Tag Archives: Boomers Fitness & Exercise

Boomers Fitness: 63-Year Old Arizona Runner Hits Trail With His Dogs (WSJ)

From a Wall Street Journal online article:

Wall Street Journal This Marathoner Is A Dog's Best Friend Dec 1 2019Tuesday, Friday and Sunday, he is out before dawn for a 1.5- to two-hour run with Abby and Finn on one of the many trails accessible from Tucson along the Catalina Highway. The dogs are disciplined enough to run off-leash in a pack with him. The farthest he has taken Abby is a 13-mile, three-hour run. “She came home quite tired, as did I,” he says. When training for a marathon or longer distances, he adds a solo run on Wednesdays. He’ll run up to 23 miles on a network of paths in Tucson called the Loop.

Mr. McLean has had Achilles tendon problems as the result of tight calf muscles, and says he stretches for 15 minutes every night and before his morning run.

Like many marathoners, John McLean trains with running buddies. But if he isn’t keeping pace, he gets barked out. Mr. McLean is a dog-lover who logs miles with four-legged friends, both his own and rescues.

For years Mr. McLean, 63, ran solo. He and his wife, Barbara McLean, live in Arizona. They worked in the aerospace industry and travel made it tough to look after a dog. The day after Mr. McLean retired in 2014, he came home with Abby, a 10-week-old Chocolate Labrador.

To read more: https://www.wsj.com/articles/this-marathoner-is-a-dogs-best-friend-11575201674

Fitness: 65-Year Old Climber Steve Swenson “Endurance” Trains Six Day A Week, Avoiding Injuries

From an Outside Magazine online article:

Steve Swenson Book KarakoramIn the spring and summer, he trained two to four hours a day, six days a week, running daily and carrying 60 pounds of water up a 4,000-foot peak near his home in Seattle twice a week. “All the research has shown that 80 percent of training for alpine ascents needs to be long duration and low intensity, to build a huge foundation of endurance,” Swenson says. “There are no shortcuts to this. There’s no thirty-minute-a-day gym workout. You have to have the discipline to put the time in.” 

As an older climber, when I go out and train on any particular day, my big goal is to not get injured. In my twenties and thirties, I would push through a tight muscle or minor pain, but now I just stop. It’s not worth it. The most important thing is to be able to come back tomorrow.”

(Steve) Swenson laments the common scenario for many older people, who often work too much, exercise too little, and find themselves unhealthy during their golden years. “Imagine spending all your years looking forward to retirement and you can’t enjoy it,” Swenson says.

To read more: https://www.outsideonline.com/2405337/steve-swenson-mountaineer

Boomers Fitness: 63-Year Old Unicycler Pedaled 30,000 Miles To Peak Health

From a Wall Street Journal online article:

Mr. Peterson pulls a trick on his unicycle in Redondo Beach, Calif. PHOTO DAVID WALTER BANKS FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNALNow 63, Mr. Peterson has progressed from bike paths to rugged mountain trails and is known for his caped helmet emblazoned with his nickname, UniGeezer. Based on his GPS and bike computer, he estimates he’s logged nearly 30,000 miles, or 24 million pedal revolutions, since he started.

He thinks there’s a fear factor that prevents more people from trying unicycling. “If you fall, 99% of the time you land on your feet,” Mr. Peterson says. His worst injury was a torn piriformis, a tiny muscle behind the glutes, from overuse.

Unicycling isn’t as trendy as spin class, but Terry Peterson says he sweats just as much and smiles way more.

In 2006, at age 50, Mr. Peterson was 30 pounds overweight and got winded climbing a flight of stairs. His job as a piano tuner in Lomita, Calif., was mostly sedentary.

Popular workouts like running, cycling and boot camp sounded boring. “I needed something that would constantly demand my attention and keep me entertained,” he says. He thought back to his childhood unicycle, googled his old toy and was wowed by online videos of Canadian off-road unicycling pioneer Kris Holm. “This wasn’t the cheap ride I had when I was 11,” he says. “He was on a real, purpose-built unicycle doing unreal tricks.”

To read more: https://www.wsj.com/articles/hes-gone-a-long-way-on-his-unicycle-11571572801

Boomers Fitness: 50-Year Old Man Paddles In An Outrigger Canoe Club To Stay In Competitive Shape

From a Wall Street Journal article by Jen Murphy:

Mr. Alona, who grew up on Oahu, spent his youth bodyboarding, scuba diving and freediving. Photo by Ryan Henriksen for the Wall Street JournalMr. Aiona paddles with his club on Tuesday and Thursday nights and Saturday mornings for 90 minutes to two hours.They alternate between sprints and endurance paddles of up to eight miles in a six-man outrigger canoe. They also work on paddle technique and do huli drills. “Huli is Hawaiian for turn over,” he explains. “If you flip your canoe there is a very precise process for getting everyone safely and efficiently back in. We call out positions to make sure no one is underneath.
Then we work together to flip it, get all of the paddles into the canoe, bail water and get going again.”
On Sundays he paddles seven to 10 miles alone.“Flaws become more apparent as there is no one else to carry your weight,” he says. Sometimes he and another club member train together in a canoe. In winter, lights are added to the canoes for evening practices and Mr. Aiona dons boots and wetsuit -style pants.

Boomers Outdoor Fitness: 56-Year Old Cylcles On Gravel Roads To Stay In Great Shape

From a Wall Street Journal article by Jen Murphy:

Cyclist Turns to Gravel to Stay FitGravel riding is more jarring than road riding so strength and mobility really come into play. “Your upper body takes much more of a beating,” Mr. Wilwerding says. “Especially when you’re riding bumpy terrain for eight hours.” With the help of a coach, he has trained to participate in five century rides—three road, two gravel—this summer. His next ride, the SBT GRVL, takes place Aug. 18 and covers 141 miles and about 9,000 feet of climbing in Steamboat Springs, Colo. “I’m in the best shape of my life outside of my collegiate swimming career,” he says.

When Doug Wilwerding wanted to mix up his long-distance cycling routine two years ago, he considered mountain biking. Then 54 years old, he was deterred by the potential for injury from dodging rocks and roots while flying downhill. Instead, he took up gravel riding, a relatively new sport where you ride on unpaved roads, including dirt, gravel and mixed-surface terrain.

Read more by clicking on the link below:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/a-cyclist-turns-to-gravel-to-stay-fit-11562497260