Category Archives: Awards

Reviews: 2022 National Book Award Winner & Finalists For Fiction

“The Rabbit Hutch” by Tess Gunty book cover, featuring a hot pink background with a cutout showing an illustration of a woman inside.

Winner: “The Rabbit Hutch” by Tess Gunty

Set during an oppressively hot week in July, this contemporary coming-of-age novel is about four teens who have aged out of the foster care system and are living together in a once-bustling industrial city in Indiana. As one of the teens tries to escape the people and systems that have harmed her, this novel shines as a story about community and loneliness, cumulating with a devastating act of violence. “The Rabbit Hutch” is Tess Gunty’s debut novel and she was one of three authors nominated this year for their first published book.

Fiction Finalists

“The Birdcatcher” by Gayl Jones

Called “a study in Black women’s creative expression,” “The Birdcatcher” is told from the perspective of writer Amanda Wordlaw whose best friend is being repeatedly institutionalized for trying to kill her husband. Jones was first discovered and edited by Toni Morrison and her last novel, “Palmares,” was a 2022 Pulitzer Prize finalist.

“The Haunting of Hajji Hotak and Other Stories” by Jamil Jan Kochai

This collection of short stories explores heritage, home, and the ghosts of war, with elements of horror, magical realism, and more woven throughout the anthology. With unforgettable Afghan characters, these stories range from the connection between a young man’s video game and his father’s real memories of war to a doctor couple that decides to stay in their home even as violence grows and their son disappears.

“All This Could Be Different” by Sarah Thankam Mathews

Sneha is a queer Indian woman who has just graduated from college into a recession and moved to Milwaukee to start an entry-level corporate job that offers the financial security she needs, opening more doors than ever before. But as challenges rise and her world begins to spin out of control, Sneha throws herself into a new relationship while her friend tries to find a radical solution to their problems.

“The Town of Babylon” by Alejandro Varela

In the wake of his husband’s infidelity, Andrés returns to his hometown and decides to go to his 20-year high school reunion, rekindling old friendships and reuniting with an old love. As he cares for his aging parents, navigates his old neighborhood, and revisits old friends, Andrés must face old wounds, systems, and people who shaped his life in many different ways.

Top Books Of 2022: The Booker Prize Shortlist

The Booker Prize 2022 shortlist:

  • ‘Glory’ by NoViolet Bulawayo
  • ‘The Trees’ by Percival Everett
  • ‘Treacle Walker’ by Alan Garner
  • ‘The Seven Moons of Maali Almeida’ by Shehan Karunatilaka
  • ‘Small Things Like These’ by Claire Keegan
  • ‘Oh William!’ by Elizabeth Strout

Here’s what the judges had to say about the final six. Find out more about the shortlisted books and authors: https://thebookerprizes.com/the-booke…

Architecture: 2022 Design Educates Award Winners

Winners of the 2022 Design Educates Awards. Each year, the Design Educates Awards highlight international design projects that tackle context-specific concerns and educate users about sustainability.

Top Photography: African Cheetahs – The Great Swim

Discover the story behind one of this year’s most dramatic images through the lens of Highly Commended wildlife photographer Buddhilini de Soyza.

When the Mara and Talek rivers broke their banks in January 2020 due to unseasonal flooding, the famed Tano Bora coalition of cheetahs were faced with a difficult choice.

The Natural History Museum in London is home to over 80 million objects, including meteorites, dinosaur bones and a giant squid. Our channel brings the Museum to you – from what goes on behind the scenes to surprising science and stories from our scientists.

Books: 2022 Booker Prize Shortlist Announced

The Shortlist

Heaven

Told through the eyes of a 14-year-old boy subjected to relentless bullying, this is a haunting novel of the threat of violence that can stalk our teenage years. Translated by Samuel Bett and David Boyd.

By Mieko Kawakami

Translated by Samuel Bett David Boyd

Elena Knows

A unique story that interweaves crime fiction with intimate tales of morality and the search for individual freedom. Translated by Frances Riddle.

By Claudia Piñeiro

Translated by Frances Riddle

A New Name: Septology VI-VII

Jon Fosse delivers both a transcendent exploration of the human condition and a radically ‘other’ reading experience – incantatory, hypnotic, and utterly unique. Translated by Damion Searls.

By Jon Fosse

Translated by Damion Searls

Tomb of Sand

An urgent yet engaging protest against the destructive impact of borders, whether between religions, countries or genders. Translated by Daisy Rockwell.

By Geetanjali Shree

Translated by Daisy Rockwell

The Books of Jacob

Olga Tokarczuk’s portrayal of Enlightenment Europe on the cusp of precipitous change, searching for certainty and longing for transcendence. Translated by Jennifer Croft.

By Olga Tokarczuk

Translated by Jennifer Croft

Cursed Bunny

Bora Chung presents a genre-defying collection of short stories, which blur the lines between magical realism, horror and science fiction. Translated by Anton Hur.

By Bora Chung

Translated by Anton Hur

2022 Pen/Faulkner: Rabih Alameddine’s ‘The Wrong End Of The Telescope’

WINNER OF THE 2022 PEN/FAULKNER AWARD FOR FICTION

Mina Simpson, a Lebanese doctor, arrives at the infamous Moria refugee camp on Lesbos, Greece, after being urgently summoned for help by her friend who runs an NGO there. Alienated from her family except for her beloved brother, Mina has avoided being so close to her homeland for decades. But with a week off work and apart from her wife of thirty years, Mina hopes to accomplish something meaningful, among the abundance of Western volunteers who pose for selfies with beached dinghies and the camp’s children. Soon, a boat crosses bringing Sumaiya, a fiercely resolute Syrian matriarch with terminal liver cancer. Determined to protect her children and husband at all costs, Sumaiya refuses to alert her family to her diagnosis. Bonded together by Sumaiya’s secret, a deep connection sparks between the two women, and as Mina prepares a course of treatment with the limited resources on hand, she confronts the circumstances of the migrants’ displacement, as well as her own constraints in helping them.