All posts by boomersdaily

Online News, Views & Reviews magazine for Baby Boomers and Beyond (The 55+). Featuring news, finance, retirement planning, health/fitness, travel, current affairs, politics, home design, literature, & art.

Venezuela Views: Colonia Tovar Is “Little Germany”

DW Travel – Where can you find half-timbered houses, German beer, and Black Forest cake in South America? Colonia Tovar. DW’s Joel Dullroy visited the Venezuelan tourist attraction, where he felt transported back to the heart of the Black Forest. The town has a population of roughly 20,000 people, and was founded by German immigrants around 150 years ago. Not much has changed there since then.

Colonia Tovar is a town of Venezuela, capital of the municipality Tovar in Aragua state. It is located about 65.5 km west of Caracas. It was founded on April 8, 1843, by a group of 390 immigrants from the then independent state of the Grand Duchy of Baden.

Books: TLS/Times Literary Supplement – Dec 9, 2022

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Times Literary Supplement (December 9, 2022) @TheTLS: Features @jennieerinsmith on the Huxleys; @TristramHuntVA on Birkbeck; @lib_thinks on Lady Glenconner; @jamesbpcook on fatherhood; @MisakCheryl on John Venn; @snsyquia on this year’s Michael @MarksAwards – and more.

Books: New York Review Of Books – Dec 22, 2022

December 22, 2022 issue cover

The New York Review of Books – December 22, 2022:

‘Competitive Consumption’

An exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art displays the extravagant Tudor taste for jewels, artworks, tapestries, and other finery.

The Tudors: Art and Majesty in Renaissance England an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, October 10, 2022–January 8, 2023; the Cleveland Museum of Art, February 26–May 14, 2023; and the Legion of Honor, San Francisco, June 24–September 24, 2023

Writing the Furies

The essayist Judith Thurman has made a career of profiling complicated, often unstoppable women.

A Left-Handed Woman by Judith Thurman

The Sea, the Sea

Rachel Carson’s ocean books reveal an author profoundly engaged with the problem of how to convey ecological knowledge—and how to decenter human life.

The Sea Trilogy: Under the Sea-Wind, The Sea Around Us, The Edge of the Sea by Rachel Carson, edited by Sandra Steingraber

News: China’s Foreign Police Stations, South Africa Impeachment

We discuss reports of China operating more than 100 police stations abroad, plus: South Africa’s parliament votes on impeaching President Cyril Ramaphosa, Indonesia bans sex outside of marriage and what will Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva’s presidency mean for indigenous tribes in the Amazon?

Front Page: The New York Times – December 7, 2022

Trump’s Company Is Guilty of Tax Fraud, a Blow to the Firm and the Man

Prosecutors did not indict the former president, but they invoked him throughout the monthlong trial. The Trump Organization had been his springboard to fame and power.

Warnock defeats Walker in Georgia’s Senate runoff.

In the final battle of the 2022 midterms, Senator Raphael Warnock dealt another blow to Donald Trump, whose handpicked candidate, Herschel Walker, was outspent and outmatched.

House Jan. 6 Committee Signals It Will Issue Criminal Referrals

Speaking before a formal decision had been made, Representative Bennie Thompson said his panel had not yet agreed on who would be the subject of the referrals or what the charges would be.

Inside the Face-Off Between Russia and a Small Internet Access Firm

The cat-and-mouse experience of Proton, a Swiss company, shows what it’s like to be targeted by Russian censors — and what it takes to fight back.

Literary Preview: The Paris Review – Winter 2022 – 2023

No photo description available.

The Paris Review – December/Winter 2022:

Colm Tóibín on the Art of Fiction: “No matter what you do in a novel there’s a secret DNA of whatever it is that you’ve suffered.” N. Scott Momaday on the Art of Poetry: “I was writing lines that looked like lines of poetry, recollecting my early days on the reservation, but I didn’t know the difference between a spondee and a dactyl.”

FICTION

Mieko Kanai – Tap Water

Addie E. Citchens – A Good Samaritan

Sophie Madeline Dess – Zalmanovs

Tom Drury – Where Does This Live?

Isabella Hammad – Gertrude

Lucas Hnathfrom –  Old Actress

Kate Riley – L. R.

Avigayl Sharp – Uncontrollable, Irrelevant

Prose by Avigayl Sharp, Lucas Hnath, and Mieko Kanai.

Poetry by William IX of Aquitaine, Cynthia Cruz, and Peter Mishler.

Art by Mary Manning and Lily van der Stokker.

Cover by Uman.

Arts & Literature: The Top Nine Art Books Of 2022

The Art Newspaper (December 6, 2022) – The books team at The Art Newspaper has waded through the piles of art tomes published this year so you don’t have too. Below, each editor has picked three publications that shone through in 2022.

A Revolution on Canvas: The Rise of Women Artists in Britain and France 1760-1830 by Paris A. Spies-Gans (Paul Mellon Centre/Yale)

The miniaturist Sarah Biffen (subject of the excellent Without Hands show at Philip Mould gallery in London, until 12 December, and accompanying publication), born with no arms or legs, was one of many professional women artists to exhibit in major venues in Paris and London between 1760 and 1830, beyond the few currently celebrated (Angelica Kauffman, Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, etc.), as Spies-Gans’s exhaustive, groundbreaking research reveals in this beautifully produced book.

Käthe Kollwitz: A Survey of Her Works 1888-1942, edited by Hannelore Fischer (Hirmer/Käthe Kollwitz Museum)

This year has been a particularly good one for stand-alone publishing on historic and Modern women artists, and women’s significant influence within the international art world—fingers crossed this signals a shift (at last) from niche to mainstream. Honourable mention goes to Lund Humphries’s Illuminating Women Artists series, with two books in the bag (Luisa Roldán and Artemisia Gentileschi) and two more scheduled for 2023 (Elisabetta Sirani and Rosalba Carriera). It was a brutal selection process, but the first of my top three, from the many excellent books we reviewed over the last year, is Fischer’s Käthe Kollwitz. Kollwitz’s brilliance requires no introduction, but this exquisitely illustrated survey, while exploring her many iconic works, draws attention to lesser-known imagery including her subtly erotic subjects.

Jo van Gogh-Bonger: The Woman Who Made Vincent Famous by Hans Luijten, translated by Lynne Richards (Bloomsbury)

Chicago University Press’s first English translation of the Parisian art dealer Berthe Weill’s 1933 memoir was pipped to the post by this superb biography of the equally extraordinary Jo van Gogh-Bonger. So much has been written on Vincent van Gogh that you wonder what more can be said. It turns out much more on the woman who was the early driving force behind the Dutch artist’s legacy.

Gareth Harris, book club co-editor and chief contributing editor

Monumental Lies: Culture Wars and the Truth About the Past by Robert Bevan (Verso)

More and more commentators are making their voices heard in the clamour around today’s so-called “culture wars”, outlining the ideologies behind the destruction of, for instance, historic statues. Bevan astutely argues that those who manipulate our cultural past are shaping our future, making the case that historic buildings have become battlegrounds for right-wing and nationalist political arguments. Interestingly, he also questions the authority of Unesco. In one of many polemics, he says: “At the same time as its role in protecting culture has become suffocated by national interests, Unesco now appears to operate on the premise that any wartime damage should be undone.”

The Value of Art by Michael Findlay (Prestel)

This updated version of The Value of Art, first published in 2012, features important new material, focusing on, for instance, the rise of NFTs. Findlay asks, “where are the NFT art critics?… there is little discourse on the relative aesthetic qualities of the images themselves”. He also has strong opinions on “protest art”, saying: “In very broad terms, artists represent the protesting class while collectors represent the museum trustee class, and while the cultural ecosystem needs both, on issues of social justice they are often on different sides of the barricades.”

The Art of Activism and the Activism of Art by Gregory Sholette (Lund Humphries)

As a key member of the activist group Gulf Labor Coalition, Gregory Sholette has a unique perspective. Sholette examines this fascinating subject “from the perspective of an artist and activist who has been active in the field since the 1980s,” writes the art historian Marcus Verhagen in the introduction. This informed analysis spans more than 60 years of art activism, from the Situationist International group of social revolutionaries (1957-72), which directly engaged with the student uprisings in Paris in May 1968, to Black Lives Matter today, which has “unquestionably set a new high bar for protest aesthetics”, Sholette says.


José da Silva, book club co-editor and exhibitions editor

Stop Tanks With Books by Mark Neville (Nazraeli Press)

Neville’s photobook of Ukrainian life before Russia’s invasion in February is both a call to arms—the photographer sent 750 free copies to influential people who might “have it in their power to help Ukraine”—and a stark reminder that Ukraine was already at war in its east, as depicted in the photographs of soldiers manning trenches and checkpoints. However, it is the tender portraits of everyday life—people at the beach, in school, at a rave, eating ice cream—that really bring home the tragedy that has unfolded in Ukraine.

The Baby on the Fire Escape: Creativity, Motherhood and the Mind-Baby Problem by Julie Phillips (W. W. Norton & Company)

While most of the case studies in this book are from the literary world, the opening section on Alice Neel is a searing account of the complexities of balancing (or not) being a mother and an artist—and the often heavy price women pay. Neel, for example, can sometimes come across as brutal and uncaring, but these labels would rarely be used to describe an artist father in the same situation. Neel said that for much of her life she felt she “didn’t have the right to paint because I had two sons”. The book explores the difficult issues around the subject with no judgment and or neat conclusions—and is all the richer for it.

Raphael by David Ekserdjian, Tom Henry et al. (National Gallery Global Ltd)

If you missed the standout Raphael show at London’s National Gallery earlier this year, its catalogue is the next best thing. The rich imagery and texts make it the perfect coffee table book for art history buffs to dip into over the holiday season. There are also tasty titbits to tell the family over Christmas lunch, such as the belief that the Vatican’s foundations began cracking at news of Raphael’s death. Or when Munich’s Alte Pinakothek sold Raphael’s masterpiece Bindo Altoviti because it was believed at the time to have been painted by his assistant Giulio Romano, to buy what turned out to be a discredited Matthias Grünewald…

Aerial Views: Braga In Northwestern Portugal

Mesmerizing Time – Braga is a city in the far north of Portugal, northeast of Porto. It’s known for its religious heritage and events. To the east, Bom Jesus do Monte complex has a neoclassical church atop an elaborate 17-flight stairway. In the city center, medieval Braga Cathedral is home to a sacred art museum and the Gothic-style Kings’ Chapel. Nearby, the imposing Archbishop’s Palace overlooks Santa Barbara Garden.

Homes: Interior Designers Transform Same Bedroom

Architectural Digest – We gave interior designers Lula Galeano, Laura Hodges, and Alvin Wayne a photo of the spacious bedroom – then asked each of them to create a design for it in their particular style, however they pleased. Three artists, one canvas, each bringing something different to space. See which designer comes closest to creating the bedroom you see in your dreams.

Books: London Review Of Books – December 15, 2022

Laleh Khalili · LRB

London Review of Books (LRB) – December 15, 2022:

In Clover: What does McKinsey do?

When McKinsey Comes to Town: The Hidden Influence of the World’s Most Powerful Consulting Firm by Walt Bogdanich and Michael Forsythe.

The primary product sold by all management consultants – both software developers and strategic organisers – is the theology of capital. This holds that workers are expendable. They can be replaced by machines, or by harder-working employees grateful they weren’t let go in the last round of redundancies. Managers are necessary to the functioning of corporations – or universities, or non-profit organisations – and the more of them the better.

Down among the Press Lords

Writing about the press by Andrew O’Hagan, Ross McKibbin, Jenny Diski, James Meek, Suzanne Moore, Mary-Kay Wilmers, Alan Rusbridger, Thomas Nagel and Raymond Williams.