Crossing The Cotswolds: To Blenheim And Broadway And Back

A brisk 2.9 mile walk (yes, 2.9 miles) in mildly drizzly weather from The Swan Hotel door back to the breakfast room set up a perfect day.

Drove to Blenheim Palace and arrived at the 10:00 am opening time. Gorgeous grounds and gated entrance.

Famed Italian Artist Mauricio Cattelan was featured throughout the Palace and grounds which added to the spectacle.

We entered the palace at 10:30 and were swept up in an amazing tour of the Duke of Marlborough’s residence.

The audio tour was very informative and kept your interest in every room.

Cattelan’s very humorous exhibits were meant to convey the very accidental and interactive nature life and art, with the aim of softening the imposing feel of the castle. Amazing.

The Winston Churchill exhibits at the end were spectacular in breadth and scope.

We left at 1:00 and drove to Broadway and a walk of the very polished town, full of art galleries, custom shops and elite hotels.

A great sandwich and salad at a deli on the Main Street was followed by a drive to the Broadway Tower.

We headed back to Bibury and a glass of Rose in the small park in front of The Swan Hotel.

Destination Travel: The “Takyo Abeke” Guest House In Omori, Japan Is Built In Samurai Tradition

From the Takyo Abeke website:

Takyo Abeke BathSituated along the winding mountain road that is the historic village of Omori, Takyo Abeke is hidden behind a rustic bamboo fence covered in climbing roses and shielded from the road by a deep courtyard garden. The 228-year-old building was once the home of the Abe family (Abeke), who were administrative officials for the Iwami Ginzan silver mine dug deep into the mountains at the top of the village. During the 17th and 18th centuries the silver mine was the largest in the world, and its output financed not only bustling local village life and imposing houses like Abeke but also Japan’s rapid economic growth, urbanization, and flowering of its unique culture of shibusa— aesthetics based on nature, simplicity, and the ephemeral—during the first centuries of the Edo period (1603-1868).

Website: http://www.takyo-abeke.jp/english/