Tag Archives: Malaysia

Walking Tours: Malacca In Southwest Malaysia

Malacca City (also spelled Melaka) is the capital of the coastal state of Malacca, in southwestern Malaysia. At its center, Jonker Street, Chinatown’s main thoroughfare, is known for antique shops and its night market. Nearby, the 17th-century Chinese Cheng Hoon Teng temple has ornate decorations and multiple prayer halls. A green, 3-tiered roof tops the 18th-century, Javanese-influenced Kampung Kling Mosque. 

Views: Kuala Lumpur – Capital Of Malaysia (4K)

Kuala Lumpur is the capital of Malaysia. Its modern skyline is dominated by the 451m-tall Petronas Twin Towers, a pair of glass-and-steel-clad skyscrapers with Islamic motifs. The towers also offer a public skybridge and observation deck. The city is also home to British colonial-era landmarks such as the Kuala Lumpur Railway Station and the Sultan Abdul Samad Building. 

Malaysia: Land Battle For Durian – “King Of Fruits”

Durian is the king of fruits in Asia, and demand is off the charts. Farmers in Malaysia are cashing in on the craze. And even the royal family wants in. But this growing business has come at a cost. Now, small farmers are stuck in a ruthless land battle with a big corporate and the local government.

Views: Hawk-Eagles And Oriental Pied Hornbills Hunt Bats In Malaysia

Hawk-eagles and hornbills play to their unique strengths as they pluck bats mid-flight.

The oriental pied hornbill is an Indo-Malayan pied hornbill, a large canopy-dwelling bird belonging to the family Bucerotidae. Two other common names for this species are Sunda pied hornbill and Malaysian pied hornbill. The species is considered to be among the smallest and most common of the Asian hornbills.

Skyline Views: ‘Kuala Lumpur – Malaysia’ (4K)

Kuala Lumpur is the capital of Malaysia. Its modern skyline is dominated by the 451m-tall Petronas Twin Towers, a pair of glass-and-steel-clad skyscrapers with Islamic motifs. The towers also offer a public skybridge and observation deck. The city is also home to British colonial-era landmarks such as the Kuala Lumpur Railway Station and the Sultan Abdul Samad Building. 

Retirement: ’12 Countries With Low Cost Of Living’

If you’re considering retirement abroad, you need information, and you need lots of it. But more than that, you need guidance on how to interpret that information. In many cases, you could decrease your monthly expenses, perhaps significantly, simply by relocating to a new country. Depending where in the world you choose to retire, you could enjoy big savings on housing, and other expenses. There are many tempting places in Europe, Latin America and Asia where you can live large on a small budget. You’ll also need to consider the visa application and residency process for moving to these countries. The countries mentioned in this video are some of the best option for retiring comfortably with low cost of living and access to healthcare. These countries are catching on quickly by attracting retirees with enticing retirement plans. So here are 12 Best countries to retire comfortably.

  1. Portugal
  2. Costa Rica
  3. Malaysia
  4. Ecuador
  5. Slovenia
  6. Thailand
  7. Greece
  8. Vietnam
  9. Mexico
  10. Philippines
  11. Uruguay
  12. Mauritius

Aerial Travel: ‘Kuala Lumpur – Malaysia’ (Video)

Kuala Lumpur is the capital of Malaysia. Its modern skyline is dominated by the 451m-tall Petronas Twin Towers, a pair of glass-and-steel-clad skyscrapers with Islamic motifs. The towers also offer a public skybridge and observation deck. The city is also home to British colonial-era landmarks such as the Kuala Lumpur Railway Station and the Sultan Abdul Samad Building.

Malaysia is a Southeast Asian country occupying parts of the Malay Peninsula and the island of Borneo. It’s known for its beaches, rainforests and mix of Malay, Chinese, Indian and European cultural influences. The capital, Kuala Lumpur, is home to colonial buildings, busy shopping districts such as Bukit Bintang and skyscrapers such as the iconic, 451m-tall Petronas Twin Towers. 

Travel Videos: Top Ten Places To Visit In Malaysia

If countries were awarded for diversity, Malaysia would top first place. Not only is Malaysia a melting pot of ethnic cultures, but it is also a blend of many different customs, cuisines and religions all coexisting peacefully together. From large island groups to mountains and tropical rainforest, the country’s geography is every bit as diverse. What’s more, Malaysia is a unique country in that is divided into two main landmasses. West Malaysia occupies the southern half of a peninsula shared with Thailand, while East Malaysia is situated on the Borneo island. Here’s a look at the best places to visit in Malaysia.

Malaysia is a Southeast Asian country occupying parts of the Malay Peninsula and the island of Borneo. It’s known for its beaches, rainforests and mix of Malay, Chinese, Indian and European cultural influences. The capital, Kuala Lumpur, is home to colonial buildings, busy shopping districts such as Bukit Bintang and skyscrapers such as the iconic, 451m-tall Petronas Twin Towers.

The Future Of Cities: “BiodiverCity” In Malaysia – “Urban Lilypad Islands”

BiodiverCity is conceived as an Urban Mosaic of three diverse islands, and a set of urban design guidelines for mixing programs, addressing pedestrian and mobility networks, building sustainably and harvesting resources. The three islands bring together mixed-use districts, establishing habitat connectivity and supporting edge ecologies in reserves, parks, corridors and urban plazas.

The Channels, BiodiverCity’s first island, is constructed in three complementary phases: in Phase 1, Active Destinations include a wave pool and technology park; in Phase 2, a Civic Heart establishes governance and research institutions in the area; and in Phase 3, a Cultural Coast builds upon the heritage and vibrant creative energy of Penang’s George Town to create a regional and international draw.

As the heart of the district, the Channels’ 500-acre digital park includes spaces for research, development and local business opportunities. The Mangroves, BiodiverCity’s second and central island dedicated to businesses, is organized around a network of sheltered urban wetlands, creating suitable environments for its namesake Mangrove forests—an important natural infrastructure that doubles as effective powerhouses for sequestering more than four times as much carbon as a typical forest.

At the center of the Mangroves, the Bamboo Beacon hosts meetings, conferences and major events—broadcasting the knowledge developed in BiodiverCity out to the world. The buildings in BiodiverCity will be designed to perform efficiently and will to a large extent be constructed by low-carbon materials such as bamboo and Malaysian timber in combination with green concrete, a sustainable alternative comprised of industrial waste and recycled materials. By encouraging green roofs, facades, public and private open spaces, the islands can form a nearly continuous habitat mosaic feeding back into the forests, beaches, riparian zones and estuaries at the island’s edges.

The Laguna, BiodiverCity’s westernmost island, is an oasis for ecological living, organized around a central marina. Eight smaller islands form a miniature archipelago, where floating, stilted and terraced housing takes advantage of the natural setting of Tanjung Gertak Sanggul.

Source by BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group.