Politics Monday: Tamara Keith And Amy Walter On The Latest In Washington

NPR’s Tamara Keith and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report join Judy Woodruff to discuss the latest political news, including President Trump’s prediction of an economic resurgence after the pandemic, the difference in campaign strategies between Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden and how public perceptions of the COVID-19 threat vary according to political identity.

New Books: “The Louvre – The Many Lives Of The World’s Most Famous Museum” (James Gardner)

The Louvre James GardnerThe fascinating and little-known story of the Louvre, from its inception as a humble fortress to its transformation into the palatial residence of the kings of France and then into the world’s greatest art museum.

Some ten million people from all over the world flock to the Louvre each year to enjoy its incomparable art collection. Yet few of them are aware of the remarkable history of that place and of the buildings themselves―a fascinating story that historian James Gardner elegantly chronicles in the first full-length history of the Louvre in English.

More than 7,000 years ago, men and women camped on a spot called le Louvre for reasons unknown; a clay quarry and a vineyard supported a society there in the first centuries AD. A thousand years later, King Philippe Auguste of France constructed a fortress there in 1191, just outside the walls of a city far smaller than the Paris we know today. Intended to protect the capital against English soldiers stationed in Normandy, the fortress became a royal residence under Charles V two centuries later, and then the monarchy’s principal residence under the great Renaissance king François I in 1546.

It remained so until 1682, when Louis XIV moved his entire court to Versailles. Thereafter the fortunes of the Louvre languished until the tumultuous days of the French Revolution when, during the Reign of Terror in 1793, it first opened its doors to display the nation’s treasures. Ever since―through the Napoleonic era, the Commune, two World Wars, to the present―the Louvre has been a witness to French history, and expanded to become home to a legendary collection, including such masterpieces as the Mona Lisa and Venus de Milo, whose often-complicated and mysterious origins form a spectacular narrative that rivals the building’s grand stature.

James Gardner

James Gardner is an American art critic and literary critic based in New York and Buenos Aires. He is the author of six books, including Buenos Aires: The Biography of a City. His writings have appeared in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the New Republic, and the British Spectator. He was the art critic at the New York Post and wrote architecture criticism for the New York Observer, before serving as the architecture critic at the New York Sun. He is now a contributing editor at The Magazine Antiques.

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Top New Art Magazines: “Apollo – May 2020” Issue

INSIDE THE ISSUE
FEATURES | Julio Le Parc interviewed by Gabrielle SchwarzGlenn Adamson on the MFA Boston at 150; Aaron Rosen on the Rothko Chapel in Houston; Valeria Costa-Kostritsky on rebuilding Notre-Dame
REVIEWS | Morgan Falconer on Donald Judd at MoMA; Edward J. Sullivan on Mexican muralism at the Whitney; Maichol Clemente on Renaissance terracottas in Padua; Susan Owens on ghosts in ancient Rome; Craig Burnett on Philip Guston; Stephen Patience on Blake Gopnik’s biography of Andy Warhol; Thomas Marks on F.T. Marinetti’s Futurist Cookbook
MARKET | Gareth Harris on online viewing rooms; and the latest art market columns from Susan Moore and Emma Crichton-Miller
PLUS | Thomas Campbell and Adam Koszary debate the role of the digital museumJames Wilkes on trompe-l’oeil and artistic trickery; Kathryn Hughes on the image of Florence NightingaleTimothy Brittain-Catlin on contemporary architectural follies; Thomas Marks in search of art during lockdownRobert O’Byrne on an exceptional collection of Chinese art

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New Aerial Travel Videos: “Iceland – The Greatness Within | Highlands” (2020)

Filmed and Edited by: Jurgis Kreilis / FilmDay

Two years ago I went to Iceland the first time. Shortly after return I gave myself a promise to visit this beautiful county and it’s nature once again. I even made a bucket list of things I still want to exprience there.

I kept the promise and returned to Iceland once again last year in September. I joined the expedition to Icelandic highlands for unseen natural landscapes, ever changing weather, first dance with northerthern lights and the overall greatness within. This was an amazing experience that crossed out few things from my bucket list. But I’m not done with Iceland. There are still few things and seasons I’d love to experience there…