Tag Archives: Johns Hopkins

Covid-19: ‘How mRNA Vaccines Work’ (Video)

Messenger RNA—or mRNA—vaccines have been in development for decades, and are now approved for use against COVID-19. Here’s how they work and what you should know about them. Visit https://www.jhsph.edu/covid-19​ for even more resources.

Health: American ‘Covid-19 Data In Motion’ (Video)

Video highlights of COVID-19 data trends as of December 13, 2020. This daily report shares critical data on the spread of COVID-19 over the last 24 hours.

For the latest news, trends, and expert insights on the coronavirus pandemic, visit the JHU Coronavirus Resource Center: https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/

Explore COVID-19 trends around the world with our in-depth data tracking: New cases and cumulative cases: https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/data/cumu…

Daily new cases, testing, and positivity ratio by U.S. state: https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/testing/t…

New cases by country: https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/data/new-…

Medical: ‘Johns Hopkins Musculoskeletal Center’ – For Muscles, Bones And Connective Tissues (Video)

The Johns Hopkins Musculoskeletal Center aims to streamline and improve access for diagnosis and treatment of conditions affecting muscles, bones and connective tissues. Each of the center’s locations feature a diverse group of physicians, therapists, and advanced practitioners who work together to bring you the right treatment at the right time.

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Sleeping Better: Positions And Environment Matter (Johns Hopkins Medicine)

From Johns Hopkins Medicine:

Johns Hopkins Medicine“The sleep environment is something that can easily be fixed,” Salas says. By giving a little thought to positioning your body and bed, you might find your slumber is even sweeter.

For young, healthy people, sleep position is less important, Salas says. “But as you get older and have more medical issues, sleep position can become positive or negative.”

Consider these factors before you switch off the light:

  • Back and neck pain: When it comes to alleviating pain, sleeping on your back is a mixed bag, Salas says. For people with neck pain, sleeping face up can sometimes make the pain worse. But many people find back sleep is helpful for alleviating low-back pain. If you have soreness in your spine, experiment with different positions and pillows to find what works for you.
  • Snoring and sleep apnea: Obstructive sleep apnea causes the airways to collapse during sleep, leading to pauses in breathing. It often goes hand-in-hand with snoring. Positioning yourself on your side or stomach can help the airways stay open to reduce snoring and alleviate mild apnea, Salas says.
  • Reflux and heartburn: If you suffer from heartburn, sleeping on your right side can make symptoms worse, Salas says. That’s true for people who have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and for people who have heartburn for other reasons, such as pregnant women. Flip to your left side to cool the burn.
  • Appearance: If you sleep on your side or stomach, you’ve probably noticed creases on your face when you wake up. “Over time, that can lead to breakouts or cause chronic changes to the skin,” Salas says. “If you’re concerned about wrinkles, it’s another reason to sleep on your back.”

Don’t underestimate the importance of optimizing your bedroom to help you get a good night’s sleep. Salas adds:

  • Clean sheets: Wash sheets frequently and vacuum the mattress to rid it of dust and dander that can cause allergies and impair your sleep.
  • Close the blinds: Use curtains or blinds to keep the room dim at night. But open the curtains (or head outside) in the morning to reset your internal clock.
  • Location matters: Position your bed so you aren’t facing distractions such as a desk stacked with work or a blinking light.

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Health Update: “New Coronavirus Test” From Johns Hopkins Medicine

New Coronavirus test developed by Johns Hopkins microbiologists Karen Carroll and Heba Mostafa, look to test as many as 1,000 suspected Covid-19 cases per day in the Johns Hopkins Health System.

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Medical Reviews: “Unnecessary” Leg Stent Surgery Can Make Vascular Disease Worse

From a Wall Street Jouranl online article:

The Price We Pay - Marty Makary MDDr. Makary examines the practice of performing unnecessary vascular procedures in a chapter of his new book, “The Price We Pay,” published Sept. 10. In it, he describes what seems to be the “predatory” practice of some doctors seeking out patients at health screenings in churches.

Dr. Hicks says performing unnecessary leg procedures like stenting can make vascular disease worse, creating blockage in narrow arteries or causing an artery to rupture. She says patients with early leg pain have a 1% to 2% risk of limb loss after five years. But aggressive procedures increase that risk to 5% to 10%.

Some physicians are stenting leg arteries and removing plaque at alarming rates, these doctors say. The often-avoidable procedures could put patients at risk of complications and worsening disease.

Johns Hopkins researchers published a study in June in the Journal of Vascular Surgery analyzing national data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the federal agency that administers the Medicare program. The research identified 320 physicians whose rates for conducting such procedures in patients newly diagnosed with leg pain were 14% or higher. The mean rate of all 5,664 physicians was 3.5%.

To read more: https://www.wsj.com/articles/doctors-sound-an-alarm-over-leg-stent-surgery-11568127286?mod=cx_immersive&cx_navSource=cx_immersive&cx_tag=poptarget&cx_artPos=1#cxrecs_s