Cities: Dubai’s Radical 2040 Urban Master Plan (Video)

The Dubai 2040 Urban Master Plan maps out a comprehensive plan for a sustainable urban development in Dubai. It focuses on enhancing people’s happiness and quality of life and reinforcing Dubai as a global destination for citizens, residents and visitors over the next 20 years.  

The plan has a strategic structural layout, integrating all urban development master plans in the emirate and aligned it with Dubai’s strategic economic priorities and the needs of the future.

Dubai 2040 Urban Master Plan is the seventh development plan for the emirate since 1960. Between 1960 and 2020, the population of Dubai has multiplied 80 times from 40,000 in 1960 to 3.3 million while the urban and built area of the emirate increased 170-fold from 3.2 square km.

Covers: France-Amérique Magazine – January 2022

Winter Views: Denali National Park, Alaska (4K)

This film was shot near Anchorage, Alaska in December 2021.

December 2021 was the snowiest December on record in the nearby Denali National Park, bringing over 6ft of snow and unusually freezing temperatures. During the filming, temperature repeatedly dropped below -20F (-30C). In addition to the challenging weather conditions, December days are the shortest in the year. In Anchorage, the sun rises after 10 AM and sets around 3 PM, while barely rising above the lofty peaks on the horizon.

Morning News: China Trade Deal Shortfall, Banks Offering Crypto

A.M. Edition for Jan. 4. China has failed to live up to its end of a 2020 trade deal with the U.S., buying far fewer American products and services than promised.

But will President Biden retaliate and risk reigniting the trade war? WSJ’s Josh Zumbrun walks us through China’s lackluster spending and the options facing the White House as it considers its response. Luke Vargas hosts.

Views: Blue Mountain Lakes In Afghanistan

The winter landscape around the deep, blue mountain lakes of Band-e-Amir in the central Afghan province of Bamiyan presents an arresting spectacle empty of people – but the absence of visitors is costing locals dearly.

Band-e Amir, situated around 3,000 metres (9,840 ft) above sea level and a couple of hours drive from the renowned Buddhist sites of Bamiyan, usually attracts thousands of visitors a year seeking respite from the endless conflict.

All that changed this year as the Taliban swept through one province after another, culminating in the shock overthrow of the Western-backed government in Kabul in August and plunging the economy into crisis as vital foreign aid dried up.