magazine – September 2022

Smithsonian Magazine    In Search of King Arthur  September image 1


SCIENCE

Cougars Are Killing Feral Donkeys, and That’s Good for Wetlands

Mountain lions play an important role in the Death Valley ecosystem by preying on the introduced species

Sam Zlotnik

SCIENCE

How Long Will It Take to Understand Long Covid?

SCIENCE

The Incredible Story of the Iceberg That Sank the Titanic


SMART NEWS

Why Was a Synagogue Mural Hidden Behind a Wall in a Vermont Apartment?

August 22, 2022 8:35 a.m.


Did Archaeologists Find Saint Peter’s Birthplace?

August 19, 2022


Western States Are Fighting Over How to Conserve Shrinking Water Supply

August 19, 2022

Previews: Smithsonian Magazine – July/Aug 2022

Smithsonian

The Forest and the Taboo

Famed American biologist Patricia Wright explores an astonishing breadth of biodiversity in the wilderness of Madagascar

BY DYAN MACHAN – PHOTOGRAPHS BY NOEL ROWE

 

The Long Haul

America’s fascination with trains is fast-tracked in this study of passing freight

PHOTOGRAPHS BY STEPHEN MALLON – TEXT BY TERENCE MONMANEY

 

The Race to Save Ukraine’s Sacred Art

JOSHUA HAMMER

Preview: Smithsonian Magazine – June 2022

June 2022

Cover for June 2022

FEATURES

 

Flesh, Blood & Bronze

One sculptor and his team of artists take on the epic project of conveying the century-old conflict through a massive bronze installation

BY JEFF MACGREGOR

PHOTOGRAPHS BY VINCENT TULLO

 

Not Far From Kyiv

To residents of Southern California with ties to the Eastern European nations, the conflict feels close to home

PHOTOGRAPHS AND INTERVIEWS BY STELLA KALININA

 

In a Tight Spot

Conservationists are racing to rescue a delightful coastal animal from rising seas

PHOTOGRAPH BY LAUREN OWENS LAMBERT

TEXT BY MADDIE BENDER

 

The Real Pinocchio

Forget what you know from the cartoon. The 19th-century story, now in a new translation, was a rallying cry for universal education and Italian nationhood

BY PERRI KLASS

PHOTOGRAPHS BY SIMONA GHIZZONI

 

Escape from the Gilded Cage

Even if her husband was a murderer, a woman in a bad marriage once had few options. Unless she fled to South Dakota

BY APRIL WHITE

DEPARTMENTS

Discussion

Ethical Collecting

For more than a century, museum artifacts were acquired in ways we no longer find acceptable. How can we repair the damage?

Popular Wisdom

The world’s largest book repository has expanded far beyond its original scope to include sound recordings and digitized collections

Van Gogh in the Grove

A new exhibition of lesser known works during a pivotal time sheds light on his budding genius

Role of a Lifetime

An unpublished memoir reveals how the world’s most famous child actress became a star of the environmental movement

A Brief History of Red Drink

The obscure roots of a centuries-old beverage that’s now a Juneteenth fixture

The Next Clone

Forget Dolly the Sheep. The birth of a mouse named Cumulina 25 years ago launched a genetic revolution

Previews: Smithsonian Magazine – May 2022

FEATURES

 

There’s Plenty of Juice on Block Island

Block Island, off the New England coast, overcame political strife to lead the way on energy independence

 

Welcome Back

A hunting ban has fostered the return of a nearly extinct species

 

Why Did the Salamander Cross the Road?

To reproduce, of course. And a band of volunteers gathers at night to help it—and countless other amphibians—get to the other side

 

Making the Connection

In the sparse Utah desert, the vital contributions of these 19th-century laborers are finally coming to light

 

Italian Renaissance

Take a photographic tour through the country’s effort to revitalize its rural towns

WWII Aviation: The ‘P-51 Mustang’ Fighter Plane

The P-51 was the darling of the Army Air Forces. Aerodynamically agile and acrobatic, the Mustang was fast and furious in its effectiveness in downing enemy aircraft. A latecomer to World War II, it first saw combat over Europe near the end of 1943. The long-range fighter proved to be just what the Allies needed to escort bombers to and from Germany as they hammered enemy targets.

Aug. 2, 2021, 6 a.m.

“In terms of the air war over Europe with the strategic bombing campaign, the P-51 was a war-winning weapon,” says Jeremy Kinney, associate director of research and curatorial affairs at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum. “As a fighter escort, it enabled the successful bombing of targets deep in Nazi Germany from bases in England and Italy. That was a crucial component in the destruction of strategic sites such as factories and munition plants.”

Read more

Top Travel Videos: “Aerial America – Maryland / Delaware” (Smithsonian)

 

Maryland and Delaware are two small states of great historical significance. Highlighted by the great bays of the eastern seaboard: Chesapeake and Delaware, both states are defined by the legacies of their colonial pasts. This aerial journey reveals their giant stature in the history of America.

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Top Podcasts: Alexander Von Humboldt – “The Last Man Who Knew It All”

Smithsonian Sidedoor PodcastAlexander von Humboldt might not be a name you know, but you can bet you know his ideas. Back when the United States were a wee collection of colonies huddled on the eastern seaboard, colonists found the wilderness surrounding them scary. 

It took a zealous Prussian explorer with a thing for barometers to show the colonists what they couldn’t see: a global ecosystem, and their own place in nature. In this The Invention of Nature Alexander von Humborldt's New World Andrea Wulfepisode, we learn how Humboldt—through science and art—inspired a key part of America’s national identity.

More fascinating Humboldt facts:

  • He strongly opposed slavery in the early 19th century, calling it the “greatest of all the evils which have afflicted mankind.”
  • He was the first to theorize human caused climate change by changing how water flows through a landscape, on a local level, and warned about deforestation.
  • He invented isotherms, the lines on a weather map that we still use today. He used them to show which parts of the world were experiencing similar temperatures.
  • He made the world’s most detailed map of Mexico and the American west.
  • He nearly summited what was then thought to be the world’s tallest mountain (while wearing 18th century wools, no less.).
  • Another thing Humboldt and Jefferson bonded over? Mastodons. Humboldt was the first to discover remains of a species now known as Cuvieronius hyodon in Ecuador, which were similar to the “giant elephants” being found in Ohio. The teeth Humboldt found were the clue that these weren’t modern elephants; they looked pretty different. And because these teeth looked sharp, Jefferson and some American scientists thought they were for meat eating! Eventually Georges Cuvier, a French scientist who was friends with Humboldt, proved that these were different from Indian and African elephants, and even woolly mammoths—and the species eventually ended up renamed after him. One of the few eponymous misses for our friend Humboldt!

If you’re interested in learning more about the life and times of Alexander von Humboldt, I’d recommend reading Andrea Wulf’s book The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World.

History Podcasts: 100 Years Ago Charles Ponzi And His “Scheme” Were Arrested (Podcast)

Nearly 100 years ago, Charles Ponzi stumbled across a loophole in the international postal system and turned it into one of the most infamous scams of all time. This time on Sidedoor, we follow Ponzi from his early days until his epic downfall, and hear from a postal investigator trained to catch swindlers like Ponzi who continue to use the U.S. mail for nefarious purposes.

Smithsonian Podcasts

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