Politics Monday: Tamara Keith And Amy Walter On Latest In Washington (PBS)

NPR’s Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including the differences between President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden on climate change and what the Trump campaign’s willingness to hold large indoor rallies says about Trump’s perspective on the pandemic.

Top Home Tour Videos: “Woods Hole Waterfront Estate” In Massachusetts

How rare is the opportunity for a luxurious home in a prestigious historic setting on a property with incomparable views. The Crane Estate on Juniper Point in Woods Hole has received extensive renovation to transform the original mansion into a 16-room luxurious residence honoring the history of this notable landmark with 21st century amenities. For the discerning buyer, the residence features 7,500 sq. feet of handsome living space on three floors, with elevator, 2-car garage and over 380 feet of waterfront. The 8-bedroom, 7.5-bath estate features separate living quarters with a full kitchen for guests or family, all with spectacular views of Woods Hole and Nantucket Sound waters. The Point is landscaped with mature trees and walking trail around the 2-acre property. Attention to detail, finest materials and restoration care are the underpinnings for an incomparable lifestyle on this private estate.

Design Books: “Handmade In Japan – The Pursuit Of Perfection” (Gestalten)

After documenting the crafts makers and traditional artisans of Japan for years, Irwin Wong assembled this wealth of unique knowledge and culture in a book. Handmade in Japan is a look into the endless pursuit of excellence, and this film represents some of the individuals featured in the book.

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Morning News Podcast: 35 Dead In Western fires, New Tropical Storm Sally

This Morning With Gordon Deal reports: At least 35 dead as fires continue to rage across the west, the Gulf Coast braces for Tropical Storm Sally and how to build a resilient business during a pandemic.

Health: “Smart Hospitals” Using AI & Sensors Could Reduce Thousands Of Deaths Yearly (Stanford)

SEPTEMBER 9, 2020

As many as 400,000 Americans die each year because of medical errors, but many of these deaths could be prevented by using electronic sensors and artificial intelligence to help medical professionals monitor and treat vulnerable patients in ways that improve outcomes while respecting privacy.

The Fix: Invisible light guided by AI?

Haque, who compiled the 170 scientific papers cited in the Nature article, said the field is based largely on the convergence of two technological trends: the availability of infrared sensors that are inexpensive enough to build into high-risk care-giving environments, and the rise of machine learning systems as a way to use sensor input to train specialized AI applications in health care.

These alert systems are being tested to see if they can reduce the number of ICU patients who get nosocomial infections — potentially deadly illnesses contracted by patients due to failure of other people in the hospital to fully adhere to infection prevention protocols.

Constant monitoring by ambient intelligence systems in a home environment could also be used to detect clues of serious illness or potential accidents, and alert caregivers to make timely interventions. For instance, when frail seniors start moving more slowly or stop eating regularly, such behaviors can presage depression, a greater likelihood of a fall or the rapid onset of a dangerous health crisis. Researchers are developing activity recognition algorithms that can sift through infrared sensing data to detect changes in habitual behaviors, and help caregivers get a more holistic view of patient well-being.

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