Tag Archives: Underwater Views

360° Views: Underwater Life In Marsa Alam, Egypt

A 360° underwater view in the waters off Marsa Alam, Egypt.

Marsa Alam is a resort town on the Red Sea in Egypt. It’s renowned for its sandy beaches and coral reefs. The U-shaped Abu Dabab Bay is known for its sea turtles and dugongs (sea cows). Kite-surf site El Naaba Lagoon is separated from the open sea by a coral reef. Wadi el-Gemal National Park, south of the town, encompasses desert, seagrass beds, reefs and islands. 

Views: The ‘Blue Paradises Of French Polynesia’ (4K)

Bora Bora, Fakarava, Ranguiroa, Tahiti, Tikehau, Moorea, Maupiti…

Our Odyssey through these islands and atolls is one of the most spectacular diving expeditions we have had the chance to do.
A crystal clear water (visbility can reach 45 meters), hundreds of different reef fish species, corals and pelagic, to sum up : an exceptional beauty both in terms of flora and fauna.

French Polynesia is known as the largest shark santuary in the world,
probably the only place in the world where you can see 6 species of sharks in a single dive : Grey reef sharks, Tiger sharks, Black-tip sharks, White-tip sharks, Nurse sharks and Lemon sharks. Yes! In a single dive.
The dives are mainly drifting because of the underwater topography of its passes, this is where the show begins, life is teeming: Hammerhead sharks, dolphins, school of barracuda, eagle rays, turtles, manta rays, marbled groupers, tuna, napoleons… We are not going to give you an exhaustive list, because there are around 800 species, I’ll let you imagine.
We dived into the main passes:Tiputa, Tumakohua, Garuae, Avatoru,… But the one that offered us the most beautiful spectacle is undoubtedly Tetamanu, the southern pass of Fakarava. Imagine yourself in front of a wall of 700 sharks (We were there the third week of June).
If you do not yet practice scuba diving, no worries, you can fully enjoy the beauties that French Polynesia has to offer by practicing snorkeling.
In the stunning lagoon of Moorea, you can snorkel with stingrays, black tip sharks and colorful fishes.

If French Polynesia benefits from a unique underwater environment, magnificent coral reefs and amazing lagoons, it is also an earthly paradise, not only for its majestic scenery or its dream beaches but above all for the kindness of the Polynesians (Tahitians).
So far we have mainly traveled to the Society Islands and the Tuamotus but we are planning to go in the Austral archipelago to swim with the
Humpback whales. Exploring Polynesia is the adventure of a lifetime, because it is the size of Europe.

Island Views: A ‘Magical’ Coral Reef Found In Tahiti

A “magical” coral reef stretching as far as the eye can see has been discovered off the coast of the South Pacific island Tahiti. The beautiful reef took around 25 years to grow and was found in the “twilight zone”, where it is highly unusual to unearth such a find as there is barely enough light to sustain life. “It was magical to witness giant, beautiful rose corals which stretch for as far as the eye can see. It was like a work of art,” said French photographer Alexis Rosenfeld, who led the team of international divers that made the discovery. The acres of giant corals in pristine condition show no sign of being damaged by climate change and demonstrate just how little we know about the ocean, according to experts. They say it shows the need to protect the world’s remaining healthy reefs from environmental damage. Read the full story here: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/world-new..

Ocean Views: Cuttlefish Mesmerize Their Prey (BBC)

This specialist hunter knows just how dangerous their prey can be. To solve this problem, they hypnotise crabs by changing the colour of their skin.

Cuttlefish or cuttles are marine molluscs of the order Sepiida. They belong to the class Cephalopoda, which also includes squid, octopuses, and nautiluses. Cuttlefish have a unique internal shell, the cuttlebone, which is used for control of buoyancy. 

Underwater Views: The ‘Hawaiian Garden Eel’ (PBS)

The Hawaiian garden eel is an eel in the family Congridae. It was described by John Ernest Randall and James Robert Chess in 1980. It is a marine, tropical eel which is known from the Hawaiian archipelago, in the eastern central Pacific Ocean. It is non-migratory, and is thought to be restricted to the region.