Iconic Restaurants: Remembering “Windows On The World” At The World Trade Center

From an Eater.com online article:

The view from Windows on the World, in this photo taken in 1977, included Governors Island and the Statue of Liberty Getty ImagesThe light is different, higher contrast. Real-life chiaroscuro. And sound is muted, still, almost absent. Except when the wind is kicking up a tremendous, otherworldly, howl. And the city looks so small, innocent, like a child’s train set, the Statue of Liberty a tchotchke in a tourist shop. Sixty-mile views that reach the Hudson Highlands up north, the Atlantic Ocean to the east and south, and, much closer, planes landing and taking off at three major airports.

There are few New York City restaurants more storied than Windows on the World. The restaurant made its debut on the 107th floor of the World Trade Center’s North Tower in 1976, offering sweeping views of Manhattan, Brooklyn, and New Jersey — the earth itself peppered with the buildings, the bridges, the Statue of Liberty; the sky with tourist helicopters. “Windows was a shining ambassador for New York, an escape from a city that was, in decades past, drug addled, dirty, and crime-ridden below,” Eater NY’s Ryan Sutton reminisced in 2014. “Even if you didn’t know much about fine dining, you knew such a dream-like place existed, and you knew that it came tumbling down on September 11, 2001.”

To read more: https://www.eater.com/2019/9/17/20862698/world-trade-center-restaurant-windows-on-the-world-history-design-book-excerpt

Top New Travel Videos: “The Hand Of India” By Simon Mulvaney (2019)

Filmed, Edited and Directed by: Simon Mulvaney

The Hand Of India By Simon Mulvaney (2019)

At the height of the Cold War, amidst growing tensions between the US and Russia, Indian Prime Minister, Indira Gandhi traveled to Washington D.C to deliver a pragmatic speech on the subjects of communication, understanding and friendship.

35 years later, with increasing polarisation around the globe, her simple yet elegant message has never felt so relevant.

However, it is in India, where Indira Gandhi’s message still rings most true; somehow managing to make sense of a beguiling and beautifully chaotic society, with a rich reputation of inspiring swathes of Western visitors.

The Hand Of India By Simon Mulvaney (2019)

Shot during a two month backpacking trip, with minimal camera equipment, this is my attempt to communicate the beauty of Indira’s home country, along with the resonating themes she touched upon all those years ago.

New Books On Aging: “Elderhood – Redefining Aging, Transforming Medicine, Reimagining Life” By Louise Aronson

From Louise Aronson’s website:

Elderhood coverNoted Harvard-trained geriatrician Louise Aronson uses stories from her quarter century of caring for patients and draws from history, science, literature, popular culture, and her own life to weave a vision of old age that’s neither nightmare nor utopian fantasy—a vision full of joy, wonder, frustration, outrage, and hope about aging, medicine, and life itself.

For more than 5,000 years, “old” has been defined as beginning between the ages of 60 and 70. Now that humans are living longer than ever before, many people alive today will be elders for 30 years or more. Yet at the very moment that most of us will spend more years in elderhood than in childhood, we’ve made old age into a disease, a condition to be dreaded, disparaged, neglected, and denied.

To read more: https://louisearonson.com/books/elderhood/