Tag Archives: Monocle on Design

Arts & Design Podcast: “2020 Venice Glass Week” & Top Brand “Wonderglass”

Monocle On Design: Looking for a crystal-clear take on Venice Glass Week? Monocle’s Ed Stocker checks in with WonderGlass, the brand that bonds traditional Italian craftsmanship with contemporary design.

WonderGlass bonds traditional craftsmanship with contemporary design, providing tailor-made solutions to the worlds of architecture, art and fashion – telling a story through our creations we aim to bring individuals into a delightful WonderLand. A surrealistic and dreamlike atmosphere which creates a seamless landscape of lighting, subtle colours and visual elements forming a world that captures people’s imagination.

Founded in 2013, Christian and Maurizio Mussati built their brand through bespoke glass lighting and installations handcrafted in Murano, working with renowned creative minds including Zaha Hadid, Jaime Hayon, India Mahdavi, John Pawson, Nao Tamura, Marcel Wanders, Dan Yeffet and Hideki Yoshimoto.

Now working with their team of WonderLab artisans in the Venetian region and collaborating with leading names in design and architecture such as Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec, nendo, RML (Ana Meier & Hervé Descottes) and WOHA architects – WonderGlass offers architects, artists, developers, hotel designers and museums the opportunity to incorporate artisanal creations into projects of any scale.

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Venice Glass Week Website

Air Travel Podcast: Future Cabin Design, Short Haul Airports And Exhibitions

‘Monocle On Design’ talks airplane interiors with Adam White, director of Factorydesign, and ask journalist Anthony Paletta why airports are designed with short-haul in mind. Plus: we jet off to Helsinki for an exhibition that celebrates the capacity of travel to broaden our horizons.

  • Factorydesign

    Monocle’s Nic Monisse caught up with Adam White, founder of aeronautical interiors firm Factorydesign, to discuss the future of seats, trims and finishes in airplane cabins.

  • Future-proofing airports

    Why are airports are so vulnerable to change? And how can they future-proof themselves? Design and architectural journalist Anthony Paletta has a few ideas.

  • ‘Travel as a Tool’

    Petri Burtsoff meets the curator and one of the designers of the Helsinki exhibition, ‘Travel as a Tool’, to discuss the ways in which traveling can affect design.

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Design Podcast: Islamic Geometric Patterns, Eco-Architecture & Shelley Klein’s Scottish Home

Monocle on Design Logo‘Monocle On Design’ discusses the origins of tessellations in Islamic art and ask how architecture affects our work-life balance. Plus: author Shelley Klein recounts her childhood in a mid-century house in Scotland and we preview Monocle’s city-themed July/August issue.

Monocle On Design - June 30 2020

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Podcast Interviews: Poster House Museum NYC Director Julia Knight

Monocle on DesignWhen New York City’s Poster House museum had to close its doors in early March, director Julia Knight wondered how the institution could support the city.

Today her inspiring solution can be seen across all five boroughs.

Poster House is the first museum in the United States dedicated exclusively to posters.

Through exhibitions, events, and publications, Poster House presents a global view of posters from their earliest appearance in the late 1800s to their present-day use. Poster House takes its mission from the medium, aiming to engage and educate all audiences as we investigate this large-format graphic design and its public impact.

Posters explore:

  • mass communication and persuasion
  • the intersection of art and commerce
  • control of the public domain

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Health: LVMH And Fashion Industry Now Making Hand Sanitizer, Masks And Protective Gear (Podcast)

Monocle 24 On Design LogoJamie Waters explains how the fashion industry emerged as a vital contributor in the fight against the pandemic. Many brands, big and small, have pivoted to make masks and other protective equipment.

Podcast Profiles: Irish Architect And Designer Eileen Gray (1878 – 1976)

Monocle 24 On Design LogoUnderappreciated in her lifetime, the career of late Irish architect and designer Eileen Gray is the subject of a timely new exhibition at The Bard Graduate Center Gallery in New York. Jennifer Goff, curator of the Eileen Gray collection at the National Museum of Ireland, tells us more.

Eileen Gray (born Kathleen Eileen Moray Smith; 9 August 1878 – 31 October 1976) was an Irish architect and furniture designer and a pioneer of the Modern Movement in architecture. Over her career, she was associated with many notable European artists of her era, including Kathleen Scott, Adrienne Gorska, Le Corbusier, and Jean Badovici, with whom she was romantically involved. Her most famous work is the house known as E-1027 in Roquebrune-Cap-Martin, France.

Eileen Gray website

From 1922/1923 to 1926 Gray created an informal architectural apprenticeship for herself as she never received any formal training as an architect. She studied theoretical and technical books, took drafting lessons, and arranged to have Adrienne Gorska take her along to building sites. She also traveled with Badovici to study key buildings and learned by reworking architectural designs.

E-1027 table by Eileen Gray

In 1926, she started work on a new holiday home near Monaco to share with Badovici. Because a foreigner in France couldn’t wholly own property, Gray bought the land and put it in Badovici’s name, making him her client on paper. Construction of the house took three years and Gray remained on site while Badovici visited occasionally.

Renewed interest in Gray’s work began in 1967 when historian Joseph Rykwert published an essay about her in the Italian design magazine Domus. After the publishing of the article many “students began to ring at her door” as eager to learn from the now famous designer.

At a Paris auction of 1972, Yves Saint Laurent bought ‘Le Destin’ and revived interest in Gray’s career.

The first retrospective exhibition of her work, titled ‘Eileen Gray: Pioneer of Design’, was held in London in 1972. A Dublin exhibition followed the next year. At the Dublin exhibit, the 95 year old Gray was given an honorary fellowship by the Royal Institute of the Architects of Ireland.

In 1973 Gray signed a contract to reproduce the Bibendum chair and many of her pieces for the first time. They remain in production.

Eileen Gray died on Halloween 1976. She is buried in the Père Lachaise cemetery in Paris, but because her family omitted to pay the licence fee her grave is not identifiable.

From Wikipedia