Tag Archives: Great Lakes

Covers: National Wildlife Magazine – June/July 2022

National Wildlife magazine June-July 2022 cover featuring Rock Harbor

June–July 2022 – The Fresh Water Issue: Saving The Stuff Of Life

  • Lisa Moore, Editorial Director
  • National Wildlife
  • Jun 10, 2022

On the cover: Surrounded by the waters of Lake Superior, Michigan’s Isle Royale National Park is a roadless haven for wildlife. Photo by Viktor Posnov

Winter: North Shore Of Lake Superior, Minnesota

“Sunday Morning” leaves us on this first Sunday morning of winter on the north shore of Lake Superior. Videographer: Scot Miller.

The North Shore of Lake Superior runs from DuluthMinnesota, United States, at the southwestern end of the lake, to Thunder Bay  and  NipigonOntario, Canada, in the north to Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, in the east. The shore is characterized by alternating rocky cliffs and cobblestone beaches, with forested hills and ridges through which scenic rivers and waterfalls descend as they flow to Lake Superior.

Winter Wildlife: A River Otter Survives In Upper Peninsula Of Michigan

It takes a special breed of animal to handle the Michigan winter–and the river otter is better prepared than most. But preparation is half the battle–and it starts with a roll in the snow to keep its fur coat insulated. The waters in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan freeze over fast in winter–and river otters need to work just as fast to keep holes open in the ice. If they close, the otters lose access to fish. From America’s Wild Seasons: https://bit.ly/3pikNyY

The Upper Peninsula is a forested region in Michigan bordering 3 of the Great Lakes and extending outward from Wisconsin. It’s connected to Michigan’s Lower Peninsula by the roughly 5-miles-long Mackinac Bridge, which spans the Straits of Mackinac. Sandwiched between the 2 peninsulas is Mackinac Island, a car-free vacation destination with the iconic 1887 Grand Hotel and the Victorian-era Fort Mackinac. 

History: ‘The Building Of The Erie Canal’ (1817-1825)

The Erie Canal is a 363-mile waterway that connects the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean via the Hudson River in upstate New York. The channel, which traverses New York state from Albany to Buffalo on Lake Erie, was considered an engineering marvel when it first opened in 1825.

The Erie Canal provided a direct water route from New York City to the Midwest, triggering large-scale commercial and agricultural development—as well as immigration—to the sparsely populated frontiers of western New York, Ohio, Indiana, Michigan and points farther west. The canal transformed New York City into the young nation’s economic powerhouse, and in 2000 the U.S. Congress designated the Erie Canal a National Heritage Corridor.