Science: Ripple Effects Of Mass Incarceration, Dog-Sniff Evidence Reliability

This week we are covering the Science special issue on mass incarceration. Can a dog find a body? Sometimes. Can a dog indicate a body was in a spot a few months ago, even though it’s not there now? 

There’s not much scientific evidence to back up such claims. But in the United States, people are being sent to prison based on this type of evidence. Host Sarah Crespi talks with Peter Andrey Smith, a reporter and researcher based in Maine, about the science—or lack thereof—behind dog-sniff evidence.

With 2 million people in jail or prison in the United States, it has become incredibly common to have a close relative behind bars. Sarah talks with Hedwig Lee, a sociologist at Washington University in St. Louis, about the consequences of mass incarceration for families of the incarcerated, from economic to social.

Tours: ‘Captain Kelly’s Cottage’ On Bruny Island in Southern Tasmania

Captain Kelly’s Cottage is the story of restoring a historical home on the edge of the world. The house was finished in 2016 by John Wardle Architects for John and his wife Susan.

Having bought Waterview without knowing its history, John and Susan quickly researched the landscape and its colonial settlement. After asking neighbours and previous owners, John found out that Captain Kelly was a first-generation European Australian with convict parents. Before John and Susan intervened, the cottage had weathered multiple additions and alterations and, along the way, lost a sense of its own history.

As one of two large structures perched along the edge of the vast maritime landscape, looking out over the ocean of Storm Bay, Captain Kelly’s Cottage is steeped in architectural history. Throughout the story of restoring a historical home on the edge of the world, John Wardle Architects achieved a contemporary reading of the existing structure whilst featuring important elements of its past.

For a small and condensed project, John found the restoration challenging – to give the interior design and the architecture a present-day reinterpretation, whilst staying true to its heritage and understanding the environmental impacts and climatic conditions of being on the edge of a cliff. John also took the time to understand the responsibility of owning the Tasmanian land.

More recently, research into the pre-colonial history of the First Nation’s stewardship of the property is being undertaken, an important task John is intent on doing. As the story of restoring a historical home on the edge of the world comes to a close, John views his interventions as a curatorial restoration. The home is primarily made from timber and brick, which has been locally sourced.

Additionally, a lot of the interior design is fuelled by locally sourced elements – materials, furniture and pieces. Fabrics and objects within the interior have also been sourced by John and Susan from their international travels, evoking the essence of a maritime home on the edge of a cliff, looking out to the world beyond. Stated to have been built by carpenters from Kelly’s ship, the architecture and interior design of the home today speaks to its original identity and tells the story of restoring a historical home on the edge of the world.

Internally, a strip of paint has been removed to reveal the home’s original paint colours, exploring both the original and subsequent eras of the cottage’s existence at once. Located on Bruny Island in Southern Tasmania, Captain Kelly’s Cottage by John Wardle Architects is a significant intersection of historical eras. The cottage is the story of restoring a historical home on the edge of the world; there is an appreciation felt throughout – of its past and a celebration for its future.

Boat Tours: Lake Brienz In Switzerland (8K Video)

A Scenic steamship Lötschberg Boat Tour From Interlaken to Brienz in 8K resolution !

Boat trip on Lake Brienz: Your excursion to Lake Brienz begins at the jetty in Brienz or Interlaken Ost. Check the departure times and the programmes on offer, then select the boat trip on the turquoise waters of Lake Brienz that most appeals to you. The entire round trip across the lake goes from Brienz to the Giessbach Falls, then onto Oberried, Iseltwald, Niederried, Ringgenberg, Bönigen, Interlaken Ost and back again. The trip takes about an hour and a quarter. Enjoy a memorable boat trip on the lake. The nostalgia trip on the impressive steamboat, for example, departs from Interlaken Ost to Giessbach and back – with an exclusive stop at the idyllic jetty. Would you like to end an eventful day with the wind in your hair and the evening sun shining on your face? If so, you’re sure to enjoy the evening trip from Interlaken Ost to Iseltwald and back.

Design: The ‘ST/Songeun Building’ In Seoul, Korea

ST international and songeun art & cultural foundation unveil the result of a collaboration with herzog & de meuron. the group announces details of its new ST / songeun building which will celebrate its opening on september 30th with inaugural exhibitions, the first curated by the swiss architecture firm. expressed as a minimalistic concrete monolith, the gallery stands as herzog & de meuron’s first realized project in korea and will establish a significant landmark in seoul.

Walking Tours: Le Havre In Northern France (4K)

Le Havre is a major port in northern France’s Normandy region, where the Seine River meets the English Channel. It’s joined to the city across the estuary, Honfleur, by the Pont de Normandie cable-stayed bridge. Following WWII, Le Havre’s heavily damaged city center was famously redesigned by Belgian architect Auguste Perret. Today it features many landmark examples of reinforced-concrete architecture.

Morning News: EU-China Tensions, Media Summit, Electric Lamborghinis

We discuss the tensions between the EU and China ahead of a call between Charles Michel and Xi Jinping and hear about the importance of news anchors at the Monocle 24 Media Summit. Plus, Lamborghini’s efforts to decarbonise its production.